Resilient Movement Foundations Course Review

I recently had the pleasure of attending a class put on by my fellas at Resilient Performance Physical Therapy.

A jolly old time with old friends and new

I went to this course for a few reasons. First off, I of course support the home team. I can’t even front, Douglas Kechijian, Trevor Rappa, Greg Spatz, and I go way back, and are very much related through IFAST family and directly (Doug is my younger older brother, Trevor is my son, and Greg is my stepson #dysfunctionalfamily).

That said, there is were a couple big things I wanted to take away from this course, which I did in spades:

  • Mastering basic movement
  • Program design

In these two areas, the Resilient fellas delivered in spades. Knowing what good technique is in the basic movement patterns, how to coach, and how to regress, are all underappreciated topics that these guys teach quite well.

So should you take this course? An emphatic hell yes. I give a more indepth review as to why in the video below, so go ahead and check that out.

Once you got the verdict, check out my favorite takeaways in the course notes, and then for the love of God sign up for a course of theirs!

Click here to check out the Resilient Seminar Page

Continue reading “Resilient Movement Foundations Course Review”

Impingement, Trusting Your Assessment, Noncompliance, and the Off-Switch – Movement Debrief Episode 15

If you are beyond sad that you missed last night’s Movement Debrief, number 15, I got your back. This time both audio and video are available #growing up.

Here’s what we talked about:

  • What impingement is
  • How to treat impingement at any joint
  • When do local inputs matter?
  • Trusting your assessment process
  • When to go beyond your assessment process
  • Why context matters
  • Making the most of noncompliant people
  • Dealing with bad situations
  • The importance of having an “off switch”

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

 

Here were some of the links I mentioned in this Debrief.

The 3 Biggest Basketball Conditioning Mistakes

Practical Basketball Conditioning

How to Treat Pain with Sitting – A Case Study

Neurocoffee

 

Death of Vertical Tibia, Usain Bolt, Complex Patients, and More – Movement Debrief Episode 13

Movement Debrief Episode 13 yesterday involved quite a few rants. Must’ve been the ketones talking.

Here’s what we talked about:

  • Restoring sensation with my patient with low back pain
  • Why it’s okay to have an angled tibia during squatting
  • Would any intervention help/hurt Usain Bolt?
  • The complexity of Usain Bolt
  • Struggling with a complex patient
  • Dealing with uncertainty
  • Embracing the struggle

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. (occasionally) They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

Here were some of the links I mentioned in this Debrief.

How to Deadlift – A Movement Deep Dive

Squatting Bar Reach – A Movement Deep Dive

The Sensitive Nervous System – Read my book notes here

Clinical Neurodynamics- Read my book notes here

A Study of Neurodynamics: The Body’s Living Alarm

Mobilisation of the Neuroimmune System – Read the course notes here

Explain Pain– Read the course notes here

Extreme Ownership

The Obstacle is the Way

Ego is the Enemy

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

Stress Response, Proximal First, Sensation Loss, and Your Health – Movement Debrief Episode 12

Let me guess, you are devastated you missed last night’s Movement Debrief.

You should be. It was by far the most interactive debrief we had yet. Loved how active everyone was, and definitely some people help me get better.

Kudos to Steve, Jo, Yonnie-Pooh, and the many others who commented on today’s Debrief.

Here’s what we talked about:

  • How the stress response impacts many areas
  • Treatment hierarchies
  • How to restore sensation loss post-surgery
  • Functional Medicine
  • Why taking care of your health helps others

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. (occasionally) They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

Trial and Error, Triplanar Movement, Networking, and Mentors – Movement Debrief Episode 11

Did you miss yesterday’s Movement Debrief? We had a lot of fun. The first time I went on facebook, twitter, and Instagram simultaneously.

This debrief was a bit different, as it didn’t involve as much reflection on my patient care, but more on the wonderful continuing education weekend I had.

I got to spend time with all my friends learning about a lot of different things. And it led to some great reflections.

