Kegels, Overhead Reaching, and Overuse vs Deconditioned – Movement Debrief Episode 104

Movement Debrief Episode 104 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: What are pelvic diaphragm mechanics during breathing? How do these mechanics relate to two different types of kegel (holding in urine vs gas) Is there a reason to encourage a kegel? What could be the negative implications of a kegel? What breathing mechanics does reaching overhead encourage? What type of reaching would each infrasternal angle presentation benefit from? What are some signs to differentiate an overuse injury vs tissue deconditioning? How do you encourage someone with an overuse injury to proceed? How do you encourage someone with tissue deconditioning to proceed?

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September 2019 Links and Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets. Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on in September. If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend.

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July 2019 Links and Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets. Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on in July. If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend.

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Top 10 Posts of 2018

At the end of each year, I like to see what you beautiful…sexy…outstanding people liked. What the fam….recognized (fam). This year, it seems like errbody was loving all of the movement-based work that was discussed. You want practical application as a coach or clinician, you got it! I also loved how all the guest posts I had this year made the top 10. There were some rock solid contributions from my fellow colleagues. Guess I’m going to need more album features if you know what I’m sizzlin’. I want to thank you, the fam, for making 2018 an outstanding year. It has been all the comments, questions, stories, and praise that keeps me outputting content for you. I think we will keep doing this another year. Why not? 😉 But enough rambling. Let’s check out the top 10. First off… 10. The Reckoning: Part Deux Course Review This was an excellent seminar that was run by two of my favorite doctors in the game: Pat Davidson and Ben House. The topics covered were a great variety of areas I needed more exposure in. If you want to learn how our movement limitations are evolutionary, the ins and outs of hypertrophy or fat loss, blood sugar regulation, you’ll just scratch the surface of what this course covered. If you ever get a chance to hear Pat or Ben in person, do so. In fact, you can hear Pat, myself, and Seth Oberst in February.  9. Why You Need Sun Exposure My man Iordan

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Physical Therapy Faux Pas: 5 Fixable Blunders Clinicians and Coaches Make

Faux Pas: (Noun) An embarrassing or tactless act or remark.¹   I’m not the greatest physical therapist. I make mistakes, some people don’t get better, some people get worse. Yet despite my flaws, I’ve done all that I can to minimize as many avoidable errors as possible. Errors that can put maladaptive beliefs into a client’s mind. Errors that can hinder progress. Sadly, I see many people make these avoidable errors. And I’m not talking therapists only. I’m talking coaches, doctors, chiropractors, everyone. While we can all agree that clinical errors are expected and unavoidable, many problems can be fixed simply by changing the way we think and communicate with clients. Better communication will lead to greater success for the client one, and better collaboration to those seeking to help said client. Here are some faux pas to avoid, and solutions to these problems.

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You’re Hurt, Now What?

Getting hurt. It happens. Many times when it does, your mind will end up racing. What should I do? Should I go see a doctor? Do I just wait it out? What can I do to help me get back on my feet faster? Without a guide, these questions may seem impossible to answer. Until now. Check out today’s podcast and post that creates for you a standard operating procedure anytime an injury is sustained.

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Refer In: When Trainers Can Work with People in Pain

It is a common recommendation to immediately refer clients in pain to a medical practitioner. However, immediate referral is oftentimes not warranted, and in certain cases is discouraged. But as a trainer, how do you know when a client’s pain is a medical problem, and when is it not? With today’s podcast, I hope to answer that question for you, as well as give you tips on working with people in pain, and collaborating in a manner that is in your client’s best interest. Enjoy, and check out the modified transcript below                  Modified Transcript If you are a trainer, and your client has pain, what should you do? Well I’m glad you asked. Many people on the interwebz will make the claim that if your client has pain, you should refer. The reason why this claim is made is 1) because you do not want to make your client problem worse; 2) you also want to cover your ass. If you do something and your client’s problem gets worse, you could potentially get sued. That’s why people say “when in pain, refer out.” I think that this claim is bullshit, and here’s why. Reasons why immediate referral can be problematic There are three negative consequences when you pull the referral trigger too early. Pain does not equal tissue damage This claim assumes that pain and tissue damage are synonymous. If you listen to my talk, Practical Pain Education, you would find that

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Why is There an Injury Epidemic in the NBA

