Challenges of Home Exercise Execution, Do You Really Have Sagittal Plane? and PT in 25 Years

[iframe style=”border:none” src=”//html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/5716224/height/100/width/480/thumbnail/no/render-playlist/no/theme/custom/tdest_id/568557/custom-color/#87A93A” height=”100″ width=”480″ scrolling=”no” allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen] Here’s what we talked about: What makes getting patients to do their home exercises challenging. Strategies I implement to increase adherence. How I determine when sagittal plane control is adequate. What I think PT will be like 25 years from now. Check out this episode!

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The 6-Step Method to Reading the Shit Out of Books

What Were We Talking About Again? If there is one thing I’ve struggled with over the years, it’s long term retention. Though remembering course materials has had it’s challenges, the struggle is worse with books. Overconsumption was part of the problem. Trying to read faster, and across multiple unrelated books caused more detriment than use. Much as our attention spans can be overstimulated by abundant information on the internet, so to can we suffer this fate with reading. There are a lot of books after all. While narrowing my reading focus has helped quite a bit, improving my reading strategy was equally important. I remember one summer I made it my goal to learn how to shuffle cards. We played A LOT of cards on my family vacations, and I was tired of having to use the automatic shuffler or having someone else shuffle for me at the family card game. It was time to become a man, damnit! I shuffled anytime I had some free time during the day; which back when I was a kid led to multiple bouts of daily shuffling. By the end of the summer, I was unconscious with shuffling, and still am to this day. Frequent, quality repetitions at any task will likely lead to improvement. Learning material is no different, we must just foster an environment of multiple exposures to said material. Here’s my latest attempt at doing so.

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Course Notes: PRI Cervical Revolution REMIX

Note: I made some errors on the first rendition of this blog that were corrected after speaking with Eric Oetter. Courtesy to him, Lori Thomsen, and Ron Hruska for cleaning up some concepts. Four Months Later When the Lori Thomsen says to come to Cervical Revolution, you kinda have to listen. I was slightly hesitant to attend since I had taken this course back in January. I mean, it was only the 3rd course rendition. How much could have changed?   Holy schnikes! It is simply amazing what four months of polishing can do. It was as though I attended a completely different course. Did I get it all figured out? No. But the clarity gained this weekend left me feeling a lot better about this very complex material. This is a course that will only continue to get better with time; if you have a chance to attend please do. Let’s now have a moment of clarity.   Biomechanics 101 The craniocervical region is the most mobile section of the vertebral column. This mobility allows regional sensorimotor receptors to provide the brain accurate information on occipital position and movement. The neck moves with particular biomechanics. Fryette’s laws suggest that the cervical spine produces ipsilateral spinal coupling in rotation and sidebending. The OA joint, on the other hand, couples contralaterally. C2 is the regulator of cervical spine motion; much like the first rib regulates rib cage movement. C2 is also important for the mandible, as it balances the cervical spine during

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Course Notes: BSMPG 2015

#Bestconferenceevaahhhhh I shipped off to Boston to attend my first ever BSMPG summer symposium. And it was easily one of the best conferences I’ve ever been to. There was an excellent speaker lineup and so much of my family. Art Horne really put on a fantastic show. If you haven’t been to BSMPG before, put it on your to-course list. It is one of the few courses that has a perfect combination of learning and socializing. I hope to not miss another. Instead of my usual this person talked about that, let’s look at some of the big pearls from the weekend.   Why Sapolsky Doesn’t Get Ulcers In one quote Robert Sapolsky summed up my current foundational premise to rehabilitation and training: “The stress response returns the body to homeostasis after actual or potential threats.” ~ Robert Sapolsky   Regardless of what your malady is, it can probably be linked back to the stress response gone awry. The specifics become irrelevant because the stress response occurs nonspecifically. This response works best against acute crises. Guess how we screw it up? Chronic stressors. Human stressors are quite different from other species’ as we have the capability of inducing this stress response psychosocially. Gazelles on the Serengeti don’t have to worry about student loans.   We can see how chronic stress becomes an issue when you look at what occurs in the stress response: Glucose travels to the bloodstream to mobilize energy. Increased cardiovascular tone, heart rate, and blood pressure. Decrease long-term building projects such as

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Course Notes: PRI Interdisciplinary Integration 2015

A Stellar Symposium Back in April I had the pleasure of finally attending PRI’s annual symposium, and what an excellent learning experience. The theme this year was working with high-powered, extension-driven individuals. The amount of interdisciplinary overlap in each presentation made for a seamless symposium. Common themes included the brain, stress response, HRV, resilience, and drive. These are things altered in individuals who are highly successful, but may come at a cost to body systems. If you work with business owners, CEOs, high-level athletes and coaches, high level positions, straight-A students, special forces, and supermoms, this symposium was for you. And let’s face it; we are both in this category! There were so many pearls in each presentation that I wish I could write, but let’s view the course a-ha’s. The Wise Words of Ron Ron Hruska gave four excellent talks at this symposium regarding high performers and occlusion. Let’s dive into the master’s mind. People, PRI does not think extension is bad. Extension is a gift that drives us to excel. Individuals who have high self-efficacy must often “over-extend” themselves. This drive often requires system extension. Extension is a consequence, and probably a necessary adaptation, of success. If this drive must be reduced to increase function and/or alter symptoms in these individuals, we have to turn down the volume knob. How can we power down these individuals? Limit alternate choices – These folks take a wide view of a task Set boundaries – These folks attribute failure to external factors Making initial

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