Troubleshooting Table Tests

Learn what range of motion testing really tells you Movement Debrief Episode 123 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the setlist: Are standing postural assessments useful? What are the best assessments to use online? Does it differ if you are a trainer or clinician? How do I make decisions based off of table tests? What does it mean when someone has clear table tests but is limited in standing measures? What’s the difference between a Thomas test and an ober’s test? How does one determine if someone has ligamentous laxity or not?

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Iliotibial Band Syndrome, Shoewear, and Quick Assessments – Movement Debrief 75

Movement Debrief Episode 75 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: What is IT band syndrome? What factors must we consider for treatment of IT band syndrome? What keys do I look for in a good shoe? What in my assessment would lead me to selecting certain shoes? Does shoewear matter for different contexts such as walking or sport? When short on time, what 3 key assessment pieces do I use to make decisions? What assessments would you use in larger group sessions?

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Variability, The Problem of Transfer, and Gymnastics – Charlie Reid

 I recently had a great conversation with my dear friend, Charlie Reid. Charlie is a very successful trainer in the San Francisco Bay area, and a wealth of knowledge when it comes to a variety of fitness domains. He reached out to me to help audit his thought process, and it turned out we had an incredible conversation. Here were a few topics we discussed: Where does variability training fit when chasing fitness? What do certain variability tests theoretically look at, and what are the relevant mechanics? How well does variability training transfer to higher level activities? and many more  Click below to check out the video, and read along with the modified transcripts. I’ve linked some helpful pictures and links throughout. Enjoy. or if you’d rather, here is the audio version: Modified Transcript Charlie: I’m always looking for people to to audit my own thought process on things and help with shifting my paradigm. I’ve had these conversations with Joe Cicinelli regularly about interjecting PRI-based things with with fitness. It’s not even PRI, it’s just looking at like the body with this neuro-pulmonary/neuro-mechanical lens that I want to move towards and understand more of, but I’m also a pragmatist. I want to be as practical as I possibly can within the context that I’m working. That’s always a challenge. How do we take this information and make it as practical as possible? I’ll start with a confession first. I don’t I actually have a strong prejudice against PRI clinical exercises.

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Iliotibial Band Bullshit, Deciding What to Learn, Hip Internal Rotation, and Structure, function, and pathology – Movement Debrief Episode 23

Movement Debrief Episode 23 is in the books. Here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure. Here were all the topics (credit Jand80 for the awesome question): Thoughts on the Ober’s test and structures involved Can you stretch the IT band? How to build a thought process The hierarchy of restoring hip motion and where internal rotation fits Do PT’s address structure or function? Are we really testing and seeing pathology? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 7:30pm CST. Enjoy.                    Here were the links I mentioned tonight IFAST University An Anatomic Investigation of the Ober’s Test Three-Dimensional Mathematical Model for Deformation of Human Fascia  Enhancing Life Darkside Strength Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies:   Iliotibial Band Bullshit Deciding What to Learn Hip Internal Rotation Structure, Function, and Pathology

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