Hamstrings, Mental Resiliency, and Ankle Dorsiflexion – Movement Debrief Episode 47

Movement Debrief Episode 47 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: Do the hamstrings play a role with respiration? How does one train hamstrings? Can respiratory training improve mental resiliency and decision-making? How else can one improve decision-making in high stress environments? How do I approach improving ankle dorsiflexion? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram.They air every Wednesday at 7pm CST. Enjoy! and the audio version…                  Here were the links I mentioned: Sign-up for the Human Matrix September 15-16th here   Here is a link to the Complete Anatomy app Derek Hansen seminar course notes Derek Hansen Extreme Ownership The toe touch to the squat for narrow infrasternal angles The sink squat for wide infrasternal angles The counterweight squat as a terminal progression The Squatting Bar Reach: A Movement Deep Dive The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 3 hours and 50 pages of content, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies: Hamstrings Mental Resiliency Ankle Dorsiflexion

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Course Notes: Cantrell’s Impingement and Instability, 2015 Edition

Third Time’s a Charm  A trip home and hearing Mike Cantrell preach the good PRI word? I was sold. Impingement and Instability is one of those courses that I could take yearly and still get so many gems. In fact, I probably will end up taking it yearly—it’s that good. I took I&I last year with Cantrell (and the year before that with James), and the IFAST rendition was a completely different course. Cantrell provided the most PRI clinical applications I have seen at any course, which is why he continues to be one of my favorite people to learn from. Basically, if you haven’t learned from Mike yet, I pity you. Get to it! I have way too many gems in my notes to discuss, so here are a few big takeaways.

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Course Notes: PRI Cervical Revolution REMIX

Note: I made some errors on the first rendition of this blog that were corrected after speaking with Eric Oetter. Courtesy to him, Lori Thomsen, and Ron Hruska for cleaning up some concepts. Four Months Later When the Lori Thomsen says to come to Cervical Revolution, you kinda have to listen. I was slightly hesitant to attend since I had taken this course back in January. I mean, it was only the 3rd course rendition. How much could have changed?   Holy schnikes! It is simply amazing what four months of polishing can do. It was as though I attended a completely different course. Did I get it all figured out? No. But the clarity gained this weekend left me feeling a lot better about this very complex material. This is a course that will only continue to get better with time; if you have a chance to attend please do. Let’s now have a moment of clarity.   Biomechanics 101 The craniocervical region is the most mobile section of the vertebral column. This mobility allows regional sensorimotor receptors to provide the brain accurate information on occipital position and movement. The neck moves with particular biomechanics. Fryette’s laws suggest that the cervical spine produces ipsilateral spinal coupling in rotation and sidebending. The OA joint, on the other hand, couples contralaterally. C2 is the regulator of cervical spine motion; much like the first rib regulates rib cage movement. C2 is also important for the mandible, as it balances the cervical spine during

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Course Notes: PRI Interdisciplinary Integration 2015

A Stellar Symposium Back in April I had the pleasure of finally attending PRI’s annual symposium, and what an excellent learning experience. The theme this year was working with high-powered, extension-driven individuals. The amount of interdisciplinary overlap in each presentation made for a seamless symposium. Common themes included the brain, stress response, HRV, resilience, and drive. These are things altered in individuals who are highly successful, but may come at a cost to body systems. If you work with business owners, CEOs, high-level athletes and coaches, high level positions, straight-A students, special forces, and supermoms, this symposium was for you. And let’s face it; we are both in this category! There were so many pearls in each presentation that I wish I could write, but let’s view the course a-ha’s. The Wise Words of Ron Ron Hruska gave four excellent talks at this symposium regarding high performers and occlusion. Let’s dive into the master’s mind. People, PRI does not think extension is bad. Extension is a gift that drives us to excel. Individuals who have high self-efficacy must often “over-extend” themselves. This drive often requires system extension. Extension is a consequence, and probably a necessary adaptation, of success. If this drive must be reduced to increase function and/or alter symptoms in these individuals, we have to turn down the volume knob. How can we power down these individuals? Limit alternate choices – These folks take a wide view of a task Set boundaries – These folks attribute failure to external factors Making initial

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The Road to an Alternating and Reciprocal Warrior: You down with ENT?

This spans an entire treatment over a year’s time. Here’s part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4   “Yeah you know me.” ~ Naughty By Nature  You know how sometimes when you are treating someone that individual eventually reveals fairly important information that he or she forgot about. Yeah that was totally me. I’ve always had a stuffy nose as far back as I can remember; especially in the winter. The only time breathing felt incredibly easy was when I was eating paleo in college. I have progressively been losing my sense of smell as well. Must be old age right? When I spoke with Lori Thomsen about my recent experience, she mentioned at Pelvis that attaining neutrality in certain areas but not others could lead to a “pressure cooker” phenomenon. For example, if I have someone with a neutral neck and thorax, lower extremity symptoms may possibly be more common. In my case, I had a neutral pelvis at the time my wisdom teeth were pulled. Pull out wisdom teeth and my nasal airway goes crazy. Guess where the pressure went? It was time to see an ENT. ENT Begins After viewing my CT scan and airway, my ENT concluded I have patho-scoliosis. More specifically, airway scoliosis. He found a deviated septum and some enlarged turbinates. These two factors could have a large impact on my breathing capabilities. To me this made a lot of sense. If you read this article, a nostril will drive air to the ipsilateral lung.

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