Hamstrings, Mental Resiliency, and Ankle Dorsiflexion – Movement Debrief Episode 47

Movement Debrief Episode 47 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: Do the hamstrings play a role with respiration? How does one train hamstrings? Can respiratory training improve mental resiliency and decision-making? How else can one improve decision-making in high stress environments? How do I approach improving ankle dorsiflexion? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram.They air every Wednesday at 7pm CST. Enjoy! and the audio version…                  Here were the links I mentioned: Sign-up for the Human Matrix September 15-16th here   Here is a link to the Complete Anatomy app Derek Hansen seminar course notes Derek Hansen Extreme Ownership The toe touch to the squat for narrow infrasternal angles The sink squat for wide infrasternal angles The counterweight squat as a terminal progression The Squatting Bar Reach: A Movement Deep Dive The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 3 hours and 50 pages of content, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies: Hamstrings Mental Resiliency Ankle Dorsiflexion

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The Post Wonderful Time of the Year: 2014 Edition

And That’s a Wrap It’s that time of the year that we get to look back and reflect and what posts killed it (and which bombed). It seems as though my fine fans be on a pain science kick this year, and rightfully so. It’s some of the best stuff on the PT market right now. It’s definitely a topic I hope to write about more in the coming year, and one I will be speaking on at this year’s PRC conference. But without further ado, here are the top 10 posts of 2014. 10. Treatment at the Hruska Clinic: PRI Dentistry and Vision Going through the treatment process as a patient has really upped my game in terms of knowing when to integrate with my patients. It has also been a life-changing experience for my health and well-being. Learn how they did it for me. 9. Course Notes: THE Jen Poulin’s Myokinematic Restoration So much fine tuning occured the second time around. I love how Jen acknowledged the primitive reflex origin of the patterns, as well as fine tuning both lift tests. She’s an excellent instructor (and fun to party with)! 8. Treatment at the Hruska Clinic: Initial Evaluation The start of my alternating and reciprocal saga. Made for one of the most fascinating evaluations I have ever experienced. Ron Hruska is otherworldly. 7. Course Notes: PRI Postural Respiration I love a good foundational course taught by the Ronimal. You always get a few easter eggs that allude to

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Post 100: Sexifying Upper Quadrant Post-Op

I Wrote a Lot It’s interesting to think how much this blog has changed since I started writing in February 2013. We’ve gone from cliff notes of books, to cliff notes of courses, to the occasional self-musing.   While I still plan on reviewing and assimilating courses I take, my hope is to expand and reflect upon whatever is in my brain a smidge more. It makes sense to start this trend with post 100. And today, postoperative care is piquing my interest. Yes, post-op intervention is a guilty pleasure of mine. And it’s not because it’s easy. Far from easy. Post op treatment gives you a license to create under various constraints. Meaning you have to dig a little deeper to achieve desired goals. I think it can be way sexier, and effective, than your typical post-op protocol BS. So let’s create some successful post-op fun. The First Constraint Before we even talk about specific patients, we have to first look at the largest constraint yet: available tools. At my current digs, I don’t have much of anything in terms of heavy weights. So here is what I have at my disposal that I can implement: 1-on-1 care for 60 minutes Kettlebells: 10, 15, 25 pounds Therabands and theratubes of various sizes Cook bands of various resistances PRI trial orthotics (mouth splints, arch supports, reading glasses, yada) Steps Tape IPAD 3D stretch cage (aka very expensive equipment to tie therabands to) Access to higher level brain centers Heart of

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PRI and Pain Science: Yes You Can Do It

Questions You may have noticed that my blogging frequency has been a little slower than the usual, and I would like to apologize for that. I am in the midst of creating my first course that I am presenting to my coworkers. It has been a very exciting yet time-consuming process. It makes me excited and more motivated to someday start teaching more on the reg. Ever since I started blogging people started asking me questions. These range from many topics regarding physical therapy, career advice, and the like. Some of the more frequent ones include: What courses should I look at? Any advice for a new grad? Seriously, Bane. What’s the deal? But the one I get asked more often then not is as follows: “Zac, how do you integrate PRI into a pain science model?” A great question indeed, especially to those who are relatively unfamiliar with PRI. With all the HG, GH, AF, FA, and FU’s, it’s easy to get lost in the anatomical explanations. Hell, the company even has the word (gasp) “posture” in the title. Surely they cannot think that posture and pain are correlated. I think there is a lot of misinformation regarding PRI’s methodology and framework. What needs to be understood is that PRI is a systematic, biopsychosocial approach that predominately (though not exclusively) deals with the autonomic nervous system. The ANS is very much linked into pain states, though not a causative factor. But of course, that may not be enough. Perhaps

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Course Notes: Therapeutic Neuroscience Education

How’s Your Pain How’s Your Pain How’s Your Pain How’s Your Pain? To purge onward with developing some semblance of chronic pain mastery (ha), my employer had the pleasure of hosting a mentor and good friend Adriaan Louw. I first heard Adriaan speak in 2010 when I was in PT school. I was amazed at his speaking prowess and the subject matter. Unfortunately, my class could only stay for a little while in his course, and onward life went. I went on with my career focusing on structure and biomechanics and forgetting about pain. It wasn’t until I ran into Adriaan again two years later. He was teaching me Explain Pain (EP), and forever changed how I approached patient care. It’s funny how things have come full circle.  Here we are, Adriaan teaching Therapeutic Neuroscience Education (TNE) through The International Spine and Pain Institute (ISPI), and me promoting his work to my colleagues. A lot has changed in two years. EP and TNE are quite different courses, and I learned so much this weekend that I continue to become more engrossed with what I do. So thank you, Adriaan, for playing a huge role shaping me into who I am today.  I have now become very much more interested in what ISPI has to offer, and I think you should too. And no worries Adriaan, I will stay hungry 🙂 So without further ado, here is what I learned. The Power of Words  It’s getting worse. One person out of

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