Why I Am Expanding My Maxilla at 33 Years Old

When getting a tongue tie release isn’t enough Placing your tongue on the roof of your mouth is important for increasing upper airway space, promoting nasal breathing, and positively affecting neck dynamics. These were a few reasons why I pursued a tongue tie release surgery. Increasing my tongue range of motion would allow me to more easily attain this posture, and hopefully feel a litany of positive effects. But that’s assuming one critical piece… Is there enough room for your tongue to sit on the roof of the mouth? That, folks, was the issue I had, and why the surgery was not enough. Here were my next steps.

Read More

Geriatrics, Pain with Breathing, and Dentists – Movement Debrief Episode 99

Movement Debrief Episode 99 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: What are the key performance indicators many geriatrics need to keep healthy? What are some tips to maximizing movement options in geriatrics? What progressions do I utilize for geriatrics? What are some tips to get someone to complete a breath without pain? Any cues for having someone tuck who is overweight? How do we work around someone who is fear avoidant? Any tips for helping someone progress to going overhead without pain? What are the key things I look for in a dentist?

Read More

July 2018 Links and Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets. Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on in July. If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend.

Read More

Acute Pain, Dead Hangs, and Occlusion – Movement Debrief Episode 40

Movement Debrief Episode 40 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: How to approach someone with an acute spasm? Can anything be done to improve acute pain syndromes? What should the finishing position be in vertical pulls? Should we “reach” during vertical pulls? Is there a risk of impingement with hanging from a bar? Should we “pack” the shoulder during pullups? What is occlusion and what are the basic types? How does occlusion relate to posture and pain? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram.They air every Wednesday at 7:30pm CST. Enjoy!                  Here were the links I mentioned: Mike Roussell The efficacy of manual joint mobilisation/manipulation in treatment of lateral ankle sprains: a systematic review Ankle manual therapy for individuals with post-acute ankle sprains: description of a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial Meriva Curcumin (it’s more bioavailable than regular; shoot for 2-8g/day) A Randomized, Pilot Study to Assess the Efficacy and Safety of Curcumin in Patients with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis Curcumin: a new paradigm and therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of osteoarthritis: curcumin for osteoarthritis management Fish Oil Bill Hartman Here is an example of a bar hang exercise (the famous one courtesy of Bill Hartman…and yes, I did have hair):   Shoulder Pain? The Solution & Prevention, Revised & Expanded Here is a video of the

Read More

Course Notes: PRI Cervical Revolution

Where are all the People? I recently made the trek to Vermont for the first rendition of PRI’s Cervical Revolution course; a course in which the attendees doubled the population of the entire state. It was nice to go to the class with a bunch of old friends. You always learn better that way, and I couldn’t have been more excited to get the band back together. And even more so, I got to meet a lot of good folks for the first time. It was a real treat. This course was meant to update the former craniocervical mandibular restoration course (which I reviewed here and here), with extra emphasis on the cervical spine and OA joint. In this blog however, I will not touch much on the cervical spine positioning. I still have several questions regarding the mechanics. Some spots within the manual seemed to be conflicting; the blessing and curse of a first run-through. I will update this piece once I get these points figured out. That said, the revolution helped fine tune the dental integration process for me. I have been working a bit with a dentist, and I have a bit more insight in terms of what devices they are using for whom. Let’s go through my big a-ha moments. Smudging 901 The human body is symmetrically asymmetrical. When we have capacity to alternate and reciprocate, we are able to separate the body into parts to form a whole. If you lack integration, then there are

Read More

Course Notes: The Last Craniocervical Mandibular Restoration Evahhhhh

You’d Think I’d Learn it the First Time Around You’d think, but CCM is one of the hardest PRI courses to conceptualize.  It didn’t hurt that my work was hosting the Ron’s last time teaching this course, as next year we will see Cervical Revolution instead. I took this course last February, and it’s amazing how different the two courses were. We had a room filled with PRI vets, and the Ronimal went into so much more depth this time around. It was such a great course that I would love to share with you some of the clarified concepts. If you want a course overview, take a look here.  The TMCC  The right TMCC pattern consists of the following muscles with the following actions: Cranial retruders/mandibular protruders Right anterior temporalis Right Masseter Right medial pterygoid Sphenobasilar flexors Left rectus capitis posteror major Left obliquus capitis OA flexors that maintain appropriate cervical lordosis Right rectus capitis anterior Right longus capitis Right longus colli If this chain stays tonically active, then there is better accessory muscle respiratory capacity present. These muscles provide the fixed point needed for an apical breathing pattern. We want the muscles on the other side, the left TMCC, to be active. Their activity will allow alternating reciprocal cranial function to be possible. We also call this gait.  Keep Ya Sphenoid Flexed One cranial goal we have is to achieve sphenobasilar flexion, but what does this mean? In the RTMCC pattern, the sphenoid is in an extended position.

