Shoulder Abduction, Chiropractic Adjustments, and Ending Passive Care – Movement Debrief Episode 66

Movement Debrief Episode 66 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: How does one go about improving shoulder abduction? What are my thoughts on adjustments or manipulations? Could adjustments potentially create laxity over time? When could these techniques prove useful? How do I get patients out of the “I need to be fixed” mindset? How do I encourage patients to buy in to an active approach to their recovery? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram. They air every Wednesday at 7pm CST. Enjoy! and the audio version…                  Here were the links I mentioned: Check out Human Matrix promo video below Below are some testimonials for the class Want to sign up? Click on the following locations below: Portland, OR on November 10-11  December 8th-9th, Charleston, SC (early bird ends November 11th) February 2nd-3rd, 2019, New Providence, NJ (early bird ends January 4th) SIGN UP FOR THE REVOLUTION featuring myself, Pat Davidson, and Seth Oberst February 9th-10th in Boston. MA If you want to learn about all the things thorax-wise that I talked about, go here Spinal Manipulation Institute If you’d like an older rendition on chiropractic adjustments, then check it out here. The Mechanisms of Manual Therapy in the Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain: A Comprehensive Model Unraveling the Mechanisms of Manual Therapy: Modeling an Approach.

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Packing the Shoulder, Chiropractic Adjustments, and Unstable Surface Training – Movement Debrief Episode 43

Movement Debrief Episode 43 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: Is there a place for packing the shoulder? Should we coach the shoulders to be down and back? How should we coach the shoulder to move? Do wide infrasternal angles cause more trap issues? Do chiropractic adjustments work? How to improve shoulder external rotation? What are my thoughts on unstable surface training? Is there any research supporting unstable surface training? What are the best ways to work on stability and balance? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram.They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST. Enjoy! and the audio version…                      Here were the links I mentioned: Infrasternal Angles The unreliability of posture Manipulation and mobilization for treating chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Spinal Manipulation Institute Restoring Shoulder Motion Here is an example activity I use to restore shoulder external rotation Effects of Strength Training Using Unstable Surfaces on Strength, Power and Balance Performance Across the Lifespan: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis The PEDro Scale for grading evidence The Problem of Transfer with Charlie Reid Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 3 hours and 50 pages of content, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies: Packing the Shoulder Wide Infrasternal Angle

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The Ultimate Guide to Treating Ankle Sprains

A Humdinger No Doubt   Ankle sprains. Such a bugger to deal with.   Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries seen in basketball. The cutting, jumping, contact, fatigue, and poor footwear certainly don’t help matters. Damn near almost every game someone tweaks an ankle. Treating ankle sprains in-game provides quite a different perspective. Rarely in the clinic do we work with someone immediately post-injury. Instead, we deal with the cumulative effects of delayed treatment: acquired impairments, altered movement strategies, and reduced fitness. The pressure is lower and the pace is slower. You shed that mindset with the game on the line. You must do all in your power to get that player back on the court tonight, expediting the return process to the nth degree. I had a problem. Figuring out the most efficient way to treat an ankle sprain was needed to help our team succeed. I searched the literature, therapeutic outskirts, and tinkered in order to devise an effective protocol. The result? We had 12 ankle sprains this past season. After performing the protocol, eight were able to return and finish out the game. Out of the remaining four, three returned to full play in two days. The last guy? He was released two days after his last game. It’s a tough business. The best part was we had no re-sprains. An impressive feat considering the 80% recurrence rate¹.    Caveats aside, treating acute injuries with an aggressive mindset can be immensely effective. Here’s how.

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Manual Therapy Musings

When I think About You… Prompted by some mentee questions and blog comments, I wondered where manual therapy fits in the rehab process. To satisfy my curiosity, I calculated how much time I spend performing manual interventions. Looking at last month’s patient numbers to acquire data, I found these numbers based on billing one patient every 45 minutes (subtracting out evals and reassessments): Nonmanual (including exercise and education) = 80% Manual = 20% Modalities = 0%!!!!!!!!!!!! Delving a bit further, here’s my time spent using PRI manual techniques versus my other manual therapy skill-set: PRI manual = 14% Other manual = 6% As you can see, I use manual therapy a ridiculously low amount; skills that I used to employ liberally with decent success.   There’s a reason for the shift I want my patients to independently improve at all cost and as quickly as possible. The learning process is the critical piece needed to create necessary neuroplastic change; and consequently a successful rehab program. Rarely is learning involved in manual therapy.

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Why Everything Works (and Doesn’t Work)

A Great Place to Be I was recently at my home away from home, IFAST. Every time I go here the following occurs: I have an amazing time with amazing people. I learn a ton and realize how little I really know. Prolific discussions are had. I end up purchasing WAY too many books as soon as I get home. As many of you know, Bill Hartman and I appreciate a PRI philosophy. When I go to IFAST, we inevitably experiment with many different things. This weekend, Bill and I were playing with how many different ways we could achieve full right shoulder internal rotation on my good friend Lance and the lovely IFAST intern Liz. Here was everything that gave these people full motion. Soft tissue mobilization to the infraspinatus. Manually assisted breathing. Tickling the right side of the face. Tapping the left hamstring. Smacking the right glute max (yes, I spanked someone). Having someone think about contracting their right glute max as hard as possible. Having someone watch me breathe with a left sidebend. Reflex locomotion. Now of course, that does not mean you should be spanking your patients and clients with shoulder issues (but if you do make sure it is the right glute), but we have to ask why did all of these different techniques–even the weird ones– achieve the same outcome we wanted? Why Things Work Joseph Brence, a gentleman whose material I enjoy, recently posted a blog showing several different techniques and polling his

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