Asymmetries, Foot Position, and Educating Practitioners – Movement Debrief Episode 105

Movement Debrief Episode 105 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: Is it more important to correct axial skeleton imbalances or side to side asymmetries? Should we do bilateral lifts to challenge the weak side to “keep up”, or should we perform single sided activities to even things out? How important is foot positioning during resets? What are some strategies to drive calcaneal inversion or eversion? How do you communicate more specific treatment goals with other practitioners who aren’t familiar with your model?

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Rib Rotation, Shoulder Issues, and Biomedical Education – Movement Debrief Episode 98

Movement Debrief Episode 98 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: What does rib external and internal rotation look like? How do I approach improving shoulder mechanics? Any current training considerations for shoulder issues? Why do medical providers often educate in a manner that induces fear-avoidance and fragility? How, as movement professionals, can we deal with these issues?

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Shoes, Self-Correction, and Position Education – Movement Debrief Episode 95

Movement Debrief Episode 95 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: Do I prescribe shoes to people? What do I look for when giving shoe recommendations? How can one self-correct during breathing exercises? How do we know if a breathing exercise is working? If we shouldn’t educate bones going in/out of place, how do I explain joint position and movement options?

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Is it Pain or Discomfort?

Perhaps one of the biggest struggles we can run into in working with people in pain is getting our clients feeling safe when returning to movement. The reality of the matter is that the chances of a person in pain experiencing some symptoms as he or she returns to activity is real and part of the process. How can we get our people to trust the process? To be comfortable being uncomfortable? I think Aline Thompson, a physical therapist I trust out of Denver, has the answer. In today’s post, she outlines how changing the belief frame someone approaches pain with can have profound impacts on returning to life. Without further adieu, here is what she has to say: Is there a Difference Between Pain and Discomfort? There’s a difference and it matters. More often than not the question goes more like this: “Tell me about your pain…” After which you get a pause, with a look of contemplation. When this happens I wonder; what are they thinking? Should that silence be filled with a follow up question? “…. Or is it discomfort?” When I ask folks whether there is a difference between pain and discomfort everyone says yes. When I ask how they differ these are the answers: “Pain is discouraging, Discomfort is just frustrating” – “Discomfort is annoying but you can ignore it. Pain interferes with your brain and thought processes. You can’t do a complex math problem easily when you’re in pain” – “Pain can hinder progress

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Zone of Apposition, Total Hip Replacement, and Client Wants vs Needs – Movement Debrief Episode 74

Movement Debrief Episode 74 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: What is a zone of apposition (ZOA)? How does one attain a ZOA? Are we expected to keep a ZOA at all times? What activities should be focused on after a total hip replacement? What considerations should be made for specific procedures? How do we get patients/clients to focus on things they need vs what they want to do? How can I educate patients/clients better on how certain activities can be beneficial to them?

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Sitting Posture, Hypermobility, and Fear-Avoidance – Movement Debrief Episode 72

Movement Debrief Episode 72 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: Does sitting slouch = extended? Why do people appear flexed when they sit? What is going on when someone sits slouched? How should I work with someone who has a hypermobility syndrome? What is Ehlers Danlos? Are isometrics a worthy starting place? What about unstable surface training? What is fear-avoidance? How do I go about using education to reduce fear avoidance? What other tactics do I use to mitigate fear avoidance?

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Exercise Dosing, Crossfit Shoulder Injuries, Regional Interdependence Education – Movement Debrief Episode 57

Movement Debrief Episode 57 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: What factors do I look for to determine I selected the right exercise amount that leads to changes in testing stick? How much of a stimulus do we need before a client sees adaptation? Why do crossfitters always hurt their shoulder? What things can crossfitters work on to reduce injury risk? How do I get buy-in when I am working on an area or a quality that is not directly related to what the client wants to improve? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram.They air every Wednesday at 7pm CST. Enjoy! and the audio version…                  Here were the links I mentioned: Sign-up for the Human Matrix in Seattle, WA on September 15-16th here Sign up for the Human Matrix in Kansas City, KS on October 27-28th here   Sign-up for the Human Matrix in Portland, OR on November 10-11 here Tim Gabbett Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 3 hours and 50 pages of content, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies: Bill Hartman Here is a move I am using to get scapular upward rotation Here is a move I use to get subscapularis

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How to Communicate with People in Pain

Communicating with people in pain is a tricky situation. If you say the wrong thing, or act afraid amidst pain, negative consequences will ensue with your client. So what is a clinician or coach to do when talking with a client? Are there better word choices to make when communicating with someone in pain? If you have these questions, then check out this week’s podcast and post. I provide some suggestions to help communicate with your people in pain, which will help them reach their goals.

