Continuing Education: The Complete Guide to Mastery

75

That’s my number.

No, not that number.

 

Pervert

75 is the number of continuing education classes, conferences, home studies, etc that I’ve completed since physical therapy school.

Though the courses are many, it was probably too much in a short period of time. When quantity is pursued, quality suffers. Sadly, I didn’t figure out how to get the most out of each class until the latter end of my career.

Two classes in particular stand out: Mobilisation of the Nervous System by the NOI Group, and ART lower extremity.

Yes, the content was great, but these classes stood out for a different reason. You see, instead of just doing a little bit of prep work, I kicked it up a notch. I extensively reviewed supportive material, took impeccable notes, and hit all the other essentials needed to effectively learn.

I was prepared, and because I was prepared I got so much more out of these classes than my typical fair.  The lessons learned in those courses stick with me to this day.

For the stuff you really want to learn, I’ll encourage you to do the same. Here is the way to get the most out of your continuing education. By the time you are done reading this post, you’ll understand why I now recommend a more focused learning approach and fewer courses.

Let’s see how to do it.

 

Continue reading “Continuing Education: The Complete Guide to Mastery”

The 6-Step Method to Reading the Shit Out of Books

What Were We Talking About Again?

If there is one thing I’ve struggled with over the years, it’s long term retention.

Though remembering course materials has had it’s challenges, the struggle is worse with books.

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My next strategy if this doesn’t work.

Overconsumption was part of the problem. Trying to read faster, and across multiple unrelated books caused more detriment than use. Much as our attention spans can be overstimulated by abundant information on the internet, so to can we suffer this fate with reading. There are a lot of books after all.

While narrowing my reading focus has helped quite a bit, improving my reading strategy was equally important.

I remember one summer I made it my goal to learn how to shuffle cards. We played A LOT of cards on my family vacations, and I was tired of having to use the automatic shuffler or having someone else shuffle for me at the family card game.

It was time to become a man, damnit!

I shuffled anytime I had some free time during the day; which back when I was a kid led to multiple bouts of daily shuffling.

By the end of the summer, I was unconscious with shuffling, and still am to this day.

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One might say

Frequent, quality repetitions at any task will likely lead to improvement. Learning material is no different, we must just foster an environment of multiple exposures to said material.

Here’s my latest attempt at doing so. Continue reading “The 6-Step Method to Reading the Shit Out of Books”

Explain Pain Section 6: Management Essentials

This is a summary of section 6 of “Explain Pain” by David Butler and Lorimer Moseley.

Management 101

The most important thing you can understand is that no one has the answer for all pains. Pain is entirely individualistic, hence requiring different answers. There are several strategies which one can undertake to triumph over pain.

Tool 1: Education

Knowing how pain works is one of the most important components to overcoming pain. Instead of no pain, no gain, the authors like to use “know pain, or no gain.” Understanding pain is essential for squashing fear of pain, which leads best toward the road to recovery.

Here are some important concepts to be known about explaining pain.

  • Anyone can understand pain physiology.
  • Learning about pain physiology reduces pain’s threat value.
  • Combining pain education with movement approaches will increase physical capacity, reduce pain, and improve quality of life.
And I mean anyone.

Tool 2: Hurt ≠ Harm

It is important to understand that when someone feels pain it does not equate with damage. The same can be said with recurring pains. These pain types are often ways to prevent you from making the same mistake twice. If your brain sees similar cues that were present with a previous injury, the brain may make you experience pain as a way to check on you and make sure you are okay.

Just because hurt does not mean harm does not mean you can get crazy though. Because the nervous system is trying to protect you, it will take drastic measure to prevent re-injury. Therefore, the best option is to gradually increase activity levels without pressing past the nervous system’s threshold.

If only there was a neurosignature that helped me stop drinking Redline. So bad yet so good.

Tool 3: Pacing & Graded Exposure

All the body tissues are designed for movement, therefore this is how we will increase activity. Here are the steps to pacing and graded exposure.

  1. Select an activity you want to do more of.
  2. Find your baseline – The amount of activity you can do that you know will not cause a flare-up. A flare-up is an increase in pain that leaves you debilitated for hours to days.
  3. Plan your progressions.
  4. Don’t flare up, but don’t freak out if you do.
  5. It is a lifestyle change, requiring a little bit more planning.

Take walking for example. Suppose you know you could walk for 5 minutes, but if you did 7 you would pay for it over the next couple days. You might walk for 5 the first day, then 5:15. Eventually, you would work up to past 7 minutes, then so on and so forth.

Access the Virtual Body

Just like the body, the virtual body can be exercised as well. Ways to work on the virtual body are as follows:

  1. Imagine movements – a la graded motor imagery.
  2. Alter gravitational influences or surfaces.
  3. Add varying balance challenges.
  4. Vary visual inputs – Eyes closed challenges the virtual body even more. Use a mirror to give the brain visual input and further decrease threat.
  5. Alter the activity environment.
  6. Move in different emotional states.
  7. Add distractions.
  8. Perform the desired movements in functional activities.
  9. Break down functional movements.
  10. Perform sliders.
  11. Perform movements with the surrounding tissues in relaxed positions that do not hurt.
  12. Work out of your glitches – If you walk with a limp from an ankle you sprained in 1962, try changing how you walk.
  13. Let your mind go.
Open your mind…Open your mind.