Functional Muscle Contractions

Compression, expansion, limitations, oh my! Have you ever wondered how muscle contractions impact movement? Or why in the hell we are using fancy terms like compression, expansion, all that mess? Or how does tissue tension create movement limitations? I get it, the terminology and stuff can be confusing AF, but passing that learning curve will allow you to: Figure out why movement limitations happen Better make decisions based on the infrasternal angle Determine how loading changes contractile orientations Are you ready to take your programming and exercise selection to the next level? Then check out Movement Debrief Episode 130!

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Too Much Traps, Hand Health, and Arthritis – Movement Debrief Episode 92

Movement Debrief Episode 92 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: Why do some people have too much trap and neck tension while they reach? How do I cue reaching without using the neck What are some key components of hand health? What are the different hand positions one should be able to achieve? What different grips should one be able to perform? What are some good ways to improve hand health? What is arthritis? Does arthritis correlate with pain? What treatments are useful for arthritis?

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The Reckoning: Part Deux Course Review

I recently had the opportunity to attend The Reckoning: Part Deux, a course taught by Dr. Pat Davidson and Dr. Ben House. The host was my boi, Mike Ranfone. This course focused on two concepts: understanding evolutionary history to influence programming (Pat’s talk),  and discussing all things hypertrophy, fat loss, health, and nutrition (Ben’s talk). I’ve heard Pat speak in the past, and always appreciate his drawing from many aspects of science to influence programming. His evolution discussion led to many light bulbs going off. What had me really excited was to hear Ben speak. I have several colleagues who speak highly of his work, and given that nutrition/functional medicine is a weak point in my game, I wanted to hear his perspective. Let’s just say, neither of the doctors disappointed. There was an excellent mix of theoretical and practical application, and both fellas approached performance from such different angles that the Reckoning as a whole was beyond comprehensive. If you get a chance to hear either of these guys talk, sign up yesterday, you won’t regret it.

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The Sensitive Nervous System Chapter X: Neurodynamic Tests in the Clinic

 This is a summary of Chapter X of “The Sensitive Nervous System” by David Butler. The Tests When assessing neurodynamics, there is a general system that is used including the following tests: Passive neck flexion (PNF). Straight leg raise (SLR). Prone knee bend (PKB). Slump. 4 different upper limb neurodynamic tests (ULNT). I will demonstrate these tests for you in later chapters. Many clinicians when discussing the lower extremity-biased tests deem that maybe only one or two of the tests need to be performed, however this assertion is erroneous. Slump, SLR, and PNF all need to be tested as a cluster. The reason being is that the clinical responses may often differ. This difference is especially noticeable when comparing the SLR and the slump. These two are not equal tests for the following reasons: Components are performed in a different order. Spine position is different. Patients may be more familiar with the SLR, therefore give more familiar responses. The patient is in control during the slump, not in the SLR. The slump is more provocative. Rules of Thumb When testing neurodynamics, here are the following guidelines: 1)      Active before passive. 2)      Differentiate structures – add/subtract other movements to see if symptoms can change. 3)      Document the test order. Positive Test The positive testing here is a little dated based on what Butler’s group and the research says as of right now. Based on what I have learned from Adriaan Louw, having any of the following is what constitutes a positive

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