Here’s what I talked about:

  1. Why trial and error is important
  2. Being outcome-focused
  3. How triplanar movement impacts single plane movements
  4. Why having a good network is important
  5. Keys the networking
  6. The importance of mentors

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

 

 

How to Design a Comprehensive Rehab Program

Just when I thought I was out, the clinic pulls me back in.

Though I’m glad to be back. There’s just a different vibe, different pace, and ever-constant variety of challenges that being in the clinic simply provides. This has been especially true working in a rural area. You see a much wider variety, which challenges you to broaden your skillset.

I’m amazed at how much working in the NBA has changed the way I approach the clinic.

Previously, I was all about getting people in and out of the door as quickly as possible; and with very few visits. I would cut them down to once a week or every other week damn-near immediately, and try to hit that three to five visit sweet spot.

This strategy no doubt worked, and people got better, but I had noticed I’d get repeat customers. Maybe it wasn’t the area that was initially hurting them, but they still were having trouble creep up. Or maybe it was the same pain, just taking much more activity to elicit the sensation.

It became clear that I was skipping steps to try and get my visit number low, when in reality I was doing a disservice to my patients. This was the equivalent of fast food PT—give them the protein, carbohydrates, and fats, forget about the vitamins and minerals.

If fast food PT fits your macros tho right?!?!

Was getting someone out the door in 3 visits for me or for them? The younger, big ass ego me, wanted to known as the guy who got people better faster than everyone else. Yet the pursuit became detrimental to the patient’s best interest. There were so many other ways I could impact a patient’s overall health that I simply sacrificed in place of speed.

I only got them to survive without pushing them to thrive.

I see a lot of individuals proudly proclaim how many visits it takes for them to get someone out of pain, but pain relief is only part of the equation. There are so many more qualities we can address before we consider a rehab program a success.

This stark realization has reconceptualized how I structure a weekly rehab program. I now emphasize all qualities necessary to return to whatever task the patient desires, and attempt to inspire them beyond those initial goals.

You want to know what my visit average is right now?

I stopped counting, and started treating.

Let’s look designing the rehab week to take your clients to the next level.

Continue reading “How to Design a Comprehensive Rehab Program”

Movement Debrief Episode 1: Meet the Patient at Their Story

A Live Movement Video Series

Hey party people.

I recently started doing some live feeds on the interwebz. You can check me out on Facebook and Youtube if you want to see me live.

Otherwise, I thought I’d share with the very first episode of “Movement Debrief.”

Here we dive into the following topics:

  1. The importance of reflection
  2. Using similar language to the patient.
  3. De-threatening that language
  4. Restoring sagittal plane control
  5. A case for manual therapy

Enjoy!

The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains

A Humdinger No Doubt

 

Ankle sprains. Such a bugger to deal with.

Worse than childbirth, as David Butler might say.

 

Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries seen in basketball. The cutting, jumping, contact, fatigue, and poor footwear certainly don’t help matters.

Damn near almost every game someone tweaks an ankle.

Treating ankle sprains in-game provides quite a different perspective. Rarely in the clinic do we work with someone immediately post-injury. Instead, we deal with the cumulative effects of delayed treatment: acquired impairments, altered movement strategies, and reduced fitness.

The pressure is lower and the pace is slower.

You shed that mindset with the game on the line. You must do all in your power to get that player back on the court tonight, expediting the return process to the nth degree.

I had a problem.

Figuring out the most efficient way to treat an ankle sprain was needed to help our team succeed. I searched the literature, therapeutic outskirts, and tinkered in order to devise an effective protocol.

The result? We had 12 ankle sprains this past season. After performing the protocol, eight were able to return and finish out the game. Out of the remaining four, three returned to full play in two days. The last guy? He was released two days after his last game.

It’s a tough business.

The best part was we had no re-sprains. An impressive feat considering the 80% recurrence rate¹.    Caveats aside, treating acute injuries with an aggressive mindset can be immensely effective.

Here’s how. Continue reading “The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains”

Course Notes: Cantrell’s Impingement and Instability, 2015 Edition

Third Time’s a Charm

 A trip home and hearing Mike Cantrell preach the good PRI word? I was sold.

