About Me

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Without my mentors, I would be nothing

Studying my craft never came easy to me.

I had to work incredibly hard to learn many scientific concepts in college, with varied successes and failures. Despite continual review, much of the information didn’t stick.

Although I had a knack for orthopedic physical therapy, I wasn’t seeing the results I had hoped for during my clinical rotations. I felt inept, out of place, and lost.

That all changed in Indianapolis.

There I met one of my greatest mentors, Bill Hartman. He helped build my confidence as a clinician, taught me the basic sciences and rehabilitation in an easy-to-learn manner, and gave me outside-the-box solutions to help my patients.

What was most admirable was his discipline and continual desire to learn. These were the most important things I left with.

It is people like Bill and the people we work with that continue driving me to get better. That drove me to attend over 70 continuing education courses my first five years out of school. Inspired me to better my understanding through writing, speaking, and teaching. To put myself in uncomfortable situations so I can grow.

That pushes me to becoming the best me.

This website is a product of that goal. Many clinicians I speak to yearn for a mentor. Someone to hold them accountable. Someone that they can learn from. Someone that has made the mistakes already.

It is my hope to be that for you. Regardless of if you are a clinician, coach, or enthusiast, I’m here to help you reach your goals. I want you to learn through my failures and successes so the journey is accelerated.

The journey to becoming the best you.

Here’s how:

Blog Posts

Drawing from my experience as an NBA therapist and strength coach, I write about all things along the performance continuum: rehab, training, nutrition, sports science, sleep, stress management, and the learning process.

Services

I have yet to write what you are looking for? No problem. Reach out to me about personal mentoring and I can better explain concepts you may have trouble understanding.

Or maybe you are here because you are in pain, having trouble moving, or simply want to get in better shape. Talk to me about a movement consultation or online training. I’ll help you achieve your performance goals.

Videos

I have several videos demonstrating various techniques, exercises, and concepts to help enhance your learning.

Notes

I’ve taken a lot of continuing education and read many books over the years. Maybe you are diving into those subjects as well. Check out my course notes and book notes to help get the most out of what you are learning. They’re like Sparknotes, only nerdier.

Talk to me

Fill out the contact form below if you have any questions, comments, concerns, or complaints. I’m also fairly active on social media, so please check me out there.

Look forward to learning with you.

 

Disclaimer: This blog is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Thoughts are my own. 

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0 Replies to “About Me”

    1. My company doesn’t cover it all, but I am fortunate that they do quite a bit. Otherwise, I budget out of my current expenses, know some of the right people, and work a lot. It’s an investment.

  1. Hi Zac-one of my colleagues forwarded your website to me! You have a wonderful writing style and great sense of humor. I enjoyed reading your take on the NYC course we were at together. Also, my colleague has been sharing your myokin notes with those who are taking PRI course for the first time (I am hosting this weekend in Boston). Remember your first PRI course??

  2. Hi Zac. Thanks for maintaining this interesting site. Just wondering if you have ever come across a neural mobilization technique for the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve? As far as I can tell the NOI techniques for the ulnar nerve address the volar branch only. Thanks, Nick.

    1. Hey Nick,

      It’s great to hear from you.

      I unfortunately have not seen a mobilization techniuqe for the dorsal branch.

      Based on the anatomy of it, I would think the only difference would be at the wrist. To maximally elongate the nerve, you would flex the wrist as opposed to extending. Nothing else should be different at the other joints.

      Great question, making me think tonight hahaha.

      Zac

  3. Hey Zac, did you do your residency at IFAST under Bill? Or did you do it elsewhere and then worked under Bill afterwards? I’m gathering information on whether it is worth it to attend residency as opposed to paying off loans and trying to self-learn once I graduate.

    Thanks,

    Andy

    1. Hey Andy,

      Great to hear from you.

      I did one of my clinicals with Bill (I wish a residency). My residency was with my alma mater St. Ambrose University.

      While I learned a fair amount with the residency, I would recommend the self-learning route. You have more independence in what you can learn that way and are not forced things that aren’t necessarily that good.

      Stay in touch,

      Zac

  4. Hey Zac,

    I will definitely keep in touch. You’re really an inspiration for the field and for a student like me looking to excel in the the field of movement. The notes and overviews you put out are really helpful and inspiring. I’ll definitely be keeping up with you and your work!

    Andy

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