August 2019 Links and Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets. Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on in August. If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend.

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Is it Risky to Change Your Movement Patterns?

Many claim there are inherent risks when changing the way someone moves, especially with higher level athletes. But is this fear warranted? Do we as movement professionals have the power to alter athletes the way we think we do? I sift through this question in today’s podcast, where I discuss the supposed risks one undergoes when altering movement patterns. It may not be as risky as you think. Check out the podcast, show notes, and modified transcripts below. Show Notes Usain Bolt debrief I did dispelling this absurd myth Below is a good example of Usain Bolt’s asymmetry: Here is a deep dive into the 90/90 hip lift Below is the rockback breathing exercise Joel Jamieson is my go-to resource for conditioning Putting the Myth to Rest I want to discuss this myth that I see going on around the interwebs, which I thought I put to rest in a previous debrief, but unfortunately I still see it perpetuated. What is that myth? I’m glad you asked. The myth is when you see someone who is a good performer in whatever they do, and they are utilizing compensatory movement strategies. Do we change these strategies? If that supposedly is what makes them great? So today I’ve decided I want to go Ether on this. Put this to rest, because I do not want this myth perpetuated. Check Your Ego  For those who have never heard of this, basically some professional athlete will move with a compensatory strategy, such as Usain Bolt. If

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Respiration and Posture for Better Sprinting and Lifting

Want to help your clients and athletes perform at a higher level by incorporating breathwork? I recently did a q&a over at Simplifaster, where we discussed all things breathing, performance, and training. Below is a list of the questions I answered: The difference between the breathing patterns seen in strength training and in dynamic athletic performance. How breathing on the ground transfers to what happens when standing and moving around? The top priorities in training an athlete’s trunk and midsection How to deal with common “thoracic spine mobility” deficit in athletes How to use “big lifts” for athletes, squatting and deadlifting, in light of muscle activation and posture How to progress single leg exercise progression Click on the link below to check it out Respiration and Posture for Better Sprinting and Lifting

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7 Key Programming Variables

I want to introduce you guys to one of the smartest fam in fitness, Michelle Boland. She’s a creative strength coach who’s breadth of programming knowledge is second to none. I wanted to bring her in to the fam because she sent me this dope programming article, which goes over various keys to consider when creating an exercise program. Enjoy!

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Social Media Resources

I was asked recently about how I utilize social media.  Namely, who I follow, why I follow them, so on and so forth. Up front, I do the best I can to limit my time on these platforms exposure. As we all know, it is very easy to get sucked into a rabbit hole of walls, posts, cats of Instagram hashtags, etc. Before you know it, it’s been four hours and you missed the most recent episode of “Days of Our Lives.” Secondary to the inevitable timewarp that you can be pulled into on social media, I utilize each platform with various goals in mind. This helps me stratify my consumption, and provide me the most relevant information.

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Recommended Resources

I oftentimes get asked what resources I recommend. The resources listed below have been essential at putting me down the path that I am currently going, and have shaped how I practice today. The cool thing about this list? None of these are set in stone. If I find a better resource, or one of the blogs I recommend starts to resonate with me less, it leaves the list (no pressure). I want to give you guys the most up-to-date resources as humanly possible, so please check back here frequently. If you’d like articles and such that are tripping my trigger as of late, you may want to sign up for my newsletter. You’ll also get some access to almost 3 hours and 40+ pages worth of exclusive content on pain and breathing. Here are my resources: Foundational Sciences Video series Makemegenius – A youtube page dedicated to explaining scientific concepts that a kid could understand. Crashcourse – Another series of short videos explaining complex scientific topics and more in 15 minutes or less. I wish I had this in undergrad. Books Gilroy Atlas of Anatomy – Easily the best paper anatomy atlas you can find in the land. The angles drawn, the clarity of pictures, this atlas has it all. Wait until you see the subocciptals from the side. #mindblown Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology – Easily the best and most comprehensive physiology textbook in the land, the depth at which this book dives into with concepts

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Practical Basketball Conditioning

Hey party people. Just when you thought I was done guest posting, I got another spot on my guy Mike Robertson’s website. This post was a follow-up to the basketball conditioning mistakes post I did last week. If conditioning mistakes are the disease, this post is the cure. In this post, I discussed the following topics: What the energy system demands are in basketball The three conditioning qualities a basketball player must possess to be successful The high/low method and more You can check out the blog here, or at the big ol’ link below. If you want some of MR’s best energy systems posts, I’d check these bad boys out: You NEED Long Duration, Low Intensity Cardio 6 Tips for Writing Better Conditioning Programs 5 More Thoughts on Energy Systems Development Real Talk About Aerobic Training for Athletes Enjoy. Practical Basketball Conditioning

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Lat Stretch Arm Position, Exercise Programming, and Staying Neutral? – Movement Debrief Episode 10

Episode 10 of the Movement Debrief, we went straight up q&a from readers. It was a lot of fun and I got a lot of great question from people. Here was what we discussed: Should the arm be in internal or external rotation when stretching the lats? If general exercise works, why should we incorporate specific exercises? Why coaching exercises well is of utmost importance Is staying neutral in a good joint position important? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST. Enjoy. Lat Stretch Arm Position Exercise Programming Staying Neutral?

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Start at the End: A Case for Special Physical Preparedness

“I need to get my wind back.” Every time I heard this I cringed. I did all the right stuff returning guys back to sport. I’m talking getting guys more neutral than Ron Hruska on a tropical island, FMS scores that Gray Cook would be ‘mirin’, hop tests that Kevin Wilk would foam at the mouth over, and high intensity continuous training sessions that would make Joel Jamieson say “really?” Yet as soon as they got onto the court, they’d be smoked. I’d hear that cursed phrase over and over again. What was I doing wrong? I thought we address all of their performance needs, yet we would continually run into the same problem. It wasn’t until I learned the following axiom that we broke this pattern:

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Course Notes: PRI Interdisciplinary Integration 2015

A Stellar Symposium Back in April I had the pleasure of finally attending PRI’s annual symposium, and what an excellent learning experience. The theme this year was working with high-powered, extension-driven individuals. The amount of interdisciplinary overlap in each presentation made for a seamless symposium. Common themes included the brain, stress response, HRV, resilience, and drive. These are things altered in individuals who are highly successful, but may come at a cost to body systems. If you work with business owners, CEOs, high-level athletes and coaches, high level positions, straight-A students, special forces, and supermoms, this symposium was for you. And let’s face it; we are both in this category! There were so many pearls in each presentation that I wish I could write, but let’s view the course a-ha’s. The Wise Words of Ron Ron Hruska gave four excellent talks at this symposium regarding high performers and occlusion. Let’s dive into the master’s mind. People, PRI does not think extension is bad. Extension is a gift that drives us to excel. Individuals who have high self-efficacy must often “over-extend” themselves. This drive often requires system extension. Extension is a consequence, and probably a necessary adaptation, of success. If this drive must be reduced to increase function and/or alter symptoms in these individuals, we have to turn down the volume knob. How can we power down these individuals? Limit alternate choices – These folks take a wide view of a task Set boundaries – These folks attribute failure to external factors Making initial

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