The power of the ultimate orthotic compels you
The power of the ultimate orthotic compels you

Impingement and Instability is one of those courses that I could take yearly and still get so many gems. In fact, I probably will end up taking it yearly—it’s that good.

I took I&I last year with Cantrell (and the year before that with James), and the IFAST rendition was a completely different course.

Cantrell provided the most PRI clinical applications I have seen at any course, which is why he continues to be one of my favorite people to learn from.

Basically, if you haven’t learned from Mike yet, I pity you. Get to it!

And especially missing it with this group. Come on people!
And especially missing it with this group. Come on people!

I have way too many gems in my notes to discuss, so here are a few big takeaways. Continue reading “Course Notes: Cantrell’s Impingement and Instability, 2015 Edition”

Course Notes: PRI Interdisciplinary Integration 2015

A Stellar Symposium

Back in April I had the pleasure of finally attending PRI’s annual symposium, and what an excellent learning experience.

The theme this year was working with high-powered, extension-driven individuals.

The amount of interdisciplinary overlap in each presentation made for a seamless symposium. Common themes included the brain, stress response, HRV, resilience, and drive. These are things altered in individuals who are highly successful, but may come at a cost to body systems.

If you work with business owners, CEOs, high-level athletes and coaches, high level positions, straight-A students, special forces, and supermoms, this symposium was for you.

Or a combination thereof
Or a combination thereof

And let’s face it; we are both in this category!

There were so many pearls in each presentation that I wish I could write, but let’s view the course a-ha’s.

The Wise Words of Ron

Ron Hruska gave four excellent talks at this symposium regarding high performers and occlusion. Let’s dive into the master’s mind.

Enter at your own risk. Shizzzaahhhh
Enter at your own risk. Shizzzaahhhh

People, PRI does not think extension is bad. Extension is a gift that drives us to excel. Individuals who have high self-efficacy must often “over-extend” themselves. This drive often requires system extension.

Extension is a consequence, and probably a necessary adaptation, of success.

If this drive must be reduced to increase function and/or alter symptoms in these individuals, we have to turn down the volume knob.

How can we power down these individuals?

  1. Limit alternate choices – These folks take a wide view of a task
  2. Set boundaries – These folks attribute failure to external factors
  3. Making initial tasks successful – So these folks don’t give up at early failures
  4. Objectively measure improvement – This helps motivate people to continue
  5. Establish rhythmic activity that reflects specific set goals – the higher the goals the more likely the positive change.
PRI, we have a bobsled team
PRI, we have a bobsled team

A Tale of Two Forward Heads

We discussed a lot of attaining neutrality at the OA joint. What does that entail?

A: Both occipital condyles centered in the atlas fossa with unrestricted lateral flexion.

What is needed to have that?

  1. 55-60 degrees of cervical extension.
  2. Equal bilateral first rib rotation position.
  3. Centric occlusion with the anterior teeth guiding protrusive movement and canines guiding lateral movement.
  4. Normal maxillary and mandibular teeth contact.
  5. Ability to nasal breathe.
  6. Alternating pelvic capability.
  7. Visual flexibility.
  8. Normal hearing bilaterally.

Lose any one of these and a forward head posture may occur.

The two types of FHP we see include one with the atlas migrating forward with increased cervical flexion and occipital protraction.

Forward-Head-Posture

 

And one in which the atlas migrates backward on the occiput in which excessive upper cervical flexion coupled with lower cervical/upper thoracic hyperextension.

images

With the former’s case, these individuals have a harder time feeling posterior teeth; a loss of frontal plane. When one loses frontal plane, the individual must attempt to increase anterior guidance via extension. Strategies used to do this include tongue thrusting, bruxism, fingernail biting, mouth breathing, clenching, etc. These strategies are protective in nature as they limit potential stress at the TMJ and OA.

Most of the latter include your bilaterally extended individuals. They retrude the atlas to significantly increase cervical stability. This hyperstability allows for dominant performance in the sagittal plane. These individuals may need more visual interventions.

