How to Organize Journals, Blogs, and Articles

You wake up, make your bed, do your ahem, bathroom business, then slowly sulk your way to the kitchen to get some coffee brewing.

While the good stuff brews, you open up your computer and decide to check what’s going on in the good old internet today.

Then it happens.

You see 20 new blogs on your blogroll, Facebook has shared 13 different posts that sound unbelievable, but oh wait, check out that tweet showing Tim Ferriss finally interviewed Zac Cupples (#dreaming), and then oh snap, Eminem just dropped another new song on Spotify!

And then you accomplish nothing.

Except listening to the new Eminem, that will always be a worthwhile accomplishment

I see this problem time and time again with many of the mentees that I work with, and I occasionally fall into the trap myself. We see so many interesting articles coming out on a regular basis, and the pull from FOMO is real.

With so much to consume and so little time, what are we to do?

The short answer: consume at the right time.

Yes, the learning process has to involve impeccable timing with consumption. I’ve spoken about just in time learning ad nauseam (here and here), and it is key to both solving problems and retentaining new information.

Consuming a cornucopia of random posts, articles, podcasts, and Youtube videos without direction is a recipe for time wasting.  You fleet from one cool article to the next and…oh wait, what was that last article about?

We’ve all been there, and the struggle is real.

So how do we overcome this nerd FOMO that we all at some point give into?

What we have to do is give in to that little dopamine hit that comes with every click, but repurpose what we do what the new information.

Instead of consumption, we shift to accumulation.

The Death of Consumption

When you accumulate and store articles, posts, etc, you not only satisfy your nerd craving, but also build an arsenal of things to reference when the learning time is right.

Here is an example of one of my accumulation folders that I have for research on a specific topic.

Locked and loaded.

One of my future areas of study is going to be in nutrition, because I know how powerful supportive nutrition can be, but it’s just not in the cards for me right now.

When I come across a study that sounds incredibly intriguing, I sock it away in the nutrition folder, knowing that I’ll be able to pull that relevant study when the time is right.

Or perhaps a better article will come out that makes the former study irrelevant, which means I save time by trashing the outdated article.

It is this accumulation, this nerd stockpiling, that has me prepared to dive into any topic at a moment’s notice.

I call it, Zacmed™.

All rights reserved. Sadly, there is nothing right about me.

Here is how you can build your own.

Research Mining 101

Research accumulation where I spend a bulk of my stockpiling time. Gotta stay #EBP if ya know what I’m sayin’.

This process works not just for journal articles, but basically any downloadables. That means ebooks, powerpoints, JPEGs, anything goes through this process.

Here are the mining steps.

Step 1: Subscribe to journal article email alerts

This piece is critical. It’s hard to keep up with the latest and greatest of research with just a Pubmed search. Hell, you may not even know what keywords to look for.

If Pubmed searching is shopping on Amazon, email alerts is going to Barnes and Noble. Yes, you limit your selection, but your browsing can be much more focused. Fewer options make for easier selection.

If you want a quick an easy way to subscribe to mulitple journal alerts, get a free account at ScienceDirect. Just sign up, go to manage alerts, and you are in business.

Journal selection is going to be totally dependent on what you do and what trips your trigger, but here is a list of the journal I subscribe to (I’ll add more as time goes on, I sometimes forget which ones I subscribe to):

Journal of Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy

International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy

British Journal of Sports Medicine

Sleep

Thorax

Frontiers in (way too many of them)

The Lancet

New England Journal of Medicine

Journal of American Medical Association

Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology 

Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

Another possible option is scouring social media, which I sometimes do, but you have to watch not getting sucked down cat videos for multiple hours.

Yeah. It’s a lot of possible information coming into your inbox, but the key to not being overwhelmed is in the screening process.

Step 2: Screen the email alerts

Once the floodgates open on your email alerts, you must slow the information flow by properly screening useful studies.

The simple solution is to scan the titles. If your interest is piqued, click on the article, scan the abstract, then decide whether or not you need to pursue article acquisition.

I try to get each email done in under 60 seconds. If nothing is intriguing, delete.

