Treatment at the Hruska Clinic: PRI Dentistry and Vision

For part 1, click here For part 3, click here Jaws will Drop  I’m in the dentist chair, The room slowly get darker and darker. I feel my mouth open, and I wasn’t sure what would happen next. Then Dr. Schnell places the necessary goup in my mouth to get an impression for my splint. I bite, and out comes the finish product. Before the impression was taken, Ron came in and explained what he was hoping to accomplish. He wanted to fit me for a gelb splint to give my tongue some space to move in my crowded mouth. This splint would also help bring my mandible forward. Dr. Schnell: “Is he neutral right now?” Ron: [throws a towel over my eyes and sets my neck in a lordosis] “Now he is.” And with that, the above sequence occurred and I was ready for vision. I couldn’t leave the room without that overarching reminder Ron gave me: Ron: “Margo, if this was your son, what would you do with those wisdom teeth?” Dr. Schnell: “I’d have them pulled.” Yikes! An Eye Opening Experience  It was so much fun watching Ron and Heidi teach together, that I could only imagine what it was like seeing them treat. They did not disappoint. My session was getting videotaped for their marketing department, so I again told them my story. It ought to end up on the Internet sometime, so stay tuned for that! They began the session by showing some of my

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Treatment at the Hruska Clinic – Initial Evaluation

For part 2, click here. For part 3, click here. “Do you produce enough saliva?” That was the first interview question Ron Hruska asked me; something I will never forget. I went to Lincoln, NE for almost a week to take a course, get treated, and observe PRI in it’s purest form. I wanted to see Ron out of curiosity and because I cannot achieve neutrality on my own. I have done most every exercise that could be thought of and been “worked on” by my fellow comrades and a couple PRI instructors in courses; nothing could budge. I knew I needed some type of orthotic to get somewhere; the question was which one? Subjective Complaints I do not have any pain really. My only complaints are a tight neck and I can’t seem to deadlift without feeling most of the effort in my back. I don’t see this deadlifting problem as a form issue necessarily. Interning with Bill Hartman at IFAST cleaned that up, and for a long time I could feel glutes and hamstrings all day when I deadlift. But not now. Other “issues” I have Left TMJ clicks; nonpainful. Clench jaw at night. Eye strain after reading on a computer too long (duh). By PRI standards, I am a classic PEC. I have no pathology anywhere, but I am limited in almost every motion.  I knew this and so did Ron. Objective Exam  First Ron had me walk and was pointing out some things to my student-to-be Trevor,

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Course Notes: PRI Vision Postural Visual Integration

Explosive I am still picking up the white matter that exploded all over the pavement as I left the PRI Vision course that was hosted in Grayslake, IL. It was an excellent experience interacting with Ron and Heidi, and believe it or not they are familiar with my blog…and the corresponding pictures. Therefore I was the butt of many jokes this past weekend, which definitely made me feel at home with the PRI family that I have so grown fond of. There is a reason it has taken me so long to put this work up. These notes have been the most challenging I have written yet, as the material was way out of what I have normally been studying. It is this class however, that solidifies PRI methodology as grounded in neurology. It was two days of brain, autonomics, vision, and optometry. I will do my best to show you what I learned in a semi-understandable manner. Seeing Visions Definition – “The deriving of meaning and the directing of action as a product of the processing of information triggered by a selected band of radiant energy.” – Robert Kraskin Vision is not just what we see, it is what drives us to make decisions.  It is a skill that we develop as we age. It is the dominant sense in the brain, as 70% of the brains connections are related to vision. Vision can and does become lateralized. Sight is the clarity of our visual field, which is slightly

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Course Notes: Postural Respiration

Another Course in the Books As an official Ron Hruska groupie, the tour continued to the Big Apple to learn a little Postural Respiration. And in NYC, everything is bigger. The biggest city I had prior been exposed to was Chicago. The cities feel similar, only NYC has twice as many people on the same size streets. I felt like this course was one of my less understood areas in the system, as Respiration was my first live PRI course. Taking this class the second time around really cleaned up a lot of things for me, and Ron was on point as always. So let’s dive into the cranium…I mean pelvis….I mean thorax. Oh sorry, wrong course. Laying the Foundation  The three foundational courses aim to inhibit tone, twist, torque, and tension in the human system by various methods. In Myokinematic Restoration, mastering the frontal plane with both legs inhibits the system. In Pelvis Restoration, active leg adduction inhibits the system. In Postural Respiration, trunk rotation inhibits the system. When these powers combine, the goal is to simultaneously maximize phases of gait and respiration. This development allows for total-body freedom to move, breathe, live, and create amidst our incessant desire to run on our built-in right stance autopilot. There is nothing wrong with right stance, but it becomes wrong when it is all you know. “There is nothing wrong with half the gait cycle until it becomes the full gait cycle.” ~Ron Hruska. Make a Memory – The Zone of