 

She’s a Wise Woman

Dr. Heidi Wise gave one of my favorite presentations of the symposium. She discussed vision’s role in extension-driven individuals.

Vision is the most dominant sensory modality, as it has the ability to override all other senses to redirect attention. To me, this is why vision is such a powerful way to get someone neutral.

Redirection of attention through the visual system occurs through saccades. These eye movements occur 85% of the time our eyes are being used. This is how the visual system detects a salient stimulus.

If visual processes hold someone in an extension pattern, it may become extremely difficult to near-impossible to overcome.

Here is how we start thinking a visual process may be promoting an extension pattern:

  • Those who cannot inhibit extension with traditional floor-up activity.
  • Late-onset (past puberty) or severe near-sightedness.
  • People with extremely good eyesight.
  • Folks who over-focus on objects straight ahead (people who stare).
  • People who walk with purpose (makes me think of my mom in the mall!).
  • High-energy.
Probably more than just a vision patient.
Probably more than just a vision patient.

If someone over focuses (read: nearsighted), eye exploration is minimized. It becomes much harder to notice change, or salience. This is how the visual system can keep someone stuck in a stress response.

What is needed to see close?

  • Increases in acetylcholine and norepinephrine.
  • Reflexive increase in neck/head muscle tension. More so if one must strain to see.

Do this too long, and we can see unfavorable autonomic, visual, and neuromuscular stress.

And guess what visual field research is showing we better attune to? The right side; more specifically, the right upper visual field.

The PRI goal? We want to restore ambient vision in these individuals to process three planes of visual motion.

Here were some of Heidi’s recommendations for how to do so.

  1. Take breaks from a task to move.
  2. Be aware of surroundings on both sides without looking when walking.
  3. Walk slower than usual.
  4. Look around using your eyes independent of your head.
  5. If nearsighted, take glasses off occasionally and “be OK” with things far away being blurry. Don’t strain to see well.
  6. Have top of computer screens at about eye level. Look far from the screen as often as possible.
  7. Close eyes and visualize a large open area that makes you calm.
  8. Minimize time on small, close screens and keep object far from eyes.
  9. Read books over e-readers and keep the book as far away as visually comfortable.
  10. Emphasize peripheral awareness before and after high attention tasks.
  11. Change variable such as sounds or environment during high attention tasks.
  12. Get away from looking in the mirror at movements.
  13. Change lightbulbs to natural daylight.
heidi
And Heidi’s as well

 

Mental Muscle

Dr. Todd Stull provided a lot of neat neuroscience nuggests.

  • Glia purges our brain of waste during sleep.
  • Strongest memories are tied to emotions; more negative than positive.
  • If the limbic system is too active (such as in a threatening environment), prefrontal cortex activity goes way down. You can’t learn as well.
  • Cranial nerves are extremely important in social interaction. Nonverbal cues from these areas can unconsciously affect autonomics.
  • During adolescence (12-25) the right side of the brain and limbic system develop faster than the left and neocortex. This lateralization is why this time period can be so emotion-driven.
  • Face to face interaction is needed to cultivate the nervous system. This is the problem with social media and texting.
  • Dopamine pathways are very active during adolescence; it’s one of the reasons addictions start during this time.
  • Feelings of being overwhelmed are 6 times more common in those who have had concussions.
  • Rehearse making mistakes and how you will come out of them.

He also provided some great patient interaction nuggets that I hope to liberally steal.

  • Keep your eyes on the individual and tell them “it’s great to see you here.”
  • If you are not doing well on a given day – “I don’t feel good today but we’re going to have a good session.”
  • If you are at odds with a patient – “We’ve seemed to come to a roadblock. Would you agree?”
Ya don't say?
Ya don’t say?

 

Optimizing Mindsets 

My big takeaway from psychologist Dr. Tracy Heller’s talk was mindfulness.

Mindfulness is something I am hoping to get more into in the future. She defines it as being aware of your thoughts, emotions, physical sensations, and actions in the present moment without judging or criticizing yourself or your experience.

