Course Notes: FMS Level 2

Mobility, Stability, and the Like I recently attended the FMS Level 2 course after rocking the home study. In my quest to take every con ed course known to man, I got into the functional movement people because the idea of improving movement over isolation exercise interests me. I find the way they build up to the patterns very logical, namely because they liberally use PNF and developmental principles; and they do so quite eloquently. But really, I wanted to go to this class so I could meet and learn from Gray Cook. And his segments did not disappoint. While I may not agree with everything he says, he is a very brilliant man and knows movement. The only disappointment I have to say about this course was that I did not get enough Gray and Lee. I would say I probably saw them teach 30% of the time, with another FMS instructor just running us through their algorithms. I am sorry, but if you are going to advertise Gray Cook and Lee Burton as the instructors, then I want Gray and Lee instructing me! A lot of these exercises were review for me, but there were definitely some tweaks that I liked a great deal. I think if you are new to more motor control-based exercises, this course is great for you. Just make sure you are taking it from Gray and/or Lee. Why Screen? The FMS is predominately used to manage risk and prioritize exercise selection. They look

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Movement Chapter 10: Understanding Corrective Strategies

This is a chapter 10 summary of the book “Movement” by Gray Cook. Mistakes, I’ve Made a Few When we are talking corrective exercise design, people often make 4 mistakes: 1)      Protocol approach: Exercise based on category. Problem – 1 size fits all. 2)      Basic kinesiology: Target prime movers and some stabilizers. Problem – fails on timing, motor control, stability, and movement. 3)      Appearance of functional approach – Use bands and resistance during functional training. Problem – If the pattern is poor, adding challenges to it can increase compensation. There is also no pre-post testing. 4)      Prehabilitation approach – Prepackaged rehab exercises into conditioning programs as preventative measures to reduce injury risk. Problem – Design is based on injuries common to particular activities as opposed to movement risk factors. There are also certain mistakes that are often made when utilizing the FMS and SFMA: 1)      Converting movement dysfunction into singular anatomical problems. 2)      Obsessing over perfection in each test instead of identifying the most significant limitation/asymmetry. 3)      Linking corrective solutions to movement problems prematurely. The overarching rule is to address these movement deficiencies first, as we do not want to put strength or fitness on top of dysfunctional movement.   The Performance Pyramid When designing an exercise program, we look for three areas to improve performance: Movement, performance, and skill.   It is important that program design is based on the individual’s needs and has these qualities in a hierarchal fashion. For example, if one performs excellent on functional performance

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Movement Chapter 6: Functional Movement Screen Descriptions

This is a chapter 6 summary of the book “Movement” by Gray Cook. Screening Keys The FMS is not considered a training or competition tool; it simply ranks movements.  Here are the keys to a successful screen. First off, know the following bony landmarks Tibial tuberosity ASIS Lateral and medial malleoli Most distal wrist crease Knee joint line 3 repetitions are performed for each movement, and it is important to stand far away so the whole movement can be seen. When testing both sides, take the lowest score if an asymmetry is present. Here are the movements (videos courtesy of Smart Group Training). The Deep Squat Purpose: Full-body coordinated mobility and stability; linking the hips and the shoulders. Here is how it is done. Hurdle Step Purpose: Evaluate stepping and stride mechanics. Here is how it is done. Inline Lunge Purpose: Test deceleration and left/right function utilizing contralateral upper extremity patterns and ipsilateral lower extremity patterns. Here is how it is done. Shoulder Mobility Purpose: Evaluate scapulothoracic rhythm, thoracic spine and rib mobility. Here is how it is done. ASLR Purpose: Tests hip flexion, hip extension, and core function. Here is how it is done. Trunk Stability Pushup Purpose: Tests reflexive core stability. Here is how it is done. Rotary Stability Purpose: Check multi-planar pelvic, core, and shoulder girdle stability. Also looks at reflexive stability and transverse plane weight shifting. Here is how it is done. FMS Conclusions The FMS is designed to give a corrective pathway that may involve

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Course Notes: The Elite Speed Seminar

I just finished up the Elite Speed Seminar at what has become my home away from home, Indianapolis Fitness and Sports Training. The presenters were Lee Taft and Nick Winkelman, and I learned a great deal in an area that I am weak in. Here are the notes and quotes. Multi-Directional Speed Tools That Make Change – Lee Taft Lee talked about 5 qualities to train that separate great from good athletes. Performing well under urgency, as sympathetic states change how we move. Reactivity – These are reacting to finite reactions, such as a gun going off in a sprint. Random reaction – This uses the stretch-shortening cycle more frequently by foot repositioning. Think a shortstop. Tactics – Reacting to fakes and deception. Mistake Recovery – Training to recover from worst case scenarios. Here were Lee’s recommendations for program design. Skill acquisition – The ability to control desired movements. This portion can be trained by either skill components (3-4 exercises), skill itself (1-3 exercises), or linking skills (shuffle to sprint). Force application – Performing the desired movement patterns with increased force or resistance. Random reactive training – Challenge movements under a random setting, but make sure the above 2 components are rock solid first. Here were Lee’s recommendations to progress to reactive training Acceleration → deceleration → Change of direction →One direction reaction → Multi-direction reaction. Some great cues that Lee used Stay in the tunnel. Arms long and strong. Tear the paper – Get in the athletic position, load the big toes, and try to rip

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