Top 10 Posts of 2017

At the end of each year, I like to see what you beautiful…sexy…outstanding people liked the most from the jazz I be putting out.

I want to understand you. Let me in!!!!

While most of the top 10 were in the exercise-specific realm, I didn’t really see a common trend. It seems as though my fam have eclectic tastes.

It’s probably why we get along so well!

I want to thank you, the fam, for making 2017 an outstanding year. It has been all the comments, questions, stories, and praise that keeps me outputting content for you.

I got some big things planned for 2018, and we may mix up the format a bit, but I think you will like the changes.

But enough rambling. Let’s check out the top 10. First off…

10. Resilient Movement Foundations Course Review

Squat game on point, fam

One of my favorite classes of the year,  put on by my fam from Resilient. Here we learned all the fundamental keys to effective movement, how to perform the big lifts savagely well, and how to use specific movements to improve joint position in these lifts.

Follow these guys, they are some of the biggest stewards of the profession.

9. Practical Pain Education

Chinese version

My thoughts on pain education have morphed a substantial degree over the past year. While I think my understanding of pain’s complexities have enhanced, I’ve worked on simplifying my education paradigms.

I’ve often found that going down the neurophysiological rabbit hole is completely unnecessary, and providing simple examples has led to substantial changes in buy-in and client understanding.

Check this talk out to understand the process, and get my updated thoughts.

8. Recommended Resources

The most thugged out library in physical therapy

Man, fam. I literally just posted this and am amazed to the extent that this post skyrocketed.

Pretty much everything I discuss is not original, but my interpretation of what other incredibly intelligent individuals are saying.

Here are resources that I draw from, and something I hope to continually update and refine.

7. Continuing Education: The Complete Guide to Mastery

This is about as artsy as I get.

When approaching continuing education courses that you really want to learn and understand, there are key processes one must undergo to maximize the learning experience.

Consider this the guide.

6. How to Deadlift: A Movement Deep Dive

Nothing like hitting that 115# 1-RM

Deadlifting is one of my favorite moves for getting all types of gainzzz in the gym. It also happens to be one of my favorite exercises to coach.

When I am thinking deadlift, I am thinking of particular biomechanical processes, coaching cues, and programming tips.

In this deep dive, I highlight all of those pieces to provide my understanding of what is going on with the deadlift.

5. How to Treat Pain with Sitting – A Case Study

Planking was so 2013. Starting the Copenhagen revolution.

I’ve done quite a few online movement consultations this year, and this case study highlights that process

Here, I outlined the entire treatment process and post-treatment reflections. You get a glimpse in terms of what presentations lead me to making particular clinical decisions. If you can understand what compensatory strategies to look for, and what movements can drive favorable change, you can accomplish a lot without even touching someone.

4. The Squatting Bar Reach: A Movement Deep Dive

Not a shorty, but can get low

If there is one thing I’ve improved upon over the last year, especially with working with basketball cats, it’s been squatting.

Squatting is a great fundamental movement that ought to be mastered, and here you’ll learn the art of changing levels.

No vertical tibias here, fam!

3. The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains

Pulling your leg from the beginning.

When you work in basketball, ankle sprains are more the norm than the exception. The sooner you can get the players back on the court, the better chance you have at winning.

I developed a pretty successful protocol to doing just that. Treating acute ankle sprains in this fashion got most peeps to return immediately.

2. 90/90 Hip Lift: A Movement Deep Dive

The amount of photoshopped horrors that could be created from this picture.

If breathing is a part of your program, you probably should have this basic position down pat. If it’s not, srsly?!?!

In this post, I outline the rationale behind the 90/90 hip lift, relevant testing that would implicate it’s usage, and a few different variations you can use with it.

1. He Sleeps He Scores: Playing Better Basketball by Conquering Sleep Deprivation

Much needed after 2017

I guess you guys need some help with sleeping (don’t we all). This post was by far the most popular.

This article discusses my sleep problem that I had with my fellas in the NBA D League, and it was a big one. With early flights and poor travel conditions, sleep was a luxury.

How do you make the most of a terrible situation? Read on to find out, and see the amazing results.

Final Remarks

I want to thank everyone for making my return to blogging a joyous occasion. 2017 was a mixture of failures and successes for me, and you wonderful people have made this transition back to the blogosphere so smooth.

I am forever grateful that you have decided to become fam to this blog, and I look forward to seeing you here next year!

