Backside Mechanics, Psych Referral, and Hernias – Movement Debrief Episode 97

Movement Debrief Episode 97 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: What is the difference between backside and frontside mechanics in sprinting? Would backside mechanics help someone push off the ground better, thus making them faster? What tips do I recommend for coaching sprinting? How do I go about approaching someone who needs a psychology referral? When is the best time to bring up that a client would benefit from a psychology referral? What are hernias? What are some different types of hernias? What treatments are typically performed for a hernia? What conservative treatments are useful for hernias? How do I approach treating a hernia?

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Super Flat T-Spines, Strokes, and Running Form – Movement Debrief Episode 91

Movement Debrief Episode 91 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: First, an addendum on the big toe.  What needs to happen for posterior thorax expansion? What activities and techniques should one use for someone who really struggles getting air in the posterior thorax? How does my model apply to someone with a stroke? Any particular activities useful for someone with a stroke? Are there any particular cues or recommendation I have for running form?

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Acceleration

I utilize a notecard system to help me organize similar material I come across from various resources. My intent over the next few years is to share and continually update these notecards with you. This notecard is all about building the essential quality of acceleration. Acceleration Mechanics Effective acceleration relies positioning the body to maximize force application into the ground. “The ground is the well from which you draw speed” ~Dan Pfaff There are three keys to acceleration: Rhythm – pace and steps should follow a crescendo (like a slow clap). Rise – There should be an incremental rise in center of mass (like an airplane taking off) Projection – the system continues to go forward1 Trunk Mechanics The most important key to accelerating well is a fast and large first step2. It is this first step, and the distance gained from the first step, that initiates the desirable acceleration crescendo. Keeping the body and shin angle at 45 degrees allows horizontal and vertical forces to merge in a manner that is necessary for acceleration2,3. If short, choppy steps are performed during this phase, then less force is applied into the ground. Lower Extremity Mechanics The leg and toe should stay low to generate push-off in the first few steps, though this is not something we wish to cue4. Some sprint coaches will cue dragging the toe to reinforce position, but this strategy is undesirable. Toe drag increases friction and slows the athlete down2. Equally problematic is staying too low. If

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September in Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets. Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on from this past August. If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend. Biggest Lesson of the Month Much of our successes and failures can be linked back to the habits we have. I noticed many times this past month that ineffective habits I had picked up were hampering my progress and productivity. One simple change (eliminating a to-do list, blocking out time to do things) was a complete game changer for me. If you are doing something you don’t like, how do your habits keep you falling into that trap? Quote of the Month “Quality is not an act. It is a habit.” ~ Aristotle Very much linked to the above lesson. We need quality to become automatic, and who better to illustrate this than an O.G. like Aristotle. Hike of the Month This was a tough decision to make on multiple fronts. This month I hiked four National Parks, saw a National Monument, and did all types of ill stuff. Though Sequoia National Park will forever hold a dear place in my heart, Yosemite was hands down one of the most impressive things I’ve ever seen. The variety of terrain,

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The Derek Hansen Speed Seminar

It turns out the Hamptons isn’t just a place to live large. It’s also a place where great learning can take place. That is exactly what recently happened when me and my boizzz arranged a 1-day seminar with sprint coach extraordinaire, Derek Hansen. For those who don’t know, Derek is one of the best sprint coaches in Canada, and had spent 10 years learning from THE Charlie Francis. He is a wealth of knowledge in many areas, but the course focus was on all things sprinting, speed, acceleration, and periodization. The setup we arranged was very unique. We watched Derek coach three different athletes on sprint mechanics, and watching the man work was quite remarkable. His ability to find the right cue, verbiage, and drill to attain improved sprint mechanics was remarkable. He is definitely an artist at his craft. Point being, if you get a chance to hear the man speak, do so. You won’t regret it. Without further ado, here are the notes. [Note – I am not the best sprinter in the world, so bear with me on the videos]

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