Influential Studies, Piriformis Syndrome, and Screwing the Feet – Movement Debrief Episode 59

Movement Debrief Episode 59 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: What are the top two studies that have influenced my practice? What is piriformis syndrome? How do I treat piriformis syndrome? What is screwing the feet? What position should the foot be in for squatting? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram.They air every Wednesday at 7pm CST. Enjoy! and the audio version…                    Here were the links I mentioned: Sign-up for the Human Matrix in Seattle, WA on September 15-16th here Sign up for the Human Matrix in Kansas City, KS on October 27-28th here   Sign-up for the Human Matrix in Portland, OR on November 10-11 here Read here to learn more about Human Matrix Coordinative variability and overuse injury Pat Davidson Mechanics of the respiratory muscles Here is the debrief on hip extension Below is a good move to improve hip internal rotation Below is a good move to improve hip external rotation Below is the slump test Eric Oetter Below is an excerpt from a message I got from a bright PT student and zaccupples.com employee, Kris Camelio (Instagram, Twitter), in regards to the “foot screwing out” piece. I thought you may enjoy. Pronation during squat makes the foot segment mobile and thus offers less stability for the rest of

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May 2018 Links and Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets. Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on in May. If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend.

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Glute Amnesia, Lateral Shifts, and Evidence Based Practice – Movement Debrief Episode 50

Movement Debrief Episode 50 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: What is gluteal amnesia? Is gluteal amnesia a thing? What needs to be done to get the glutes working? What is a lateral shift? Do shift corrections work? How should you handle working with someone with a lateral shift? What is evidence based practice? What does it mean to say you are evidence based? Can we possibly do everything 100% evidence-based? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram.They air every Wednesday at 7pm CST. Enjoy! and the audio version…                  Here were the links I mentioned: Sign-up for the Human Matrix in Seattle, WA on September 15-16th here Sign up for the Human Matrix in Kansas City, KS on October 28-29th here   Sign-up for the Human Matrix in Portland, OR on November 10-11 here Here is the Instagram post I mentioned in reference to glute amnesia Here is the powerpoint discussing lateral shift Manual Correction of an Acute Lumbar Lateral Shift: Maintenance of Correction and Rehabilitation: A Case Report with Video Bryan Chung The acute:chronic workload ratio predicts injury: high chronic workload may decrease injury risk in elite rugby league players Mike McKenney   Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 3 hours and 50 pages of content, a free acute:chronic workload

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December Links and Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets. Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on in December If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend. Biggest Lesson of the Month I’ve been thinking a lot about generalism and specialism. Becoming a generalist involves implementing things with an individual that intend to have systemic effects, whereas the specialist implements things that intend to have a specific effect. Think about encouraging your clients to sleep effectively, eat more vegetables, and move effectively. Implementing these three strategies will lead to system-wide effects first and foremost, and may impact a specific goal that you have. These are the tools of a generalist On the flipside, consider a surgical procedure, medication, etc. These modalities have a higher likelihood of meeting a specific goal first and foremost, but the system-wide effect is less certain. Though upon careful reflection on this thought, really anything we implement as a generalist or specialist is riddled with uncertainty. Both types of practitioners are necessary to maximize health, longevity, and/or performance. Quote of the Month “Ego is about who’s right. Truth is about what’s right.” ~Mike Maples Jr Ego is something I’ve been working on getting control of over the last year, and it has been most

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How to Organize Journals, Blogs, and Articles