It’s a big deal to have this capability. Practicing mindfulness has been shown to reduced cortisol, stress, pain, depression, and anxiety; while also improving memory, sleep, and cognitive function.

The way we build mindfulness is basically letting go. I like the analogy that I heard while using Headspace (a great app if you haven’t used it). Imagine your thoughts and feelings as cars in traffic. Your goal is to just watch the cars pass by, not chase them. You want to be present in the moment, as we want in most of life.

And if you can do this in LA you'll put most Tibetan monks to shame.
And if you can do this in LA you’ll put most Tibetan monks to shame.

One option of practicing this is resonant frequency breathing, in which we perform 4.5-7 breath cycles per minute. Let the body breathe on it’s own and let the air come in; using terms such as “let,” “allow,” and “permit.” These are cues I have been using much more with patients and has made a big difference.

 

Dad’s Part

This was easily my favorite part of the symposium (I may be biased since my Dad gave this talk). Bill Hartman blew it out of the park teaching us how PRI applies at the highest level of performance.

The rules change in the performance realm because the patterns are incredibly powerful, effective, and efficient. In some cases we may want them. A perfect example that Bill gave: Usain Bolt

Rarely does he cross midline when he runs, making him the fastest runner on one leg. Do we want to change that? Probably not.

Performance does not equal health. Gymnasts for example, may need to create pathology to perform at a high level. Some people must utilize passive elements to produce greater outcomes. Usain Bolt runs on one leg. Everyone is a case-by-case basis. N=1 forever.

What must occur in the performance and health realm is stress management. Acute stressors with recovery make us antifragile; prolonged stressors reduce variability as an allostatic adaptation.

If one must constantly perform at a very high level, where will they be on this stress dichotomy? Prolonged stressors = reduced variability, sympathetic dominance, and system extension.

Variability helps us anticipate demand. It helps us become better able to cope with specific environments and recover movement function. The only way we can know if movement variability is present is through assessing the musculoskeletal system

 “The state of the musculoskeletal system is the other end of the brain” ~ Bill Hartman

If stressed or threatened, body systems use default reflexive mechanisms to combat threat. The brainstem is much faster than the cortex. As a consequence, variability can be lost.

Attaining increased prefrontal cortex activity allows us to inhibit our default response and increase variability. That’s why mindfulness increases HRV, and that’s why a 90/90 hip lift can alter body position.

And why juggling gets Bill neutral. Chainsaws preferred.
And why juggling gets Bill neutral. Chainsaws preferred.

To better manage stress, we must train. Training is a progressive desensitization of threatening input to allow an athlete to perform at adaptive potential with optimal variability and without fatigue.

The higher performance level required, the more difficult it becomes to get neutral. This is what happens during functional overreaching. You gain higher performance output during this timeframe because the sympathetic nervous system and HPA axis are on overdrive.

Applying Bill’s principles along the training and rehab continuum, rehab requires neutrality and variability to rebuild a failed stress tolerance. The amount needed in performance realm will depend on how (in)variant one’s sport is.

The Wild World of Combat

Dallas Wood and Zach Nott work with in a military population, and it was fascinating showing how they mitigate the extension necessary for their clientele to perform. They guys collect a lot of data, and the fun factoid was that about 80-90% of their individuals are PEC and bilateral BC (surprise surprise).

They showed us a very cool auditory case. They had a dude with a PEC/BBC presentation with a history of ear trauma and tinnitus. When they blocked his left ear the gentleman was completely neutral.

A viable treatment in probably more cases than you'd think.
A viable treatment in probably more cases than you’d think.

Treatment underwent reducing the tinnitus by implementing a hearing aid that uses various white/pink noises to slowly reduce tinnitus. Not sure exactly how it works, but this was exciting to hear about (ha). I look forward to learning where PRI takes auditory integration.

 

C’est Fini

 So there you have it. I already signed up for next year’s symposium because this one was so much fun. I look forward to more of the consistently fantastic content that PRI provides. Learn on!