Becoming an Effective and Efficient Leader – Kyle Dobbs

Do you struggle setting up efficient systems so you can get things done? Do you have a hard time establishing and building a culture in your office or within yourself? Are you uncertain on how you best function in the workforce? Then you probably want to listen to today’s interview with Kyle Dobbs, who owns Compound Performance in Saint Louis, Missouri and this is his thing. Aside from being an awesome coach, he focuses with personal trainers, coaches, physical therapists, as well as gyms on building exactly what I just said: establishing the culture, making sure that leaders are in place in managing people effectively, making systems efficient so we can maximize revenue streams and results. And he talks a lot about personality archetyping as well in this very long but very awesome interview. I hope that you like it, I hope you get as much out of it as I did. And without further ado, let’s give Kyle Dobbs a shot.

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Speeches, Hip Openers, and PRI vs DNS – Movement Debrief Episode 32

Movement Debrief Episode 32 is in the books. Here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure. Here is the set list: How do I organize a talk or course? How do I get speaking engagements? Should we be performing hip openers? How do I integrate PRI and DNS into rehab and performance? Is there a dichotomy between PRI and DNS? Why we need to transcend commercial models What things I am learning now Why a clamshell won’t destroy Usain Bolt   If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 7:30pm CST. Enjoy!                    Here were the links I mentioned: Explain Pain Supercharged Slideology Sign up for my newsletter to access my Practical Pain Education and Respiration Revisited talk Ben Fergus guest post on squatting Effect of Changes in Pelvic Tilt on Range of Motion to Impingement and Radiographic Parameters of Acetabular Morphologic Characteristics An Anatomic Investigation of the Obers Test Barking Up the Wrong Tree: The Surprising Science Behind Why Everything You Know About Success Is (Mostly) Wrong  Oxygen Advantage Enhancing Life Method Strength Andy Mccloy  Trevor LaSarre Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 3 hours and 50 pages of content, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies:   Speeches Hip Openers PRI vs DNS

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Help Any Client Achieve Their Goals

I recently did a little spot on IFAST University regarding how I approach, assess, and progress people along the physical activity continuum. Read the little intro  below, and if you want to watch the video, click on the picture or the link. As a bonus, I put together a little PDF outlining how I improve the movement variability side of physical activity. If you sign up for IFAST University, you’ll get access to it. Without further adieu, here is the post. The Four Step Process to Address Movement Limitations I’m in the business of creating change, but — as you know — that stuff is HARD TO DO. How do you simplify the process? I like to outline things. When thoughts have a directional flow, it’s easier to keep everything straight. So I have to ask myself questions about each and every situation. What kind of person is in front of me? And what am I going to do with him or her? In this post, I’ll outline my process of helping people achieve their health and performance goals. We’ll discuss:The 4 areas where we can start creating change My main area of focus: physical activity The 4 steps physical activity Each step from my physical therapy view Each step from my performance coach view My progression for mobility The 3 active mobility tests I use Testing for arm motion with lower body tests Runners who get pain after they run 5 miles Patients who get back pain after they

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Course Notes: The Last Craniocervical Mandibular Restoration Evahhhhh

You’d Think I’d Learn it the First Time Around You’d think, but CCM is one of the hardest PRI courses to conceptualize.  It didn’t hurt that my work was hosting the Ron’s last time teaching this course, as next year we will see Cervical Revolution instead. I took this course last February, and it’s amazing how different the two courses were. We had a room filled with PRI vets, and the Ronimal went into so much more depth this time around. It was such a great course that I would love to share with you some of the clarified concepts. If you want a course overview, take a look here.  The TMCC  The right TMCC pattern consists of the following muscles with the following actions: Cranial retruders/mandibular protruders Right anterior temporalis Right Masseter Right medial pterygoid Sphenobasilar flexors Left rectus capitis posteror major Left obliquus capitis OA flexors that maintain appropriate cervical lordosis Right rectus capitis anterior Right longus capitis Right longus colli If this chain stays tonically active, then there is better accessory muscle respiratory capacity present. These muscles provide the fixed point needed for an apical breathing pattern. We want the muscles on the other side, the left TMCC, to be active. Their activity will allow alternating reciprocal cranial function to be possible. We also call this gait.  Keep Ya Sphenoid Flexed One cranial goal we have is to achieve sphenobasilar flexion, but what does this mean? In the RTMCC pattern, the sphenoid is in an extended position.

