Super Flat T-Spines, Strokes, and Running Form – Movement Debrief Episode 91

Movement Debrief Episode 91 is in the books. Below is a copy of the video for your viewing pleasure, and audio if you can’t stand looking at me. Here is the set list: First, an addendum on the big toe.  What needs to happen for posterior thorax expansion? What activities and techniques should one use for someone who really struggles getting air in the posterior thorax? How does my model apply to someone with a stroke? Any particular activities useful for someone with a stroke? Are there any particular cues or recommendation I have for running form?

Read More

Recognizing and Changing Nonverbal Communication Disorders: An Interaction Approach

I was at my local coffee shop the other day chatting with my barista as she prepared my drink. Once it was all said and done and I paid, she wished that I had a glorious day. Glorious is not a word you hear often and definitely caught me ear. You might even say it was salient! I have this thing when someone uses an uncommon descriptor. When this occurs, I typically try to use an even more ridiculous descriptor. I especially like to apply this method to wish someone a better day than I. For example: Joe Blow: “You have a good day.” Me: “You have an even better day.” Glorious is a bit more difficult to top, but in the blink of an eye I was able to respond: “You have a splendiferous day.” Stupid? Yes. Did I get a laugh and a smile? Absolutely. Me doing this silly little thing with people is irrelevant. What is relevant is the speed that I was able to apply this quip. I spouted this word quickly because it fit a common pattern. Pattern recognition is huge in athleticism, medicine, and a multitude of other life facets. But how often do we think of pattern recognition when we interact with individuals? Being able to differentiate what both verbal and nonverbal communication one uses is critical in ensuring a favorable interaction with someone. And if your patient or client doesn’t like you? Fugetaboutit. Let’s look at a very common pattern that if you allow

Read More

Course Notes: Dermoneuromodulation

What? You Mean You Have to Touch Someone???!!?!? My gluttony for punishment continues. This time, I had the pleasure of learning Diane Jacobs’ manual therapy approach called Dermoneuromodulation (DNM). My travels took me to Entropy Physiotherapy and Wellness in the Windy City. These folks were arguably the best course hosts I have ever had. We had lunch!!!! Both days!!!!! That is unheard of, so a big thanks to Sandy and Sarah for putting the course together. I took DNM out of curiosity. I have been lurking around Somasimple on and off for the past couple years, and wanted to learn more about the methods championed there. Believe it or not, I have yet to take a pure manual therapy course, DNM seemed like a great way to get my hands dirty. That darn PRI has lessened the hand representation in my somatosensory homunculus!   One reason I haven’t taken a manual course is due to the explanatory models many classes are presenting. It seems as though few are approaching things with a neurological mindset, but I was pleased to hear Diane’s model. It is the best explanation I have heard yet. I know that I usually list my favorite quotes at the end of the blog, but I wanted to share the best quote of the weekend right off the bat: “I don’t know why.” I heard this phrase so much throughout the course and it was quite refreshing. Diane made few claims about her technique, admitted who she “stole”

Read More