Read More

A Fly on the Wall of the Hruska Clinic

The Saga Continues  This post is way overdue, but a lot has been going on in life. I have just moved to Arizona to start anew, and the change is bittersweet. The Midwest is all that I have known for the past 27 years. I’m leaving a lot of loved ones behind that I will miss dearly. However, getting out of the Midwest to a warmer place has always been a dream for me, and I finally got that opportunity. I also get to work at an awesome clinic alongside like-minded clinicians. One of my good friends will even be there. Plus, summer forevaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhh!!!!!! So with this transition in my life marks a good time to reflect on one of my many experiences at the Hruska Clinic. This time, I will show you how the clinic itself operates. And their operation is a beautiful thing. The General Feel You walk in the door and can immediately shift into your left hip. That’s what this place is like upon entering. With various shades of purple and tan, you just feel at ease being there. It screams parasympathetic. This build was no accident of course. Purple is a calming color, giving those at the clinic a huge home-field advantage. I bet there is also a reason why you walk left to check-in at the front desk. The clinic is an interdisciplinary dream. The staff includes 5 physical therapists, an optometrist, a dentist, and a podiatrist. This setup allows for great communication among

Read More

Treatment at the Hruska Clinic: PRI Dentistry and Vision

For part 1, click here For part 3, click here Jaws will Drop  I’m in the dentist chair, The room slowly get darker and darker. I feel my mouth open, and I wasn’t sure what would happen next. Then Dr. Schnell places the necessary goup in my mouth to get an impression for my splint. I bite, and out comes the finish product. Before the impression was taken, Ron came in and explained what he was hoping to accomplish. He wanted to fit me for a gelb splint to give my tongue some space to move in my crowded mouth. This splint would also help bring my mandible forward. Dr. Schnell: “Is he neutral right now?” Ron: [throws a towel over my eyes and sets my neck in a lordosis] “Now he is.” And with that, the above sequence occurred and I was ready for vision. I couldn’t leave the room without that overarching reminder Ron gave me: Ron: “Margo, if this was your son, what would you do with those wisdom teeth?” Dr. Schnell: “I’d have them pulled.” Yikes! An Eye Opening Experience  It was so much fun watching Ron and Heidi teach together, that I could only imagine what it was like seeing them treat. They did not disappoint. My session was getting videotaped for their marketing department, so I again told them my story. It ought to end up on the Internet sometime, so stay tuned for that! They began the session by showing some of my

Read More

Treatment at the Hruska Clinic – Initial Evaluation

For part 2, click here. For part 3, click here. “Do you produce enough saliva?” That was the first interview question Ron Hruska asked me; something I will never forget. I went to Lincoln, NE for almost a week to take a course, get treated, and observe PRI in it’s purest form. I wanted to see Ron out of curiosity and because I cannot achieve neutrality on my own. I have done most every exercise that could be thought of and been “worked on” by my fellow comrades and a couple PRI instructors in courses; nothing could budge. I knew I needed some type of orthotic to get somewhere; the question was which one? Subjective Complaints I do not have any pain really. My only complaints are a tight neck and I can’t seem to deadlift without feeling most of the effort in my back. I don’t see this deadlifting problem as a form issue necessarily. Interning with Bill Hartman at IFAST cleaned that up, and for a long time I could feel glutes and hamstrings all day when I deadlift. But not now. Other “issues” I have Left TMJ clicks; nonpainful. Clench jaw at night. Eye strain after reading on a computer too long (duh). By PRI standards, I am a classic PEC. I have no pathology anywhere, but I am limited in almost every motion.  I knew this and so did Ron. Objective Exam  First Ron had me walk and was pointing out some things to my student-to-be Trevor,

Read More