Even though I am no longer in the league, I still follow what’s going on in the NBA to a degree. And this weekend was a weekend loaded with season-ending injuries. First, you have Demarcus Cousins go down with an achilles rupture, then you have Andre Roberson go down with a patellar tendon tear, and then my boi Mike Conley is out for the season with heel surgery. The NBA is a tough league. Since the Cousins injury occurred first, I wanted to give you my initial thoughts as to when it happened. Having witnessed an achilles tear occur this with a player I worked with, it’s something you never wish upon anyone. For those who don’t know, Demarcus is the stud center for the New Orleans Pelicans. He has a very cool style of play where he can battle in the post, drive with mad handles, hit the three ball, pass, and is a rebounding monster. He has also been having one of his best years yet. What he’s not known for is being this ripped physical specimen, a level headed player, or one who is in the best shape. When he came into the league, he was hovering at about 16.3% bodyfat, which for some odd reason is  a stat many teams obsess over1. Let’s now take a look at his injury mechanism.

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October Links and Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets. Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on from this past August. If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend. Biggest Lesson of the Month Life ought to focus on creating value, for the people you work with, for others, for the world, for yourself. When you create value, rewards will come. Quote of the Month “Common 99% thinking won’t get you uncommon 100% results” ~ MJ Demarco MJ Demarco is becoming one of my favorite authors, and he inspired the biggest lesson above. Hike of the Month I didn’t get much hiking in this past month, namely because I was prepping for my talks in the land of China. However, while in China, my hotel was right next to this really cool park that I walked through frequently. Amazing amalgamation of architecture, flora, and people. Training The Trick to a Perfect Rear Foot Elevated Split Squat My son, Trevor Rappa, gave us a great cue on nailing the rear foot elevated split squat. Perfect for those people who sag into the back leg. Weight Position During the Squat Want to more effectively load the legs when you are squatting? Here is one of the most impactful changes I’ve made

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Death of Vertical Tibia, Usain Bolt, Complex Patients, and More – Movement Debrief Episode 13

Movement Debrief Episode 13 yesterday involved quite a few rants. Must’ve been the ketones talking. Here’s what we talked about: Restoring sensation with my patient with low back pain Why it’s okay to have an angled tibia during squatting Would any intervention help/hurt Usain Bolt? The complexity of Usain Bolt Struggling with a complex patient Dealing with uncertainty Embracing the struggle If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. (occasionally) They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST. Enjoy. Here were some of the links I mentioned in this Debrief. How to Deadlift – A Movement Deep Dive Squatting Bar Reach – A Movement Deep Dive The Sensitive Nervous System – Read my book notes here Clinical Neurodynamics- Read my book notes here A Study of Neurodynamics: The Body’s Living Alarm Mobilisation of the Neuroimmune System – Read the course notes here Explain Pain– Read the course notes here Extreme Ownership The Obstacle is the Way Ego is the Enemy The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck Restoring Sensation Death of Vertical Tibia Usain Bolt Complex Patients

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Master the Fundamentals of PT, Neurodynamic Tricks, & Check Your Ego – Movement Debrief Episode 7

Episode 7 of the Movement Debrief (aka The Movement Awakens) occurred last night. I can only imagine how devastated you are that you missed it. But hey, though I think it’s way more fun live, I have a copy of the video below, where we discussed the following topics: Why fundamental PT skills are still relevant Why the basic clinical exam is incredibly important Determining if you can or cannot help your patients A simple trick to making any movement a neurodynamic test Doing what is best for the patient, not your ego or agenda If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST. Enjoy. Master the Fundamentals of PT Neurodynamic Tricks Check Your Ego

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The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains

A Humdinger No Doubt   Ankle sprains. Such a bugger to deal with.   Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries seen in basketball. The cutting, jumping, contact, fatigue, and poor footwear certainly don’t help matters. Damn near almost every game someone tweaks an ankle. Treating ankle sprains in-game provides quite a different perspective. Rarely in the clinic do we work with someone immediately post-injury. Instead, we deal with the cumulative effects of delayed treatment: acquired impairments, altered movement strategies, and reduced fitness. The pressure is lower and the pace is slower. You shed that mindset with the game on the line. You must do all in your power to get that player back on the court tonight, expediting the return process to the nth degree. I had a problem. Figuring out the most efficient way to treat an ankle sprain was needed to help our team succeed. I searched the literature, therapeutic outskirts, and tinkered in order to devise an effective protocol. The result? We had 12 ankle sprains this past season. After performing the protocol, eight were able to return and finish out the game. Out of the remaining four, three returned to full play in two days. The last guy? He was released two days after his last game. It’s a tough business. The best part was we had no re-sprains. An impressive feat considering the 80% recurrence rate¹.    Caveats aside, treating acute injuries with an aggressive mindset can be immensely effective. Here’s how.

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