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Course Notes: THE Jen Poulin’s PRI Myokinematic Restoration

Intro Another retake course is in the books to prep for my PRC testing. This time, it was Myokinematic Restoration with THE Jen Poulin held at Indianapolis Fitness and Sports Training. This class was my Midwest going away present to myself. IFAST has become a second home to me, and any time I can spend with the folks from there I cherish. Plus ma and pa wouldn’t be too happy with me if I didn’t 🙂 I also had yet to take a course instructed by Jen, so I was very curious to hear her perspective on the PRI science. I won’t go into the Myokin nitty-gritty like I did here, but what I will do is go into concepts that were cleaned up for me this time around. Want to know what I learned? Let’s do it!   PRI Patterns = Primitive Reflexes Ron Hruska just doesn’t make shit up. Right off the bat Jen stated that the patterns were based off of primitive reflexes that can be elicited in everyone. And for you EBP folks, this is demonstrated here and here. The left AIC has its origins from the asymmetrical tonic neck reflex, and the PEC from tonic labyrinthine reflex.   and the PEC from the tonic labyrinthine reflex   Jen was the first person to state this claim outright, and to hear it in the basic of basic courses…It made my heart melt. You Down with Several P’s? Yeah You Know Me. Another big thing Jen discussed was

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Course Notes: PRI Vision Postural Visual Integration

Explosive I am still picking up the white matter that exploded all over the pavement as I left the PRI Vision course that was hosted in Grayslake, IL. It was an excellent experience interacting with Ron and Heidi, and believe it or not they are familiar with my blog…and the corresponding pictures. Therefore I was the butt of many jokes this past weekend, which definitely made me feel at home with the PRI family that I have so grown fond of. There is a reason it has taken me so long to put this work up. These notes have been the most challenging I have written yet, as the material was way out of what I have normally been studying. It is this class however, that solidifies PRI methodology as grounded in neurology. It was two days of brain, autonomics, vision, and optometry. I will do my best to show you what I learned in a semi-understandable manner. Seeing Visions Definition – “The deriving of meaning and the directing of action as a product of the processing of information triggered by a selected band of radiant energy.” – Robert Kraskin Vision is not just what we see, it is what drives us to make decisions.  It is a skill that we develop as we age. It is the dominant sense in the brain, as 70% of the brains connections are related to vision. Vision can and does become lateralized. Sight is the clarity of our visual field, which is slightly

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PRI and Pain Science: Yes You Can Do It

Questions You may have noticed that my blogging frequency has been a little slower than the usual, and I would like to apologize for that. I am in the midst of creating my first course that I am presenting to my coworkers. It has been a very exciting yet time-consuming process. It makes me excited and more motivated to someday start teaching more on the reg. Ever since I started blogging people started asking me questions. These range from many topics regarding physical therapy, career advice, and the like. Some of the more frequent ones include: What courses should I look at? Any advice for a new grad? Seriously, Bane. What’s the deal? But the one I get asked more often then not is as follows: “Zac, how do you integrate PRI into a pain science model?” A great question indeed, especially to those who are relatively unfamiliar with PRI. With all the HG, GH, AF, FA, and FU’s, it’s easy to get lost in the anatomical explanations. Hell, the company even has the word (gasp) “posture” in the title. Surely they cannot think that posture and pain are correlated. I think there is a lot of misinformation regarding PRI’s methodology and framework. What needs to be understood is that PRI is a systematic, biopsychosocial approach that predominately (though not exclusively) deals with the autonomic nervous system. The ANS is very much linked into pain states, though not a causative factor. But of course, that may not be enough. Perhaps

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Course Notes: PRI Pelvis Restoration

Just recently attended another excellent PRI course taught by Lori Thomsen and new instructor Jesse Ham called Pelvis Restoration. The weekend was filled with great discussion about inlets, outlets, shoes, and many other pearls that helped solidify my PRI understanding. So without further ado, let’s summarize. If this is your first reading on a PRI course, it may be beneficial to review my post on Myokinematic Restoration. PRI 101 Jesse started off the class discussing some PRI basic philosophical tenets. In PRI, we talk a great deal about position, which will be defined as a stance or posture at one point in time. Or as Jesse defined it, a position one can maintain for an extended period of time without pain. With this operational definition, our goal as a PRI clinician or trainer is to organize activities in the following order: Reposition – inhibit muscle chains. Retrain – Facilitate muscle chains Restore – Create reciprocal alternating activity (using all muscle chains when it is desired). Reciprocal activity is defined as going from one end-range to another (extension to flexion) and alternating activity is switching from one side of the body to another (right to left stance). When we alternate, the joint on one side of the body ought to do the exact opposite at the other side. With the above treatment hierarchy, we are working on allowing positional freedom within the person being treated. We call this movement in multiple planes. Now the Pelvis This part is where things can

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The Post Wonderful Time of the Year: Top Posts of 2013