Step 3: Project PDF Procurement

Now the fun begins. Many journals will have open access (yay), some you may have to go with like a google scholar or other type of search to get access (meh), and of course you’ll have some brilliant pieces that deny easy access (boo).

How’s a fam supposed to stay #EBP in this case?

Well I can’t tell you directly how to get article access, but this blog does a great job of explaining the many different ways you can retrieve articles. Some legal, some well, more along the Robin Hood side of acquisition. It’s your conscience, not mine.

Once you get the “physical” article copy, move on to step four.

Step 4: Place the PDF in the organized folder

Here is the key. As you are downloading articles left and right, you need a place to store them. Download Dropbox and get your 1TB subscription, that way you can access the articles whenever you so desire.

From here, I have 3 folders in which I place my articles:

  • Reading List – Articles I haven’t read
  • Highlights – Articles I’ve read, but haven’t formalized into my notecard system
  • Evidence – Articles I’ve read and that made it to the notecard system

Organize each folder based on the topic of study. Again, this will be individualized, but here is a look at what my reading list folder looks like:

If you have to ask what’s in the PR. Davidson folder, you can’t afford it.

In order to  simplify titles on my notecards and expedite study retrieval for reviews, I have a classification system I use. Like some Dewey Decimal kinda stuff #throwback.

Say I read an article that’s in the ACL folder. I’ll then retitle that ACL7 (if it’s the 7th article I’ve read), then any notecards attributed to that article will have ACL7 in the title space.

Step 5: Scour the folder when a problem arises

Here is the implementation and consumption part. Once you have a problem or question, you browse related folders, pick titles that seem like they would help you, read, and repeat. This is exactly the process I went through for my pain and breathing talks.

Saving Blogs and Articles

The process is a bit different for internet articles; namely because it’s a bit more work to get “physical” copies. For these, I have a few separate strategies.

But first, how do I access blogs?

I have two means of getting blog access. One is email subscriptions. Not only with these do you get access to exclusive content, but generally if products come out from people you respect, you’ll get some solid discounts. Definitely worthwhile.

I also have an RSS feed through Feedly. Here I can see all the newest blogs that my peeps have put out, and it makes reading selection go much faster. If a post is irrelevant to my tastes, I can checkmark that I read it, and it goes away.

If the post is relevant, then I have a couple options:

Option 1: Read/skim immediately

The only reason I do this is because I want to share current stuff with my newsletter fam. Unless it’s like something super fascinating. Sometimes you have to give in. People write interesting stuff it turns out.

If something really resonates with me, and I need to know it for later, I’ll notecard it immediately or take notes on Google Keep and notecard later.

Option 2: Download to Evernote

This is by far my favorite option and most used. If there is a post or article that I know I want to read, but don’t have time when it comes out, I’ll simply copy the text and paste it to Evernote.

What’s nice about this strategy is that I can then read the article offline on any device, greatly enhancing portability.  And if you are a Feedly user, you can save the article immediately to Evernote.

Pocket is also another potential option, but what’s nice about Evernote is I can categorize articles in a manner similarly to what I do for research articles. That way when a topic comes up, I just go through Zacmed™ and Zacnote™ for inspiration.

Coming to an app store near you

Sum Up

Accumulating and categorizing is the key to saving time, staying focused, and being prepared when a problem comes your way.

To summarize:

  • Accumulate first, consume second
  • Subscribe to journal alerts
  • Design categorical systems to place your information
  • Scour when the time is right

What strategies do you use to accumulate knowledge? Comment below and let us know!

Photo Credits

Pixabay

Wikimedia Commons (modified by yours truly)

Flickr (modified by yours truly)

My Feature on Mike Robertson’s Physical Preparation Podcast

I was recently featured on my boi Mike Robertson’s Physical Preparation Podcast.

It was quite surreal to be interviewed by a guy who I have tremendous respect for, and who has been a huge influence on me.

MR was one of the people who I was initially exposed to when I got into this field. After reading all the cool things he wrote on t-nation, I bought most of his products, became a huge reader of his blog, and applied many of his teachings to my own training.

Zac = fanboy.

