Course Notes: PRI Integration for Baseball

Another Course in the Books Back in November I had the pleasure of attending a new Baseball PRI affiliate course, taught by my homies Allen Gruver and James Anderson. I really enjoyed this course because it was such a high-level affiliate and great prep for my PRC. We went into great deal regarding position, throwing mechanics, and treatment. A…lot…of…stuff. One of the most amazing pieces of the course was Allen’s ability to breakdown complex baseball movements into their basic biomechanical bits, And from that point show what compensatory things could occur if limitations are present. His eye for these things is unreal. That piece of the course is a post or two on its own, so I won’t touch it here. In fact, I probably won’t touch it at all. Go to this great class and be wowed by Allen. You will be motivated to become a better clinician. I know I was. Here are some of the big takeaways. PRI 101 v 3.0 I’ve heard this overview three times this year now, and it is amazing that I still pick up things from it. James really outdid himself here. The big piece this time around was space. We want space maximized. In the vision course we discussed maximizing left peripheral visual space because the pattern reduces this quality. The pattern in general reduces our ability to move through triplanar space. There are a few other reasons that we would be unable to shift into our left side. Overactive muscles

Read More

Course Notes: PRI Vision Integration for the Baseball Player

The first Section Where I Usually Say Something Like Whew or This Was the Best Course Ever! Phoenix has yet to disappoint on the CEU front, especially if the Dbacks are hosting. What a facility! After the baseball course that my homies Allen Gruver and James Anderson taught, Ron and Heidi put together a small vision course that one could apply on baseball athletes. Only it was so much more than advertised. Whether it was intended or not, the dynamic duo demonstrated just how extensive the PRI principles are, and spoke to many of the neuroscience foundations to which it was founded on. PRI Vision Integration for the Baseball Player was the Batman Begins of PRI. I am going to tell you right now, you must take this course yesterday. The foundational science alone is worth the price of admission, but adding in the visual training and corresponding life lessons, you get way beyond what you expect. Here were the major nuggets that I picked up.  GGGGGG-rav…a…ty (Said as though 50 Cent read the title)  Two major forces are acting upon a body at all times: gravity and ground. When one is able to manage and be aware of these forces, alternating and reciprocal triplanar activity can be realized. This reason is why PRI emphasizes finding the floor and feeling grounded so much.   When these forces go unrecognized within a human system, extension is needed to maintain uprightedness. For example, do you ever notice that some individuals look at

Read More

Course Notes: PRI Impingement and Instability – Cantrell Edition

A Quick Trip Home  I made my first trip back to my roots since moving out west to watch Mike Cantrell’s version of one of my favorite courses: Impingement and Instability. Yes, if you are wondering, my family does hate me for not being able to visit them. Mike absolutely killed all of the various topics we covered, and his ability to coach some of the advanced PRI activities is second to none. I had a blast learning from him. I won’t go over all the nitty gritty like I did here, but here were some of my favorite concepts that we covered. Learn on. The I&I Conundrum  Impingement occurs due to the human system’s conflicting demands. We face a battle between instability and stability. Flexion allows for movement variability, which is desirable in the human system. Variable movement reduces threat perception. However, system flexion leads to increased instability and the risk of falling forward. To combat this risk, impingement may occur by compensatory extension. Extension begets joint and system stability, yet system variability is minimized. Increased stability is desirable when under threat, but not for long term. The “goal” then, would be to build control within flexed instability so the system can stay variable; to remain upright without extension. As Charlie Weingroff would say, we want “control within the presence of change.” That is alternating and reciprocal movement. That doesn’t mean you have to do silly little PRI exercises for the rest of your life. PRI activities are simply neuromuscular training

Read More

Course Notes: PRI Integration for Yoga

Portland is Cool The PRI road show continued on to Portland. This time I learned how PRI integrates with Yoga from the masters—Emily Soiney and James Anderson. Coming into the course I was incredibly biased against Yoga. I’m not a huge fan of crazy mobility expression, which in PRI-land could potentially lead to pathology. Moreover, the crowd that is typically attracted to yoga is of the more flexible variety. Bad news bears. That being said, Emily pleasantly surprised me. With the way Emily teaches Yoga, I see it more now as an expression of moving within your limits; not going beyond those limits like many poses attempt to do. Yoga can be done right, and when it is it’s fahkin’ haad! The goal for PRI-inspired Yoga is to keep the zone of apposition (ZOA) while expressing how far you can move. If you lose the ZOA, then movement integrity is diminished. Let’s find out how we can do that. Yoga Overview…Yogarview???? Whatever  I came into this course knowing piddly diddly about yoga. Which being around several yoga practitioners was a big mistake. There was a lot of Yoga terminology and posing that was discussed nonchalantly, which more than a few times had me lost. I now know how those who are not familiar with PRI feel taking a course for the first time. I only blame myself though. Make sure you are prepped when you go and at least have basic familiarity with basic yoga poses, verbiage, and tenets. There is

Read More

A Fly on the Wall of the Hruska Clinic

The Saga Continues  This post is way over due, but a lot has been going on in life. I have just moved to Arizona to start anew, and the change is bittersweet. The Midwest is all that I have known for the past 27 years. I’m leaving a lot of loved ones behind that I will miss dearly. However, getting out of the Midwest to a warmer place has always been a dream for me, and I finally got that opportunity. I also get to work at an awesome clinic alongside like-minded clinicians. One of my good friends will even be there. Plus, summer forevaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhh!!!!!! So with this transition in my life marks a good time to reflect on one of my many experiences at the Hruska Clinic. This time, I will show you how the clinic itself operates. And their operation is a beautiful thing. The General Feel You walk in the door and can immediately shift into your left hip. That’s what this place is like upon entering. With various shades of purple and tan, you just feel at ease being there. It screams parasympathetic. This build was no accident of course. Purple is a calming color, giving those at the clinic a huge home-field advantage. I bet there is also a reason why you walk left to check-in at the front desk. The clinic is an interdisciplinary dream. The staff includes 5 physical therapists, an optometrist, a dentist, and a podiatrist. This setup allows for great communication

Read More