Stay hungry, stay learning, stay moving,

Zac

Resilient Movement Foundations Course Review

I recently had the pleasure of attending a class put on by my fellas at Resilient Performance Physical Therapy.

A jolly old time with old friends and new

I went to this course for a few reasons. First off, I of course support the home team. I can’t even front, Douglas Kechijian, Trevor Rappa, Greg Spatz, and I go way back, and are very much related through IFAST family and directly (Doug is my younger older brother, Trevor is my son, and Greg is my stepson #dysfunctionalfamily).

That said, there is were a couple big things I wanted to take away from this course, which I did in spades:

  • Mastering basic movement
  • Program design

In these two areas, the Resilient fellas delivered in spades. Knowing what good technique is in the basic movement patterns, how to coach, and how to regress, are all underappreciated topics that these guys teach quite well.

So should you take this course? An emphatic hell yes. I give a more indepth review as to why in the video below, so go ahead and check that out.

Once you got the verdict, check out my favorite takeaways in the course notes, and then for the love of God sign up for a course of theirs!

Click here to check out the Resilient Seminar Page

Continue reading “Resilient Movement Foundations Course Review”

Impingement, Trusting Your Assessment, Noncompliance, and the Off-Switch – Movement Debrief Episode 15

If you are beyond sad that you missed last night’s Movement Debrief, number 15, I got your back. This time both audio and video are available #growing up.

Here’s what we talked about:

  • What impingement is
  • How to treat impingement at any joint
  • When do local inputs matter?
  • Trusting your assessment process
  • When to go beyond your assessment process
  • Why context matters
  • Making the most of noncompliant people
  • Dealing with bad situations
  • The importance of having an “off switch”

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

 

Here were some of the links I mentioned in this Debrief.

The 3 Biggest Basketball Conditioning Mistakes

Practical Basketball Conditioning

How to Treat Pain with Sitting – A Case Study

Neurocoffee

 

Death of Vertical Tibia, Usain Bolt, Complex Patients, and More – Movement Debrief Episode 13

Movement Debrief Episode 13 yesterday involved quite a few rants. Must’ve been the ketones talking.

Here’s what we talked about:

  • Restoring sensation with my patient with low back pain
  • Why it’s okay to have an angled tibia during squatting
  • Would any intervention help/hurt Usain Bolt?
  • The complexity of Usain Bolt
  • Struggling with a complex patient
  • Dealing with uncertainty
  • Embracing the struggle

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. (occasionally) They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

Here were some of the links I mentioned in this Debrief.

How to Deadlift – A Movement Deep Dive

Squatting Bar Reach – A Movement Deep Dive

The Sensitive Nervous System – Read my book notes here

Clinical Neurodynamics- Read my book notes here

A Study of Neurodynamics: The Body’s Living Alarm

Mobilisation of the Neuroimmune System – Read the course notes here

Explain Pain– Read the course notes here

Extreme Ownership

The Obstacle is the Way

Ego is the Enemy

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

Stress Response, Proximal First, Sensation Loss, and Your Health – Movement Debrief Episode 12

Let me guess, you are devastated you missed last night’s Movement Debrief.

You should be. It was by far the most interactive debrief we had yet. Loved how active everyone was, and definitely some people help me get better.

Kudos to Steve, Jo, Yonnie-Pooh, and the many others who commented on today’s Debrief.

Here’s what we talked about:

  • How the stress response impacts many areas
  • Treatment hierarchies
  • How to restore sensation loss post-surgery
  • Functional Medicine
  • Why taking care of your health helps others

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. (occasionally) They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

Trial and Error, Triplanar Movement, Networking, and Mentors – Movement Debrief Episode 11

Did you miss yesterday’s Movement Debrief? We had a lot of fun. The first time I went on facebook, twitter, and Instagram simultaneously.

This debrief was a bit different, as it didn’t involve as much reflection on my patient care, but more on the wonderful continuing education weekend I had.

I got to spend time with all my friends learning about a lot of different things. And it led to some great reflections.

Here’s what I talked about:

  1. Why trial and error is important
  2. Being outcome-focused
  3. How triplanar movement impacts single plane movements
  4. Why having a good network is important
  5. Keys the networking
  6. The importance of mentors

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

 

 

How to Design a Comprehensive Rehab Program

Just when I thought I was out, the clinic pulls me back in.

Though I’m glad to be back. There’s just a different vibe, different pace, and ever-constant variety of challenges that being in the clinic simply provides. This has been especially true working in a rural area. You see a much wider variety, which challenges you to broaden your skillset.