Can you imagine what it was like the first time I met him and Bill at IFAST? Like meeting rockstars, fam. Then he we are, having a conversation as peers.

Point being with this story, if there was no Mike Robertson, we wouldn’t be having this conversation right now.

The Life of A Mercenary PT

All types of mercenary shit

Here were some of the things we discussed in this podcast:

  • How I got started in the world of physical prep.
  • What life is really like in the NBA/D-League, and what it’s like to transition from therapy to performance at the highest level.
  • What skills I was comfortable with, and how he grew and evolved to take his coaching skills to the next level.
  • My biggest struggles in pro sports.
  • Movement Variability: What it is, and why you probably need more of it.
  • What it’s like to transition from the biggest stages in sport, to working in a smaller setting with a more general population.
  • How I get it all done – from working as a mercenary PT, to writing, to public speaking, etc.
  • The BIG Question.
  • A really fun lightning round where we discuss pops Daddy-o Bill Hartman, his favorite hip hop groups, why I started the Movement Debrief, and what’s up next for me.

Click here to listen to the podcast.

ZAC CUPPLES ON THE LIFE OF A MERCENARY PT

 

October Links and Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets.

Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on from this past August.

If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend.

Biggest Lesson of the Month

Life ought to focus on creating value, for the people you work with, for others, for the world, for yourself. When you create value, rewards will come.

Quote of the Month

“Common 99% thinking won’t get you uncommon 100% results” ~ MJ Demarco

MJ Demarco is becoming one of my favorite authors, and he inspired the biggest lesson above.

Hike of the Month

A great park in the land of China

I didn’t get much hiking in this past month, namely because I was prepping for my talks in the land of China. However, while in China, my hotel was right next to this really cool park that I walked through frequently. Amazing amalgamation of architecture, flora, and people.

Training

The Trick to a Perfect Rear Foot Elevated Split Squat

My son, Trevor Rappa, gave us a great cue on nailing the rear foot elevated split squat. Perfect for those people who sag into the back leg.

Weight Position During the Squat

Want to more effectively load the legs when you are squatting? Here is one of the most impactful changes I’ve made when coaching squats.

Rehab

Blog: Should We Delay Range of Motion After a Total Shoulder Replacement?

Mike Reinold is a guy who I look to on a lot to influence my post-operative care. In this post, he makes a salient point regarding the early range of motion controversy. The devil is in the details.

Blog: All Gain, No Pain Knee Pain Solution for Lunges and Split Squats

Daddy-O Pops Bill Hartman just killing it with the content, fam. This time around, he discusses how he approaches individuals who get knee pain during split stance activities; a common problem I’ve struggled with in the past. Thank you for helping a son out, pops.

Infographic: Early versus Delayed Rehabilitation After Acute Muscle Injury: No Time to Waste

Yann again killing it with these graphics. Here this time he brings us a study which shows how drastic an impact recovery from an injury can be the sooner you start moving.

Health & Wellness

App: Insight Timer

Want to get into mediation but don’t want to spend the buck on Headspace or Calm? Then Insight Timer is your answer. There are several different styles of meditation available in this completely free app.

I will admit, you have to sift through a lot of crap to find the particular meditations that work for you, but once you find one’s that work, you are golden.

My favorites so far are “The Warrior” by Michelle DuVal and Franko Heke 5 Min Guided Meditation

Let me meditate, set it straight

Blog: New Neuroscience Reveals 2 Rituals That Will Make You More Mindful

Eric Barker’s “Barking Up the Wrong Tree” blog is hands down one of my favorite blogs on the internet. He spends a great deal of time researching multitudes of topics, getting quotes from others, and writing about damn interesting material. This time, he discusses meditation, multiple “yous,” and so much more.

Podcast: Dr. Brandon Alleman on Direct Primary Healthcare (The Paleo Solution)

I’ve been binge listening to Robb Wolf’s podcast as of late (a great thing about vacations), and I found this one to be particularly fascinating. Here Dr. Alleman discusses how he is saving healthcare by using a subscription-based system for his patients. It’s quite fascinating how this system is saving his clients, including small businesses, money. I’d definitely check this one out.

