Movement Debrief Episode 1: Meet the Patient at Their Story

A Live Movement Video Series

Hey party people.

I recently started doing some live feeds on the interwebz. You can check me out on Facebook and Youtube if you want to see me live.

Otherwise, I thought I’d share with the very first episode of “Movement Debrief.”

 

Here we dive into the following topics:

1. The importance of reflection

2. Using similar language to the patient.

3. De-threatening that language

4. Restoring sagittal plane control

5. A case for manual therapy

Enjoy!

 

The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains

A Humdinger No Doubt

 

Ankle sprains. Such a bugger to deal with.

Worse than childbirth, as David Butler might say.

 

Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries seen in basketball. The cutting, jumping, contact, fatigue, and poor footwear certainly don’t help matters.

Damn near almost every game someone tweaks an ankle.

Treating ankle sprains in-game provides quite a different perspective. Rarely in the clinic do we work with someone immediately post-injury. Instead, we deal with the cumulative effects of delayed treatment: acquired impairments, altered movement strategies, and reduced fitness.

The pressure is lower and the pace is slower.

You shed that mindset with the game on the line. You must do all in your power to get that player back on the court tonight, expediting the return process to the nth degree.

I had a problem.

Figuring out the most efficient way to treat an ankle sprain was needed to help our team succeed. I searched the literature, therapeutic outskirts, and tinkered in order to devise an effective protocol.

The result? We had 12 ankle sprains this past season. After performing the protocol, eight were able to return and finish out the game. Out of the remaining four, three returned to full play in two days. The last guy? He was released two days after his last game.

It’s a tough business.

The best part was we had no re-sprains. An impressive feat considering the 80% recurrence rate¹.    Caveats aside, treating acute injuries with an aggressive mindset can be immensely effective.

Here’s how. Continue reading “The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains”

Change The Context: 3 Tools to Treat Neck Pain

Basket Case Study

The other day I woke up with some right-sided neck pain. I had some discomfort and slight limitations rotating or sidebending right.

Now I’ve already completed many systemic-oriented treatments, and don’t really have a go-to non-manual for the occasional crick in the neck. I was unable to get any manual therapy, nor were self-mobilizations effective.

What’s a guy to do? Continue reading “Change The Context: 3 Tools to Treat Neck Pain”

How to Design Your Learning Program

Thanks Buddy

The other day I was texting with a friend and writer I respect dearly, Seth Oberst, and he asked me an excellent question regarding the reading process:

How do you determine what you read next though? ~Seth Oberst

I answered him then, though it felt brief and inadequate. His question inspired me to reflect on how I design my learning process.

Though I’ve mentioned my learning philosophy, it may be fruitful to delve into the details. Seth, I hope I don’t let you down. Continue reading “How to Design Your Learning Program”

The 6-Step Method to Reading the Shit Out of Books

What Were We Talking About Again?

If there is one thing I’ve struggled with over the years, it’s long term retention.

Though remembering course materials has had it’s challenges, the struggle is worse with books.

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My next strategy if this doesn’t work.

Overconsumption was part of the problem. Trying to read faster, and across multiple unrelated books caused more detriment than use. Much as our attention spans can be overstimulated by abundant information on the internet, so to can we suffer this fate with reading. There are a lot of books after all.

While narrowing my reading focus has helped quite a bit, improving my reading strategy was equally important.

I remember one summer I made it my goal to learn how to shuffle cards. We played A LOT of cards on my family vacations, and I was tired of having to use the automatic shuffler or having someone else shuffle for me at the family card game.

It was time to become a man, damnit!

I shuffled anytime I had some free time during the day; which back when I was a kid led to multiple bouts of daily shuffling.

By the end of the summer, I was unconscious with shuffling, and still am to this day.

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One might say

Frequent, quality repetitions at any task will likely lead to improvement. Learning material is no different, we must just foster an environment of multiple exposures to said material.

Here’s my latest attempt at doing so. Continue reading “The 6-Step Method to Reading the Shit Out of Books”

Starting from the Bottom (Now We Here): When General Physical Preparation Matters

Professional Nihilism?

After wiping the tears and coming to the stark realization of our (ir)relevance in performance, we must ask where do we fit in? Do we matter?