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Neck Strength, Narrow Infrasternal Angles, and My Joint Went Out! – Movement Debrief Episode 46

Movement Debrief Episode 46 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: How can we best train the neck for grappling or head impact sports? What are the mechanics behind the narrow infrasternal angle? What is the treatment strategy for a narrow infrasternal angle? Do joints go “out?” If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram.They air every Wednesday at 7pm CST. Enjoy! and the audio version…                      Here were the links I mentioned: Sign-up for the Human Matrix September 15-16th here Here is a video of the neck bridge (courtesy of Expert Village) Action of the Diaphragm on the Ribcage Respiration Revisited Here are some exercise I give to people with a narrow infrasternal angle. My top is the diamond lazy bear: The toe touch to the squat the dorsal rostral squat and the sidelying pec twist Systematic review and meta-analyses of the difference between the spinal level of the palpated and imaged iliac crests Content validity of manual spinal palpatory exams – A systematic review Reliability of Physical Examination for Diagnosis of Myofascial Trigger Points The Mechanisms of Manual Therapy in the Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain: A Comprehensive Model Neurophysiological effects of spinal manipulation Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 3 hours and 50 pages of content, a free acute:chronic workload

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D League Readiness Measures, Navigating Flare-ups, and Should I get the OCS? – Movement Debrief Episode 16

Just in case you missed last night’s Movement Debrief Episode 16, here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure. Here’s what we talked about: What readiness and performance measures I used in the NBA D League What I would’ve done differently? How to navigate a pain flare-up What are the pro’s and con’s of becoming a clinical specialist If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST. Enjoy.   Here were some of the links I mentioned in this Debrief. How to Design a Comprehensive Rehab Program How to Treat Pain with Sitting – A Case Study Services sign-up Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies: D League Readiness Measures Navigating Flare-ups Should I get the OCS?  

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How to Design a Comprehensive Rehab Program

Just when I thought I was out, the clinic pulls me back in. Though I’m glad to be back. There’s just a different vibe, different pace, and ever-constant variety of challenges that being in the clinic simply provides. This has been especially true working in a rural area. You see a much wider variety, which challenges you to broaden your skillset. I’m amazed at how much working in the NBA has changed the way I approach the clinic. Previously, I was all about getting people in and out of the door as quickly as possible; and with very few visits. I would cut them down to once a week or every other week damn-near immediately, and try to hit that three to five visit sweet spot. This strategy no doubt worked, and people got better, but I had noticed I’d get repeat customers. Maybe it wasn’t the area that was initially hurting them, but they still were having trouble creep up. Or maybe it was the same pain, just taking much more activity to elicit the sensation. It became clear that I was skipping steps to try and get my visit number low, when in reality I was doing a disservice to my patients. This was the equivalent of fast food PT—give them the protein, carbohydrates, and fats, forget about the vitamins and minerals. Was getting someone out the door in 3 visits for me or for them? The younger, big ass ego me, wanted to known as the guy

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Continuing Education: The Complete Guide to Mastery

75 That’s my number. No, not that number.   75 is the number of continuing education classes, conferences, home studies, etc that I’ve completed since physical therapy school. Though the courses are many, it was probably too much in a short period of time. When quantity is pursued, quality suffers. Sadly, I didn’t figure out how to get the most out of each class until the latter end of my career. Two classes in particular stand out: Mobilisation of the Nervous System by the NOI Group, and ART lower extremity. Yes, the content was great, but these classes stood out for a different reason. You see, instead of just doing a little bit of prep work, I kicked it up a notch. I extensively reviewed supportive material, took impeccable notes, and hit all the other essentials needed to effectively learn. I was prepared, and because I was prepared I got so much more out of these classes than my typical fair.  The lessons learned in those courses stick with me to this day. For the stuff you really want to learn, I’ll encourage you to do the same. Here is the way to get the most out of your continuing education. By the time you are done reading this post, you’ll understand why I now recommend a more focused learning approach and fewer courses. Let’s see how to do it.  

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