Blog: Decrease Rumination and Stress with Movement

I’m a big time ruminator on things. Something I’ve been trying to work on. Here, my boi Seth Oberst discusses how movement can help reduce the urge to ruminate, and how it’s a much better alternative than being on your phone.

Personal Development

Blog: Imposter Syndrome and the Fitness Industry

Man this hit home for me on many levels. My man Dean Somerset wrote an awesome post on what it feels like to experience imposter syndrome, and how all of us have to start from the bottom. It’s about the process, and continuing to grow the process.

Blog: Decision Making, After the Fact

Read this when you think about being critical of someone, your favorite athlete, you spouse, your friend, making a poor decision.

Productivity Tip

I made one simple change to the way I schedule things that has led to drastic improvements in my productivity. What is that change? Check out the quick hit to find out, fam.

Blog: Definining Authenticity

Seth Godin keeps his blogs simple, concise, yet effective. Here he gives us what authenticity is not, and his example for what it is really hit home for me.

Blog: How Answering One Simple Question Can Keep You on Track for Success

Daddy-O Pops Bill Hartman provides us with a great technique at helping you stay on task with your goals. I definitely plan on using this one.

Routines and Measuring 

Routines are a great way to reduce stress, as less decisions have to be made. In order to be successful at reaching a goal, it helps to track progress. Here is how I combine the two.

Book: The Millionaire Fastlane

This book has really hit me hard and made me think about the way I am approaching finances, making money, and many other things. This book will challenge all your preconceived notions about what to do with your money.

Miscellaneous

Book: Barking Up the Wrong Tree: The Surprising Science Behind Why Everything You Know About Success Is (Mostly) Wrong

Eric Barker is one of my favorite bloggers and I am enjoying his book quite a bit. Do you want to find out if nice guys finish last? Or maybe you want to learn from prison inmates how important trust is. He has so many great nuggets in this book that I’m certain you won’t be disappointed.

Music

Every Noise at Once

This is probably one of the coolest things I have ever seen. Want to hear every music genre that has ever existed, then get a Spotify playlist having music within that genre? Because That is exactly what this site does. Un…be…lievable.

 Royce Da 5’9″ – “The Bar Exam 4” 

[WARNING, EXPLICIT CONTENT] Good…Lord…Listen to this. Royce is by far one of my favorite rappers. Like, in my top 10, pushing to get into my top 5. Here is a dope mixtape he put together where he just expresses his lyricism; many on some of your favorite beats.

So…freakin’…underrated

Some of my favorite include “C Dolores,” “Still Waiting,” “Gov Ball,” and “Chopping Block”

Side note: got to meet Royce at a concert with like 10 people. He really is 5’9″. And he’s a cool cat.

Freddie Gibbs – You Only Live 2wice

[WARNING, EXPLICIT CONTENT] Some call him the modern day 2pac, Gangsta Gibbs himself takes street rap to a whole new level. This joint gets him talking about his time he was in jail overseas. It’s a great mix of some serious stuff with his typical gangsta fare. Freddie is currently one of my favorite modern rappers, so please give him a listen. Crushed Glass and Homesick are my favorite two.

Which goodies did you find useful? Comment below and let me know what you think.

Photo Credits

Aashishji

Dominik Lippe (Lipstar) und Yannic Lippe

Iliotibial Band Bullshit, Deciding What to Learn, Hip Internal Rotation, and Structure, function, and pathology – Movement Debrief Episode 23

Movement Debrief Episode 23 is in the books. Here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure.

Here were all the topics (credit Jand80 for the awesome question):

  • Thoughts on the Ober’s test and structures involved
  • Can you stretch the IT band?
  • How to build a thought process
  • The hierarchy of restoring hip motion and where internal rotation fits
  • Do PT’s address structure or function?
  • Are we really testing and seeing pathology?

