Course Notes: PRI Postural Visual Integration: The 2nd Viewing

Would You Look at That It was a little over a year ago that I took PRI vision and was blown away. A little bit after that, I went through the PRIME program to become an alternating and reciprocal warrior. I had learned so much about what they do in PRI vision that I was feeling somewhat okay with implementation. Then my friends told me about the updates they made in this course.   I signed up as quickly as possibly, and am glad I did. This course has reached a near-perfect flow and the challenging material is much more digestible. Don’t expect to know the what’s and how’s of Ron and Heidi’s operation. And realistically, you probably don’t need to. Your job as a clinician is to take advantage of what the visual system can do, implement that into a movement program, and refer out as needed. This blog will try to explain the connection between these two systems. If you want more of the nitty-gritty programming, I strongly recommend reading my first round with this course. Otherwise, you might be a little lost. Let’s do it.

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Course Notes: Cantrell’s Impingement and Instability, 2015 Edition

Third Time’s a Charm  A trip home and hearing Mike Cantrell preach the good PRI word? I was sold. Impingement and Instability is one of those courses that I could take yearly and still get so many gems. In fact, I probably will end up taking it yearly—it’s that good. I took I&I last year with Cantrell (and the year before that with James), and the IFAST rendition was a completely different course. Cantrell provided the most PRI clinical applications I have seen at any course, which is why he continues to be one of my favorite people to learn from. Basically, if you haven’t learned from Mike yet, I pity you. Get to it! I have way too many gems in my notes to discuss, so here are a few big takeaways.

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Course Notes: PRI Cervical Revolution REMIX

Note: I made some errors on the first rendition of this blog that were corrected after speaking with Eric Oetter. Courtesy to him, Lori Thomsen, and Ron Hruska for cleaning up some concepts. Four Months Later When the Lori Thomsen says to come to Cervical Revolution, you kinda have to listen. I was slightly hesitant to attend since I had taken this course back in January. I mean, it was only the 3rd course rendition. How much could have changed?   Holy schnikes! It is simply amazing what four months of polishing can do. It was as though I attended a completely different course. Did I get it all figured out? No. But the clarity gained this weekend left me feeling a lot better about this very complex material. This is a course that will only continue to get better with time; if you have a chance to attend please do. Let’s now have a moment of clarity.   Biomechanics 101 The craniocervical region is the most mobile section of the vertebral column. This mobility allows regional sensorimotor receptors to provide the brain accurate information on occipital position and movement. The neck moves with particular biomechanics. Fryette’s laws suggest that the cervical spine produces ipsilateral spinal coupling in rotation and sidebending. The OA joint, on the other hand, couples contralaterally. C2 is the regulator of cervical spine motion; much like the first rib regulates rib cage movement. C2 is also important for the mandible, as it balances the cervical spine during

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The Road to an Alternating and Reciprocal Warrior: You down with ENT?

This spans an entire treatment over a year’s time. Here’s part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4   “Yeah you know me.” ~ Naughty By Nature  You know how sometimes when you are treating someone that individual eventually reveals fairly important information that he or she forgot about. Yeah that was totally me. I’ve always had a stuffy nose as far back as I can remember; especially in the winter. The only time breathing felt incredibly easy was when I was eating paleo in college. I have progressively been losing my sense of smell as well. Must be old age right? When I spoke with Lori Thomsen about my recent experience, she mentioned at Pelvis that attaining neutrality in certain areas but not others could lead to a “pressure cooker” phenomenon. For example, if I have someone with a neutral neck and thorax, lower extremity symptoms may possibly be more common. In my case, I had a neutral pelvis at the time my wisdom teeth were pulled. Pull out wisdom teeth and my nasal airway goes crazy. Guess where the pressure went? It was time to see an ENT. ENT Begins After viewing my CT scan and airway, my ENT concluded I have patho-scoliosis. More specifically, airway scoliosis. He found a deviated septum and some enlarged turbinates. These two factors could have a large impact on my breathing capabilities. To me this made a lot of sense. If you read this article, a nostril will drive air to the ipsilateral lung.

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Course Notes: Pelvis Restoration Reflections

Pelvises Were Restored It was another great PRI weekend and I was fortunate enough to host the hilarious Lori Thomsen to teach her baby, Pelvis Restoration. Lori is a very good friend of mine, and we happened to have two of our mentees at the course as well. Needless to say it was a fun family get-together. Lori was absolutely on fire this weekend clearing up concepts for me and she aptly applied the PRI principles on multiple levels. She has a very systematic approach to the course, and is a great person to learn from, especially if you are a PRI noob. Here were some of the big concepts I shall reflect on. If you want the entire course lowdown, read the first time I took the course here.  Extension = Closing Multiple Systems  This right here is for you nerve heads. It turns out the pelvis is an incredibly neurologically rich area. What happens if a drive my pelvis into a position of extension for a prolonged period of time? I’ve written a lot about how Shacklock teaches closing and opening dysfunctions with the nervous system. An extended position here over time would increase tension brought along the pelvic nerves. Increased tension = decreased bloodflow = sensitivity. We can’t just limit it to nerves however, the same would occur in the vasculature and lymphatic system. We get stagnation of many vessels. Perhaps we need to think of extension as system closure; a system closing problem. Flexion will be

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