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PRI and Pain Science: Yes You Can Do It

Questions You may have noticed that my blogging frequency has been a little slower than the usual, and I would like to apologize for that. I am in the midst of creating my first course that I am presenting to my coworkers. It has been a very exciting yet time-consuming process. It makes me excited and more motivated to someday start teaching more on the reg. Ever since I started blogging people started asking me questions. These range from many topics regarding physical therapy, career advice, and the like. Some of the more frequent ones include: What courses should I look at? Any advice for a new grad? Seriously, Bane. What’s the deal? But the one I get asked more often then not is as follows: “Zac, how do you integrate PRI into a pain science model?” A great question indeed, especially to those who are relatively unfamiliar with PRI. With all the HG, GH, AF, FA, and FU’s, it’s easy to get lost in the anatomical explanations. Hell, the company even has the word (gasp) “posture” in the title. Surely they cannot think that posture and pain are correlated. I think there is a lot of misinformation regarding PRI’s methodology and framework. What needs to be understood is that PRI is a systematic, biopsychosocial approach that predominately (though not exclusively) deals with the autonomic nervous system. The ANS is very much linked into pain states, though not a causative factor. But of course, that may not be enough. Perhaps

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Course Notes: Therapeutic Neuroscience Education

How’s Your Pain How’s Your Pain How’s Your Pain How’s Your Pain? To purge onward with developing some semblance of chronic pain mastery (ha), my employer had the pleasure of hosting a mentor and good friend Adriaan Louw. I first heard Adriaan speak in 2010 when I was in PT school. I was amazed at his speaking prowess and the subject matter. Unfortunately, my class could only stay for a little while in his course, and onward life went. I went on with my career focusing on structure and biomechanics and forgetting about pain. It wasn’t until I ran into Adriaan again two years later. He was teaching me Explain Pain (EP), and forever changed how I approached patient care. It’s funny how things have come full circle.  Here we are, Adriaan teaching Therapeutic Neuroscience Education (TNE) through The International Spine and Pain Institute (ISPI), and me promoting his work to my colleagues. A lot has changed in two years. EP and TNE are quite different courses, and I learned so much this weekend that I continue to become more engrossed with what I do. So thank you, Adriaan, for playing a huge role shaping me into who I am today.  I have now become very much more interested in what ISPI has to offer, and I think you should too. And no worries Adriaan, I will stay hungry 🙂 So without further ado, here is what I learned. The Power of Words  It’s getting worse. One person out of

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Course Notes: Explain Pain

A Whirlwind I finally had the opportunity to meet my personal Jesus, David Butler, and learn the way that he explains the pain experience to patients. It was an interesting weekend to say the least. The course started off with a smash…literally. We had the unfortunate experience of someone breaking into our car to start the trip off. Then once we arrived to the course, we were informed that Dave was going to be 2 hours late. He was staying in Philly (where I also experienced flight troubles last week) and a snowstorm with a name no one cares about stopped his flight. So Dave drives all the way from Philadelphia, “tilting his head back to rest” for 1 hour, and then what happens? He, along with the other instructors, drive to the wrong campus. So after all these crazy things happen, Dave finally makes it to the course, sets up his presentation, plays a little Bob Marley, and……………… Kills it. I mean, absolutely kills it. To see Dave present this topic under the above circumstances and be on the entire time is a testament to the type of speaker and professional he is. David Butler is one of, if not the best speaker I have ever heard. So I’d like to thank you, Dave, for making an otherwise stressful weekend memorable and exciting. I look forward to applying what I have learned. If you haven’t taken a course from the NOI Group, please do so yesterday! So what did

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Course Notes: PRI Craniocervical Mandibular Restoration

“The Head and Neck Runs The Show.” ~Ron Hruska Hello, my name is Zac Cupples, and I have an addiction. I am addicted to attaining CEUs. But not just any CEUs, I want me some of that purple haze from the Postural Restoration Institute. I got my fix and then some. This past weekend I was at Endeavor Sports Performance in Pitman, NJ. I got to spend time learning about the neck and the cranium from none other then PRI founder, Ron Hruska. From the get-go, Ron was adamant in saying that this class was his baby. That this information is what started it all. And what I learned did not disappoint. When I took Advanced Integration this past winter, I understood that we were affecting a system, but it didn’t really settle in with me until now. What we are predominately using to affect the nervous system is not specific muscles, but namely triplanar muscle families. I am not trying to turn on the hamstrings, but I am trying remap the brain’s sagittal plane. I am not trying to turn on the IC adductor, but remapping frontal plane adduction to send me into left stance. Similarly, we can affect these movement planes with cervicocranial mandibular muscles. It is just another location in the system to which sensory input is applied. Though seeing what outputs resulted will leave you just as surprised as your patients and cleints. Watching Ron affect a person’s mobility throughout the entire body by manipulating a