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 7:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

 

Zac Cupples iTunes                

Here were the links I mentioned tonight

IFAST University

An Anatomic Investigation of the Ober’s Test

Three-Dimensional Mathematical Model for Deformation of Human Fascia 

Enhancing Life

Darkside Strength

Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies:

 

Check out the mentor program

Continuing Education – The Complete Guide to Mastery Guest Post

Hey all,

Won’t be a debrief this week, as I will be in the land of China giving some talks.

But I wanted to make you aware of a guest post I did on On Target Publications, one of my favorite resources for all things rehab and training.

This site, run by the incredible Laree Draper, simply puts out a ton of awesome material from many of the big names in the industry. Some of my favorites on this site include the great Stu McGill and Gray Cook debate, and the Lorimer Moseley pain video. 

The post was a print of my continuing education guide, so go ahead, check it out, and support all the great things Laree is doing for the industry.

Continuing Education – The Complete Guide to Mastery

Scoliosis, Morton’s Neuroma, and Just in Time Learning – Movement Debrief Episode 22

Movement Debrief Episode 22 is in the books. Here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure.

Here were all the topics:

  • Thoughts on Treating Scoliosis
  • Thoughts on Treating Morton’s Neuroma
  • Why I prefer Just in time vs just in case learning

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

                

Here were the links I mentioned tonight

Advanced Integration Day 4: Curvature of the Spine

PRI Advanced Integration

Ipsilateral Hip Abductor Weakness After Lateral Ankle Sprain

Method Strength – Dave Rascoe

Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies:

 

Check out the mentor program

The Guide to Physical Therapy School

So peeps, I’m going on vacation this week.

So instead of a debrief, I present to you the first legit episode of the Zac Cupples show.

I’ll be putting these bad boys out occasionally when I have a topic that I feel would be better to riff on as opposed to discussing in a debrief or writing about.

Here’s an outline of the topics I discussed

  • Reasons to go into physical therapy
  • What to look for in a PT school
  • The goals of physical therapy school
  • What you should take away from school
  • What classes I recommend a student to take

Enjoy!

                

Here were the links I mentioned tonight

All Gain, No Pain

South College Physical Therapy Program

Bill Hartman

Continuing Education: The Complete Guide to Mastery

Explain Pain Course Notes

Therapeutic Neuroscience Education Course Notes

Lorimer Moseley Explain Pain Course Notes

Kettlebell Mashup

FMS Level 2

Ultimate MMA Conditioning

Dermoneuromodulation Course Notes

ART

Dry Needling Course Notes

Spinal Manipulation Institute

A Randomized Trial Comparing Acupuncture, Simulated Acupuncture, and Usual Care for Chronic Low Back Pain

Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies:

Also, check out the mentoring, movement, and training services I offer:

Mentoring, Movement, and Training

August 2017 in Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets.

Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on from this past August.

If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend.

Biggest Lesson of the Month

You must first take care of yourself in all aspects of life before you can adequately take care of others. That includes personally, professionally, health, finances, everything. While I have done well in certain areas, I have lagged in others. This imbalance is one reason why I opted to take a job in a rural location. It has helped me strike a balance in many areas, and has eliminated potential distractions that could deter me from achieving that balance.

Cryptic? Somewhat. But I think about those times that I’ve been sleep deprived and lost patience with my clients. My lack of taking care of myself in that instance limited my capability to take care of others.

Are you taking care of yourself?

Quote of the Month

The only thing that separates successful people from the ones who aren’t is willingness to work very, very hard. ~Unknown

I saw the above quote when I was staying at a hotel before hiking Capitol Reef. The funny thing was separates was spelled wrong…Make sure you also work smart 🙂

Hike of the Month

This was a tough one, as I did both the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and Capitol Reef. While the North Rim was spectacular, an incredibly challenging hike, and was spent with a dear friend of mine, I have to give Capitol Reef the slight edge.

Capitol Reef reminded me a lot of Zion, in the sense that it had varied terrain, very cool rock formations, and free apples!!! All of the big cliffs were on this crazy slant, and it was just cool to see. Plus I didn’t die like I did in the Grand Canyon. Uphill finish = hate life

How do you like them apples? Quite tasty as a matter of fact.