TheRockPoint
IT DOESN’T MATTER IF WE MATTER!

I’ve asked myself this question many times. It is hard to answer when tactical over-utilization begets repetitive stress injuries; a poor night’s sleep, Slurpies, and donuts make someone ill; or a contact play ends a career. What could I have done differently? What was my role?

Though these questions have required skill development in special physical preparedness, sports science, and stress management; improving general qualities is pertinent in certain scenarios. It is these times in which rehab and training is of utmost importance, and we regain our relevance.

When GPP Matters

Our skills shine in the following instances: Continue reading “Starting from the Bottom (Now We Here): When General Physical Preparation Matters”

Start at the End: A Case for Special Physical Preparedness

“I need to get my wind back.”

Every time I heard this I cringed.

I did all the right stuff returning guys back to sport.

I’m talking getting guys more neutral than Ron Hruska on a tropical island, FMS scores that Gray Cook would be ‘mirin’, hop tests that Kevin Wilk would foam at the mouth over, and high intensity continuous training sessions that would make Joel Jamieson say “really?”

Yet as soon as they got onto the court, they’d be smoked.

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I heard this a lot too. It was pretty funny

I’d hear that cursed phrase over and over again.

What was I doing wrong? I thought we address all of their performance needs, yet we would continually run into the same problem.

It wasn’t until I learned the following axiom that we broke this pattern: Continue reading “Start at the End: A Case for Special Physical Preparedness”

How to Approach Learning

It’s Been Awhile

Hasn’t it?

staind
Bonus points if you said the heading to yourself in tune of that song by Staind.

I was in a place where I couldn’t get much writing done.

I got out of the groove, out of taking one too many con ed courses.

It’s times like this where you have to look somewhere for inspiration.

For me, I looked toward Arnold Schwarzenegger.

I was watching “The Terminator” the other day with my aunt; an incredibly good movie, as all Arnold movie are.

 

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And yes, that includes “Hercules in New York”

Picture the iconic scene where the T-800 is looking for Sarah Connor in the police station, but the officer refuses to let him in. It is then when he drops that iconic line: Continue reading “How to Approach Learning”

Course Notes: PRI Postural Visual Integration: The 2nd Viewing

Would You Look at That

It was a little over a year ago that I took PRI vision and was blown away. A little bit after that, I went through the PRIME program to become an alternating and reciprocal warrior.

I had learned so much about what they do in PRI vision that I was feeling somewhat okay with implementation.

Then my friends told me about the updates they made in this course.

I seriously just took it
I seriously just took it

 

I signed up as quickly as possibly, and am glad I did. This course has reached a near-perfect flow and the challenging material is much more digestible.

Don’t expect to know the what’s and how’s of Ron and Heidi’s operation. And realistically, you probably don’t need to.

Your job as a clinician is to take advantage of what the visual system can do, implement that into a movement program, and refer out as needed. This blog will try to explain the connection between these two systems.

If you want more of the nitty-gritty programming, I strongly recommend reading my first round with this course. Otherwise, you might be a little lost.

Let’s do it. Continue reading “Course Notes: PRI Postural Visual Integration: The 2nd Viewing”

Course Notes: The Val Nasedkin Seminar

A Long Lost Love

 Strength and conditioning is a guilty pleasure of mine. One I love to indulge in from time to time.

There is something about the training process that excites me. So when I heard Val Nasedkin was speaking in the US, I jumped on the opportunity.

Kemosabi-style of course
Kemosabi-style of course

Val is the brilliant mind behind the Omegawave, a device which I have been experimenting with in my own training and hoped to learn more about.

I left with a greater appreciation not only for what Val’s system intends to do, but the way he coaches and programs.

If you get a chance to hear Val or Roman Fomin speak, take up the opportunity. These guys are both revolutionaries in their respective fields.

Here were a few of the big takeaways.

 

Ze Goal

Val created the Omegawave to provide a framework and determine appropriate timing for our current performance methodologies.

Most training and rehabilitation processes are chosen based on results. focusing here, however, neglects individual responses to inputs.

Great results can come at a great cost to an individual.

If biological cost of training can be measured, there is potential to maximize an individual’s health, long term potential, and work capacity, while still achieving desired results. Continue reading “Course Notes: The Val Nasedkin Seminar”