You wake up, make your bed, do your ahem, bathroom business, then slowly sulk your way to the kitchen to get some coffee brewing. While the good stuff brews, you open up your computer and decide to check what’s going on in the good old internet today. Then it happens. You see 20 new blogs on your blogroll, Facebook has shared 13 different posts that sound unbelievable, but oh wait, check out that tweet showing Tim Ferriss finally interviewed Zac Cupples (#dreaming), and then oh snap, Eminem just dropped another new song on Spotify! And then you accomplish nothing. I see this problem time and time again with many of the mentees that I work with, and I occasionally fall into the trap myself. We see so many interesting articles coming out on a regular basis, and the pull from FOMO is real. With so much to consume and so little time, what are we to do? The short answer: consume at the right time. Yes, the learning process has to involve impeccable timing with consumption. I’ve spoken about just in time learning ad nauseam (here and here), and it is key to both solving problems and retentaining new information. Consuming a cornucopia of random posts, articles, podcasts, and Youtube videos without direction is a recipe for time wasting.  You fleet from one cool article to the next and…oh wait, what was that last article about? We’ve all been there, and the struggle is real. So how do we overcome this nerd FOMO

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November Links and Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets. Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on from this past August. If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend. Biggest Lesson of the Month Don’t beat yourself up if you aren’t hitting perfection day in and day out. Consistent progress over time is the key. There have been many days where I wasn’t motivated to stay on task, and faltered. The key to getting back on the proverbial horse the next day was to not beat myself up. Instead, acknowledge that these things happen, understand I’m human, and get after it the next day. You’d be amazed at what this shift in perspective can do. Quote of the Month “Greatness is a lot of small things done daily” ~ MJ Demarco MJ Demarco again takes the cake this month. This quote made me reflect a lot on just how many small, quality habits, can make an impact on life. What small things can you do to become great? Hike of the Month A late steal this month, but got a chance to check out Death Valley National Park. I wasn’t really sure what to expect with this place since, ya know, it’s hot and things are kinda dead

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Squats, the (F)Utility of Research, Total Knees, and Pain vs. Suffering – Movement Debrief Episode 18

Just in case you missed last night’s Movement Debrief Episode 18, here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure. in this debrief, I was stumped! Andrew from Facebook asked a phenomenal question on the biomechanics of the squat, which led to great discussion on what it means and takes to squat.  Great contributions from Dani and Jonathan to the discussion. Here were all the topics: How I use research Influences on full knee extension and flexion post-operatively Changing perception of rehab post-total knee arthroplasty The problems with chasing pain Pain vs. suffering What is squatting, what it means, and the biomechanicsIf you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST. Enjoy.                  Here were the links I mentioned tonight Pain and Stress in a Systems Perspective: Reciprocal Neural, Endocrine and Immune Interactions On the (f)utility of pain Subscribe to the debrief on Itunes Join my mentorship program, get a movement consultation, or let me design an online fitness program for you. Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies: The (F)Utility of Research Total Knees Pain vs. Suffering Squats  

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The Sensitive Nervous System Chapter XIII: Research and Neurodynamics: Is Neurodynamics Worthy of Scientific Merit?

This is a summary of Chapter XIII of “The Sensitive Nervous System” by David Butler. Intro Research has demonstrated that often evidenced-based medicine is low on the list for why clinicians choose a particular treatment. From an ethical standpoint, it is important to consider evidence. This chapter is very short so I will just provide the highlights that I got from it. Appraising a New Theory or Approach There are six criteria that a new theory should be evaluated by: 1)      Support from anatomical and physiological evidence. 2)      Designed for a specific population. 3)      Studies from peer-reviewed journals. 4)      Include a well-designed randomized controlled trial or single experiment. 5)      Present potential side effects. 6)      Proponents discuss and are open to limitations. Agreement Here are some definitions of different ways research measures agreement. –          Cohen’s Kappa: Measures nominal data reliability. >0.75 is excellent agreement. 0.40-0.75 is fair to good. <0.40 is poor. –          Pearson product movement correlation: Measures interval/ratio data. –          ICC: Measures continuous data. The closer to 1, the better. Validity There are also many different validity types defined throughout this chapter. The first two are proven through logic and have the least evidence support. –          Construct Validity: Valid relative to a theoretical foundation. –          Content Validity: Can I use this measure to make an inference? The next two are higher up on the evidence support hierarchy. –          Convergent Validity: The test shows a correlation between two variables. –          Discriminant Validity: The test shows a low correlation between two variables.

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