Rehabilitation

 

Blog: Why Physio Discussions Are Just Another Simpson’s Episode

There is just so much right with this post. Douglas going after a huge problem within the movement realm. Instead of uplifting one another, many of us tear each other down. Doug Kechijian explains why this is problematic.

Quick Hit: Check Arm Position if You Have Neck Pain

Many times, neck pain involves neck muscles increasing their accessory breathing function. A quick trick to reduce this function is by altering arm position. Check out if one of these positions alters your symptoms the next time you have neck pain.

Blog: Clinical Mileage

David Butler has been one of my biggest influences, and this post is no different. Here David discusses the Concept of Clinical Mileage, the importance of reflection, reshaping our treatments. I admire, despite all the years he has practice, he continues to evolve his thought process; something we should all aspire to do.

Research:  The Relationship Between Low Back Pain and Lumbar Lordosis: A systematic Review and Meta-analysis

But wait? I thought posture doesn’t cause pain? What about the studies showing imaging pathology in asymptomatic studies?

One thing we don’t consider is the frequency of imaging pathology in individuals with pain. This study is an example of that.

Pain is an experience in which the causes are multifactorial, and that means we cannot discredit how biomechanics can influence that experience.

Research: Knee Osteoarthritis has Doubled in Prevalence Since the mid-20th Century

Your patients with bone-on-bone can officially no longer use the “old age” excuse anymore. Knee osteoarthritis is commonly blamed for our longer lifespan and BMI, but this cadaveric study seems to think otherwise. When comparing the knees of modern people to those of the 18th-19th century (and even some prehistoric knees!), they found that even when lifespan and BMI were controlled for, modern subjects had a 2.1 greater incidence of knee OA. What do they think is the cause? Read it to find out.

 

Performance

Quick Hit: Recovery Position

Want to recover more effectively between intense bouts of exercise? You should probably watch this video. I’ve found with many of my clients that dropping further into a squat enhances heart rate recovery incredibly fast. I used it on my most recent hike, and made many of the hard parts more bearable.

Podcast:  Mike Irr on Winning an NBA Championship

Mike Irr is just a phenomenal human being. And to hear him speak with such poise, such humility, despite being an NBA champion, is refreshing. You’ll also learn a great deal about the successes, failure, and challenges of working in the big leagues. Give the guy a listen.

Might be the goodest dude in the history of good dudes.

Quick Hit: Which Hand Should the Weight be in During Offset Movements?

Should it be the same side or the opposite side of the front leg? Depends on your goal. In this video I discuss when each strategy ought to be implemented.

Health

Infographics: Managing Performance Throughout Periods of Travel: Coping Strategies for Eastward Travelers

for Westward Travelers

Yan Le Meur just keeps killing it with these infographics. Today he eloquently summarizes the essential strategies for effective traveling across multiple timezones. I learned a ton from this series.

Infographic: One Hour of Physical Activity Eliminates the Detrimental Effects of 8 Hours of Inactivity

Wearing my Oura Ring has done wonders for keeping me on task regarding my sleep, activity and readiness levels. It has also made me sickeningly aware of how damn much I sit.

All is not lost, however, as my man Yann Le Meur, who puts out killer infographics, made me aware of this study here. Pretty remarkable that much of the damage of sitting can be offset.

Blog: Why am I So Tired?

Allen Tucker is a dear friend of mine, and he wrote a phenomenal post on all things sleep; drawing from his own experiences with sleep deprivation and sleep apnea. Though he is no medical professional, Allen is a guy with an incredibly broad knowledge base, and my internet endeavors would be nonexistent if it weren’t for him.

Just wish the bastard would write more!

Miscellaneous

Quick Hit: Learning Arsenal

We all have our ways we learn. In this promo I go over some of my tools in my learning toolbox that help me get the most out of my learning endeavors.

Video: All Your Excuses are Lies

Taken from Podcast #83

No one can make you want to be more disciplined than Jocko Willink. He has probably been one of the most influential people that I’ve come across this year. His material is a life changer. His advice is simple, direct, and effective. If you are following his stuff. Quit making excuses and do it!

