Iliotibial Band Bullshit, Deciding What to Learn, Hip Internal Rotation, and Structure, function, and pathology – Movement Debrief Episode 23

Movement Debrief Episode 23 is in the books. Here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure. Here were all the topics (credit Jand80 for the awesome question): Thoughts on the Ober’s test and structures involved Can you stretch the IT band? How to build a thought process The hierarchy of restoring hip motion and where internal rotation fits Do PT’s address structure or function? Are we really testing and seeing pathology? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 7:30pm CST. Enjoy.                    Here were the links I mentioned tonight IFAST University An Anatomic Investigation of the Ober’s Test Three-Dimensional Mathematical Model for Deformation of Human Fascia  Enhancing Life Darkside Strength Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies:   Iliotibial Band Bullshit Deciding What to Learn Hip Internal Rotation Structure, Function, and Pathology

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Chapter 4: Diagnosis of Specific Dysfunctions

This is a Chapter 4 summary of “Clinical Neurodynamics” by Michael Shacklock. Mechanical Interface Dysfunction In early stages of closing dysfunctions, symptoms present as aches and pains. This presentation is due to the musculoskeletal tissues being more affected than the neural tissue. As severity increases, neurological symptoms such as pins and needles, tingling, and burning are more likely to occur. The severest end of the spectrum includes numbness and weakness; indicating further compromise to the neurovascular structures. Interface dysfunctions behave with changes in posture and movement. Oftentimes cardinal signs of inflammation can be present, along with night pain/morning stiffness. Typically you will see a painful arc throughout movement. During the physical exam, patients will show an inability to move in opening or closing directions. You can also find altered pain production, soft tissue thickening, or hypermobility/instability. Neurological changes will usually be present only in severe interface dysfunction. There are four basic types of interface dysfunctions 1)      Reduced closing 2)      Excessive closing 3)      Reduced opening 4)      Excessive opening In reduced closing dysfunction, closing movements such as squeezing or cervical extension provoke symptoms. Assessment may show a protective deformity developing in the opening direction so pressure is reduced on the nervous system. Symptoms will often not be reproduced unless neurodynamic testing is combined with interface testing. Excessive closing is when, well, interfaces are closing too much. An example of this dysfunction is excessive lumbar lordosis present with low back pain that increases with standing, walking, and running. A patient’s history will often show

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Chapter 3: General Neuropathodynamics

This is a Chapter 3 summary of “Clinical Neurodynamics” by Michael Shacklock. What it is General neuropathodynamics are abnormalities consistent throughout the nervous system, with specific referring to local abnormalities. These changes may lead to a neurogenic pain experience, in which pain is initiated by a primary lesion, dysfunction, or transitory perturbation in the nervous system. This definition means that dysfunction in the nervous system, it’s surrounding tissues, and innervated tissues can all be related to neurogenic pain. Definitions of Clinical Problems When discussing dysfunction, there are several descriptors: 1)      Optimal/desirable: When the neuromusculoskeletal system behaves well and does not create symptoms in situations of high stress. 2)      Suboptimal: Imperfect neuromusculoskeletal behavior which results in potential symptom increasing if an adequate trigger occurs. 3)      Normal: Function of neuromusculoskeletal system is within normal values. 4)      Abnormal: Neuromusculoskeletal system is outside of the normal range. 5)      Relevant: When pathodynamics are linked to the clinical problem. 6)      Irrelevant: When pathodynamics are not linked to the clinical problem. You will oftentimes have multiple of these components in a clinical situation. Mechanical Interface Dysfunction These dysfunctions deal with abnormal or undesirable forces on the nervous system. There are two main categories with their own subcategories. 1)      Closing dysfunctions – Altered closing mechanisms of the movement complex. Can be reduced (protective response) or excessive (hypermobility/instability). 2)      Opening dysfunctions – Altered opening mechanisms of the movement complex. Can be reduced which creates impaired pressure reduction, or excessive leading to tissue traction. Pathoanatomical Dysfunction This type of dysfunction is

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