The Best…Around Time is fun when you are having flies. It seems like just yesterday that I started up this blog, and I am excited and humbled by the response I have gotten. Hearing praise from my audience keeps me hungry to learn and educate more. I am always curious to see which pages you enjoyed, and which were not so enjoyable; as it helps me tailor my writing a little bit more. And I’d have to say, I have a bunch of readers who like the nervous system 🙂 I am not sure what the next year will bring in terms of content, as I think the first year anyone starts a blog it is more about the writing process and finding your voice. Regardless of what is written, I hope to spread information that I think will benefit those of you who read my stuff. The more I can help you, the better off all our patients and clients will be. So without further ado, let’s review which posts were the top dogs for this year (and some of my favorite pics of course). 10.  Lessons from a Student: The Interaction This was probably one of my favorite posts to write this year, as I think this area is sooooooo under-discussed. Expect to be hearing more on patient interaction from me in the future. 9) Clinical Neurodynamics Chapter 1: General Neurodynamics Shacklock was an excellent technical read. In this post we lay out some nervous system basics, and

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Chapter 5: Interaction of Psychological and Emotional Effects with Breathing Dysfunction

This is a chapter 5 summary of “Multidisciplinary Approaches to Breathing Pattern Disorders” by Leon Chaitow. The second edition will be coming out this December, and you can preorder it by clicking on the link or the photo below. Intro This chapter is dedicated to showing the connection between the body and consciousness; how our psyche is influenced by breathing and vice versa. This chapter was easily my favorite out of the entire book. Breathing Strategies Optimal breathing involves moderate abdominal expansion, some intercostal involvement, and minimal involvement of accessory muscles. Conversely, chest breathing is dominated by accessory muscle use. These two breathing styles are merely end points on a continuum rather than discrete categories. In terms of which strategy is used, chest breathing is often the preferred route for consciously mediated intentional breathing; whereas abdominal breathing is the main route for relaxed, automatic breathing. One reason you would want to override automatic breathing is to prepare for sudden action. At the onset of exercise, ventilation immediately jumps.  This change occurs via three phases, with the first phase occurring independent of exercise load. This phase is a conscious exercise preparatory action. The other increases occur as exercise demands increase. When we are in an emergency situation, these breathing phases change. Prior to the initial pre-action deep breath comes a breath holding phase, which helps increase sensory organ stability. These preparatory breathing changes are great for imminent danger or action, but problematic when threats are non-physical and in the future.  While

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Course Notes: Mobilisation of the Nervous System

I Have an Addiction It seems the more and more that I read the more and more and read the more and more addicted I become to appreciating the nervous system and all its glory. To satisfy this addiction, I took Mobilisation of the Nervous System with my good friend Bob Johnson of the NOI Group. This was the second time I have taken this course in a year’s span and got so much more value this time around. I think the reason for this enrichment has been the fact that I have taken many of their courses prior and that I prepared by reading all the NOI Group’s books. A course is meant to clarify and expand on what you have already read. So if you are not reading the coursework prior, you are not maximizing your learning experience. What made this course so much more meaningful was being surrounded by a group of like-minded and intelligent individuals. As many of you know, I learned much of my training through Bill Hartman. Myself, Bill, the brilliant Eric Oetter and Matt Nickerson, my good friend Scott, and my current intern Stephanie, all attended. When you surround yourself with folks smarter than you, the course understanding becomes much greater. This course was so much more with the above individuals, so thank you. Try to attend courses with like-minded folks. Here are the highlights of what I learned. If you would like a more in-depth explanation of these concepts, check out my

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Chapter 1: General Neurodynamics

This is a Chapter 1 summary of “Clinical Neurodynamics” by Michael Shacklock.  Concepts When we first started working with the nervous system, oftentimes we called pathological processes adverse neural tension. The problem with this name was that it left out nervous system physiology; it was mere mechanical concepts. Hence, we call the movement and physiology of the nervous system neurodynamics. General neurodynamics account for whole body fundamental mechanisms, regardless of region. Specific neurodynamics, on the other hand, applies to particular body regions to account for local anatomical and biomechanical idiosyncrasies. The System There are three parts to the neurodynamic structure: 1)      The mechanical interface 2)      The neural structures 3)      The innervated tissues The mechanical interface is that which is near the nervous system. It consists of materials such as tendon, muscle, bone, intervertebral discs, ligaments, fascia, and blood vessels. The neural structures are those which make up the nervous system. These structures include the connective tissues that forms the meninges (pia, arachnoid, and dura mater) and peripheral nervous system (mesoneurium, epineurium, epineurium, and endoneurium). The nervous system has mechanical functions of tension, movement, and compression. It also has physiological functions to include intraneural blood flow, impulse conduction, axonal transport, inflammation, and mechanosensitivity. The innervated tissues are simply any tissues that are innervated by the nervous system. They provide causal mechanisms for patient complaints, and are able to create nerve motion. When we have neural problems, sometimes the best treatment is to these structures. You must treat everything affected. Mechanical Functions

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