Blog: You are Who You Grab Coffee With – 3 Steps to Get Expert Advice on Any Topic 

Ramit Sethi is a finance guy whose material I have really been digging. He gives a lot of practical financial advice tips that really resonate with me.

In this post, he discusses how to effectively connect with experts, and definitely have used some of these methods at continuing education courses. I think he outlines effective strategies quite well, and especially love the email template he provides.

One of the many reasons to drink coffee.

Article: What Do Economists Actually Know?

While evidenced based practice and the scientific method are incredibly important, these sources are not infallible. All sources are biased, muddied, difficult to appraise, and occasionally dishonest.

We still operate with a large degree of uncertainty with the people we work with. We can’t hang our hat on research alone, especially when dealing with the complex entities known as humans.

This uncertainty extends beyond medicine and performance, as Russ Roberts discusses the very same problem in his field of economics.

My favorite quote? “Published and true are not synonyms.”

Music

Music: Lush Vibes

As you know, I am a huge hip hop head, but need something to chill out at night and be focused to. This playlist = absolutely incredible for that. Minimal words, very low key beats, and productivity has been spectacular while listening.

Music: Ambient Chill Playlist

I’ve been trying a bunch of different things before bed to enhance my sleep capabilities, as for awhile I was struggling, fam. At night, listening to this bad boy before bed did wonders for calming me down. Also think it’s a solid playlist for productivity. Check it out for sure.

Music: Raekwon “The Wild”

Raekwon the Chef coming on strong with a new album. The beats = fire. The wordplay = fire. The storytelling = fire. You can tell the Chef has grown up quite a bit since his Wutang days, but still represents and reminds us of his sordid past. The joint he did with Lil Wayne; daummmmmn.

A recent systematic review concluded that the Chef is always cooking up fire #science

Music: Twista “Crook County”

I have a soft spot for fast rappers aka choppers, and Twista is the gold standard. For a hot minute he was trying to do the mumble rap, and it wasn’t good. Here Twista gets back to his roots, yet varies his flow enough to show exactly how versatile (and underrated he is). The sound is similar to a lot of new stuff you’ll hear on the radio, but with actually good rappin’. Listen to “Hollywood,” it’ll change your life.

Which goodies did you find useful? Comment below and let me know what you think.

Photo Credits

Mortefot from Flickr

Weekly Dig

D League Readiness Measures, Navigating Flare-ups, and Should I get the OCS? – Movement Debrief Episode 16

Just in case you missed last night’s Movement Debrief Episode 16, here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure.

Here’s what we talked about:

  • What readiness and performance measures I used in the NBA D League
  • What I would’ve done differently?
  • How to navigate a pain flare-up
  • What are the pro’s and con’s of becoming a clinical specialist

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

 

Here were some of the links I mentioned in this Debrief.

How to Design a Comprehensive Rehab Program

How to Treat Pain with Sitting – A Case Study

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July 2017 in Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets.

Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on from this past July.

If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend.

Biggest Lesson of the Month

Maximize proximal before spending time distal. I’ve just seen too many patients where we applied some type of axial intervention, which led to profound changes distally. Position governs all. Thank you for making me realize this daddy-o.

Quote of the Month

Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly. ~Robert Kennedy

Rehabilitation

Blog: What is the Best Test to Discern an ACL Tear?

My boy Scott Gray put together a rock solid post on diagnosing an ACL tear. I’ve been very big as of late on filling the differential diagnosis hole in my game, and this one was beyond helpful. I wish I had heard of the lever test last year when I had a guy pop his ACL in-game.

Blog: The Quadruped Rockback Test: RIP

My buddy Doug Kechijian ever so succinctly puts this dated test to rest. There is so much more that goes into deciding squat depth than can be accurately accounted for with this test.

never question a guy with a loaded gun.

Performance

Research: The effects of two different recovery postures during high intensity interval training

I’m still making my way through this beast. It’s a thesis, but the references and explanations of the science behind breathing, position, and recovery is outstanding. Not only that, but changing your recovery position has had a profound effect on improving my clients’ conditioning.

Video: Lateral Lunge Quick Hit

This was a promo I put out for my 5th Metatarsal RTP podcast. It’s a nice little cue to drive greater frontal plane activity on the non-working leg.

