Diastasis Recti, Useless Exercises, and CRPS – Movement Debrief Episode 45

Movement Debrief Episode 45 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: What is diastasis recti? How does one treat diastasis recti? What exercises are generally time-wasters in the rehab process? What exercises ought to be used instead What is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)? What are some treatment strategies for CRPS? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram.They air every Wednesday at 7pm CST. Enjoy! and the audio version…                    Here were the links I mentioned: Sign-up for the Human Matrix September 15-16th here Unstable surface training Upper body unstable surface training Attention bias in complex regional pain syndrome: it’s not just about the body Space-based, but not arm-based, shift in tactile processing in complex regional pain syndrome and its relationship to cooling of the affected limb  Limb-specific autonomic dysfunction in complex regional pain syndrome modulated by wearing prism glasses Course Notes: Graded Motor Imagery NOI Recognise App Course Notes: Therapeutic Neuroscience Education Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 3 hours and 50 pages of content, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies: Diastasis Recti Useless Exercises CRPS

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Overhead vs Quadruped, Hypersensitivity, and Frozen Shoulder – Movement Debrief Episode 35

Movement Debrief Episode 35 is in the books. Here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure. Here is the set list: How do the overhead and quadruped positions affect infrasternal angles? How does one reduce hypersensitivity in a focal area of longstanding pain? How does one perform treatment on someone with frozen shoulder? How often are there cervicocranial components to frozen shoulder? What other things do we need to be looking at with frozen shoulder? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 7:30pm CST. Enjoy!                  Here were the links I mentioned: Infrasternal Angles NOI Recognise apps CRAFTA – A con ed course on craniocervicalmandibular region Tactile discrimination, but not tactile stimulation alone, reduces chronic limb pain. Acupuncture applied as a sensory discrimination training tool decreases movement-related pain in patients with chronic low back pain more than acupuncture alone: a randomised cross-over experiment “Why Are My Nerves So Sensitive?” By Adriaan Louw Oxygen Advantage  “Unconventional Medicine: Join the Revolution to Reinvent Healthcare, Reverse Chronic Disease, and Create a Practice You Love” by Chris Kresser Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 3 hours and 50 pages of content, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies:   Overhead vs Quadruped Hypersensitivity Frozen Shoulder

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Post 100: Sexifying Upper Quadrant Post-Op

I Wrote a Lot It’s interesting to think how much this blog has changed since I started writing in February 2013. We’ve gone from cliff notes of books, to cliff notes of courses, to the occasional self-musing. While I still plan on reviewing and assimilating courses I take, my hope is to expand and reflect upon whatever is in my brain a smidge more. It makes sense to start this trend with post 100. And today, postoperative care is piquing my interest.   Yes, post-op intervention is a guilty pleasure of mine. And it’s not because it’s easy. Far from easy. Post op treatment gives you a license to create under various constraints. Meaning you have to dig a little deeper to achieve desired goals. I think it can be way sexier, and effective, than your typical post-op protocol BS. So let’s create some successful post-op fun. The First Constraint Before we even talk about specific patients, we have to first look at the largest constraint yet: available tools. At my current digs, I don’t have much of anything in terms of heavyweights. So here is what I have at my disposal that I can implement: 1-on-1 care for 60 minutes Kettlebells: 10, 15, 25 pounds Therabands and theratubes of various sizes Cook bands of various resistances PRI trial orthotics (mouth splints, arch supports, reading glasses, yada) Steps Tape IPAD 3D stretch cage (aka very expensive equipment to tie therabands to) Access to higher level brain centers Heart of gold

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Course Notes: Graded Motor Imagery

I recently attended another great course through the NOI Group called “Graded Motor Imagery” (GMI) taught by Bob Johnson. These guys are the industry leaders in all things pain so please check them out. It was great connecting with Bob and learning what I think will be an excellent adjunct to what I am currently doing. So here is the run down on GMI. Overview GMI is a three-pronged sequential process of establishing early, nonpainful motor programming. Johnson calls this synaptic exercise to limit negative peripheral pain expression. GMI is a 3 step process: 1)      Laterality reconstruction (Implicit Motor Imagery). 2)      Motor imagery (Explicit Motor Imagery). 3)      Mirror Therapy. The Neuromatrix Paradigm & Pain States Before delving into the neuromatrix, we first must define pain. Pain is a multiple system output or expression by an individual-specific pain neuromatrix that activates when the brain concludes that body tissues are in danger and action is required. The neuromatrix, like I talk about in this post here, is the nervous system’s coding space and network. It is first and foremost affected by genetics, sculpted by experience, and constantly evolving. It is the entity that makes us who we are—the self. The neurosignature, or neurotag, is an output’s representation in the brain. For example, regions in the brain will activate in response to produce the pain output. This sequence is the neurosignature. Some common activated areas when pain is expressed include both primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, insula cortex, anterior cingulgate cortex, thalamus, basal

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