I’m amazed at how much working in the NBA has changed the way I approach the clinic.

Previously, I was all about getting people in and out of the door as quickly as possible; and with very few visits. I would cut them down to once a week or every other week damn-near immediately, and try to hit that three to five visit sweet spot.

This strategy no doubt worked, and people got better, but I had noticed I’d get repeat customers. Maybe it wasn’t the area that was initially hurting them, but they still were having trouble creep up. Or maybe it was the same pain, just taking much more activity to elicit the sensation.

It became clear that I was skipping steps to try and get my visit number low, when in reality I was doing a disservice to my patients. This was the equivalent of fast food PT—give them the protein, carbohydrates, and fats, forget about the vitamins and minerals.

If fast food PT fits your macros tho right?!?!

Was getting someone out the door in 3 visits for me or for them? The younger, big ass ego me, wanted to known as the guy who got people better faster than everyone else. Yet the pursuit became detrimental to the patient’s best interest. There were so many other ways I could impact a patient’s overall health that I simply sacrificed in place of speed.

I only got them to survive without pushing them to thrive.

I see a lot of individuals proudly proclaim how many visits it takes for them to get someone out of pain, but pain relief is only part of the equation. There are so many more qualities we can address before we consider a rehab program a success.

This stark realization has reconceptualized how I structure a weekly rehab program. I now emphasize all qualities necessary to return to whatever task the patient desires, and attempt to inspire them beyond those initial goals.

You want to know what my visit average is right now?

I stopped counting, and started treating.

Let’s look designing the rehab week to take your clients to the next level.

Continue reading “How to Design a Comprehensive Rehab Program”

Movement Debrief Episode 1: Meet the Patient at Their Story

A Live Movement Video Series

Hey party people.

I recently started doing some live feeds on the interwebz. You can check me out on Facebook and Youtube if you want to see me live.

Otherwise, I thought I’d share with the very first episode of “Movement Debrief.”

Here we dive into the following topics:

  1. The importance of reflection
  2. Using similar language to the patient.
  3. De-threatening that language
  4. Restoring sagittal plane control
  5. A case for manual therapy

Enjoy!

The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains

A Humdinger No Doubt

 

Ankle sprains. Such a bugger to deal with.

Worse than childbirth, as David Butler might say.

 

Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries seen in basketball. The cutting, jumping, contact, fatigue, and poor footwear certainly don’t help matters.

Damn near almost every game someone tweaks an ankle.

Treating ankle sprains in-game provides quite a different perspective. Rarely in the clinic do we work with someone immediately post-injury. Instead, we deal with the cumulative effects of delayed treatment: acquired impairments, altered movement strategies, and reduced fitness.

The pressure is lower and the pace is slower.

You shed that mindset with the game on the line. You must do all in your power to get that player back on the court tonight, expediting the return process to the nth degree.

I had a problem.

Figuring out the most efficient way to treat an ankle sprain was needed to help our team succeed. I searched the literature, therapeutic outskirts, and tinkered in order to devise an effective protocol.

The result? We had 12 ankle sprains this past season. After performing the protocol, eight were able to return and finish out the game. Out of the remaining four, three returned to full play in two days. The last guy? He was released two days after his last game.

It’s a tough business.

The best part was we had no re-sprains. An impressive feat considering the 80% recurrence rate¹.    Caveats aside, treating acute injuries with an aggressive mindset can be immensely effective.

Here’s how. Continue reading “The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains”

Course Notes: Cantrell’s Impingement and Instability, 2015 Edition

Third Time’s a Charm

 A trip home and hearing Mike Cantrell preach the good PRI word? I was sold.

The power of the ultimate orthotic compels you
The power of the ultimate orthotic compels you

Impingement and Instability is one of those courses that I could take yearly and still get so many gems. In fact, I probably will end up taking it yearly—it’s that good.

I took I&I last year with Cantrell (and the year before that with James), and the IFAST rendition was a completely different course.

Cantrell provided the most PRI clinical applications I have seen at any course, which is why he continues to be one of my favorite people to learn from.

Basically, if you haven’t learned from Mike yet, I pity you. Get to it!

And especially missing it with this group. Come on people!
And especially missing it with this group. Come on people!

I have way too many gems in my notes to discuss, so here are a few big takeaways. Continue reading “Course Notes: Cantrell’s Impingement and Instability, 2015 Edition”