Research: The athlete monitoring cycle: a practical guide to interpreting and applying training monitoring data

So proud of my guy Eric Oetter, who put this incredibly practical guide to load management together with the brilliant Tim Gabbett. EO is doing phenomenal things with the Grizzlies, and this provides a small insight into his process.

Nutrition

Podcast: Does Meat Consumption Cause Cancer? 

Short answer – It depends. I have a coworker who I discuss with the problems of this argument. I’m an avid meat eater because gainzzz, and it turns out that makes the difference. If you aren’t listening to Ronda Patrick by the way, you’re welcome.

Yeah, I’m a meat eater #dealwithit

Podcast: How to Tell if You Have a Leaky Gut

Chris Kresser is a cat I’ve been really getting into as of late. I think there are a lot of cool things within functional medicine, and this guy is one of the most evidenced-based out there.

I think the gut microbiome is a vastly underappreciated area to intervene on. But how do you know if you have a problem? CK tells you how to find out.

Video/podcast: George Brooks, Ph.D on Lactate

This Rhonda Patrick joint talks about all the wonderful things lactate does for us. This molecule always gets a bad rap, but did you know in brain injuries (concussions, TBIs, etc), it’s one of the few substrates that is capable of providing our brain fuel? This was a very fascinating hour in which I learned a great deal.

Research: Fasting, Circadian Rhythms, and Time-Restricted Feeding in Healthy Lifespan

Supplemental Podcast: Satchin Panda Interview

What if I told you that there was a way you could keep eating what you are eating yet still lose fat and gain muscle. Would you do it?

If so, then this is your study. By simply restricting the eating window to 9-12 hours in mice, and having them eat earlier in their day, these bad boys lost some major weight. He did a similar study in humans as well. He goes into detail about this and more. Both the paper and the podcast are quite interesting

Sleep

Video/Podcast: Dan Pardi on Sleep

I’ve been on a little Rhonda Patrick (#bae) kick as of late. In this interview, Dan Pardi talks about all things sleep, circadian rhythms, and more. If you can maximize sleep duration, intensity, and timing, you are winning at life. Never thought of sleep described in this manner.

Quick Hit: Tips for a Better Sleep Environment

Here are some of my keys to creating that ideal sleep environment. There might be a few in here that you didn’t think about. What are your keys?

Finance

Book: The Four Hour Work Week 

An oldie, but a goodie. I’m taking my time with this one because it’s a big book and filled with so many practical applications. This book inspired me to check my email, and respond, less frequently. He’s given me so many ideas on streamlining my life. You’ll love the tips he has for elimination and automation. Incredibly practical.

Blog: Student Loans? What Student Loans? 

Given that I’m pretty green at being a PT mercenary, this website has been gold for me. If this doesn’t inspire you to consider travel PT, nothing will. The money is real, and it seriously feels like I’m on vacation all the time.

Me on the left by the time my student loans are paid off

Book: Roger Dawson’s Secrets of Power Negotiating

I recently had to prepare for a salary negotiation, and just reading a few chapters from this book made the process go exceedingly better than I anticipated. Negotiating, like many things, is a skill. This book will teach you the fundamentals to a skill that will benefit so many aspects of your life.

Miscellaneous

Music: “Handshakes with Snakes” by Apathy (NSFW, and likely offensive to most everyone)

As y’all probably know, I am a major hip hop head. Like, pretty much all that I listen to. I found this cat on Spotify while at the gym, and was blown away. Has fire lyrics over insane samples. Listen to the joint called “Moses” which features Twista and Bun B. Un…be…lievable

Current Book: What If

I’ve lately been trying to read something a bit less technical right before bed to help me fall asleep (which has been working well btw). First book I chose was this gem by the creator of XKCD, Randall Munroe. He basically goes through and answers ridiculous questions in the most scientific manner possible. It’s a brilliant combination of interesting and funny.

My favorite so far? “What would happen if you had a mole of moles?” #deep

Photo credits

Air National Guard

Karim benzeoona

DonkeyHotey