August 2019 Links and Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets. Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on in August. If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend.

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July 2018 Links and Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets. Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on in July. If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend.

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Recommended Resources

I oftentimes get asked what resources I recommend. The resources listed below have been essential at putting me down the path that I am currently going, and have shaped how I practice today. The cool thing about this list? None of these are set in stone. If I find a better resource, or one of the blogs I recommend starts to resonate with me less, it leaves the list (no pressure). I want to give you guys the most up-to-date resources as humanly possible, so please check back here frequently. If you’d like articles and such that are tripping my trigger as of late, you may want to sign up for my newsletter. You’ll also get some access to almost 3 hours and 40+ pages worth of exclusive content on pain and breathing. Here are my resources: Foundational Sciences Video series Makemegenius – A youtube page dedicated to explaining scientific concepts that a kid could understand. Crashcourse – Another series of short videos explaining complex scientific topics and more in 15 minutes or less. I wish I had this in undergrad. Books Gilroy Atlas of Anatomy – Easily the best paper anatomy atlas you can find in the land. The angles drawn, the clarity of pictures, this atlas has it all. Wait until you see the subocciptals from the side. #mindblown Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology – Easily the best and most comprehensive physiology textbook in the land, the depth at which this book dives into with concepts

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Chapter 2.1: Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Developmental Kinesiology: Breathing Stereotypes and Postural Locomotion Function

This is a chapter 2.1 summary of “Recognizing and Treating Breathing Disorders” by Leon Chaitow. You’re Writing About DNS???!!??! Yes, I am. Pavel Kolar and crew actually contributed to quite a few chapters in this edition, and this one here was overall very well written. Believe it or not, it even had quite a few citations! Why they don’t cite many references in their classes is beyond me, but that’s another soapbox for another day. Onward to a rock-solid chapter. Developmental Diaphragm En utero, the diaphragm’s origin begins in the cervical region, which could possibly have been an extension of the rectus abdominis muscle.  As development progresses, the diaphragm caudally descends and tilts forward. When the child is between 4-6 months old, the diaphragm reaches its final position. Throughout this period, the diaphragm initially is used for respiratory function only. As we progress through the neonatal period (28 days), we see the diaphragm progress postural and sphincter function. The diaphragm is integral for developing requisite stability to move. Achieving movement involves co-activation of the diaphragm, abdominal, back, and pelvic muscles. This connectivity assimilates breathing, posture, and movement. If this system develops properly, we see the highest potential for motor control. The largest developmental changes in this system occur at 3 months. Here we see the cervical and thoracic spine straighten and costal breathing initiate. 4.5 months show extremity function differentiation, indicating a stable axial skeleton to which movement may occur. Further progression occurs at 6 months. Here costal breathing is

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Course Notes: DNS Summit

Why? In my short time out I have gotten heavily into the influence that breathing has on the nervous system. Obviously PRI has been my favorite explanation thus far, but the DNS approach had me intrigued. The summit is the first of two DNS courses that I took this past week. This summit was the first of its kind, and was an amalgamation of many different speakers. Unfortunately, this summit was mostly review and wrought with little innovation. Here are some of the big points I got from a few of the speakers. “Developmental Kinesiology: Three Levels of Motor Control in Assessment and Treatment of the Motor System” by Dr. Alena Kobesova There are three levels of development: spinal, subcortical, and cortical Spinal level of motor control is primitive reflexes; subcortical motor control is core stability; cortical motor control includes individual patterns. DNS suggests inhibiting primitive reflexes instead of facilitating them for function. Core stabilization occurs first at 4.5 months development, then locomotion follows. All movement patterns are either ipsilateral or contralateral. The former develops in supine, and the latter in prone. “DNS Among Elite Athletes – MLB” by PJ Mainville Didn’t get much out of this one except PJ dancing around PRI 🙂 Recommended using theratube around the wrist so you can perform hand movements with PNF patterns as such.  “DNS in Gynecological and Obstetrics Disorders” by Martina Jezkova When in quadruped, the pelvic floor does not create a base for the trunk and had no postural function. The

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