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Course Notes: PRI Pelvis Restoration

Just recently attended another excellent PRI course taught by Lori Thomsen and new instructor Jesse Ham called Pelvis Restoration. The weekend was filled with great discussion about inlets, outlets, shoes, and many other pearls that helped solidify my PRI understanding. So without further ado, let’s summarize. If this is your first reading on a PRI course, it may be beneficial to review my post on Myokinematic Restoration. PRI 101 Jesse started off the class discussing some PRI basic philosophical tenets. In PRI, we talk a great deal about position, which will be defined as a stance or posture at one point in time. Or as Jesse defined it, a position one can maintain for an extended period of time without pain. With this operational definition, our goal as a PRI clinician or trainer is to organize activities in the following order: Reposition – inhibit muscle chains. Retrain – Facilitate muscle chains Restore – Create reciprocal alternating activity (using all muscle chains when it is desired). Reciprocal activity is defined as going from one end-range to another (extension to flexion) and alternating activity is switching from one side of the body to another (right to left stance). When we alternate, the joint on one side of the body ought to do the exact opposite at the other side. With the above treatment hierarchy, we are working on allowing positional freedom within the person being treated. We call this movement in multiple planes. Now the Pelvis This part is where things can

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The Year of the Nervous System: 2014 Preview

It’s All Part of the Plan And if you see my course schedule this year, the plan is indeed horrifying. I wanted to write a post today to somewhat compose my thoughts and plans for this year, as well as what I am hoping to achieve from the below listed courses. Because of the course load and some of my goals for the year, I am not sure what my blogging frequency will look like. I have begun to pick up some extra work so I am able to attend as much con ed as I do. The Amazon affiliate links that I don’t get money for because I live in Illinois simply cannot pay for classes :). I am just putting these links up here because I want to encourage you to read these books on your own. Use my site as a guide through them. Big Goals My biggest goal for this year is to successfully become Postural Restoration Certified (PRC), and my course schedule below supports this goal. The amount that I use this material and the successes that have come along with it simply compel me to become a PRI Jedi. I see the PRC as a means to achieving this goal. The application thus far has been quite time-consuming. There are a total of 3 case studies, 5 journal article reviews, and tons of other writing that has to be done. Couple that with studying the material, and I have had a very busy year.

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Course Notes: Advanced Integration Day 4 – Curvature of the Spine

Today we get wild and crazy and talk about scoliosis and the like; the last day of AI. For day 1, click here For day 2, click here For day 3, click here Scoliosis Variations The entire day focused predominately on treating scoliosis, which oftentimes amounts to exaggerations of the common patterns PRI discusses. Because scoliosis is an exaggerated PRI pattern, one must beget the question if the pattern or scoliosis came first? This question obviously cannot be answered, but for our intents and purposes we ought to assume pattern precedes curve. That way we may be able to alter the impairment. The scoliosis we can alter is often functional aka rotational. These types are ones that everyone has; the question is to what degree. Nonpathological Curve The nonpatho curve is an exaggerated version of the LAIC/RBC pattern, oftentimes with superior T4 syndrome involved. In this pattern the left ribs are externally rotated and right internally rotated. This reason is why 98% of scoliosis has right sided rib humps. A rib hump is akin to excessive rib internal rotation.  In this case, the spine looks like so… Here we can see how the spine excessively right orients up to T8-T9, then rotates left superior to that. These patients will present with typical Left AIC and Right BC test results along with typical right lateralization. One difference may be the right shoulder is not as low as typical with most patterned individuals. This change is due to compensating for the excessive curve. When

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The Post Wonderful Time of the Year: Top Posts of 2013

The Best…Around Time is fun when you are having flies. It seems like just yesterday that I started up this blog, and I am excited and humbled by the response I have gotten. Hearing praise from my audience keeps me hungry to learn and educate more. I am always curious to see which pages you enjoyed, and which were not so enjoyable; as it helps me tailor my writing a little bit more. And I’d have to say, I have a bunch of readers who like the nervous system 🙂 I am not sure what the next year will bring in terms of content, as I think the first year anyone starts a blog it is more about the writing process and finding your voice. Regardless of what is written, I hope to spread information that I think will benefit those of you who read my stuff. The more I can help you, the better off all our patients and clients will be. So without further ado, let’s review which posts were the top dogs for this year (and some of my favorite pics of course). 10.  Lessons from a Student: The Interaction This was probably one of my favorite posts to write this year, as I think this area is sooooooo under-discussed. Expect to be hearing more on patient interaction from me in the future. 9) Clinical Neurodynamics Chapter 1: General Neurodynamics Shacklock was an excellent technical read. In this post we lay out some nervous system basics, and

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