Clinical Practice Guidelines, Periodizing Sessions, and Muscle Imbalances – Movement Debrief Episode 33

Movement Debrief Episode 33 is in the books. Here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure.

Here is the set list:

  • Do I use clinical practice guidelines and treatment-based classification system for managing patients?
  • How much time do I devote to developing specific qualities in a typical physical therapy session?
  • Where are muscle imbalances prioritized on my program design?
  • Is there validity in testing specific muscles based on work/sport specific demands?

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 7:30pm CST.

Enjoy!

Zac Cupples iTunes                

Here were the links I mentioned:

Clinical Practice Guidelines

Neck Pain Treatment-Based Classification System

Treatment-Based Classification System for Low Back Pain: Revision and Update

Practical Pain Education

How to Design a Comprehensive Rehabilitation Program

Thoughts on Manual Muscle Testing

Rocketbook

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How to Design Your Learning Program

Thanks Buddy

The other day I was texting with a friend and writer I respect dearly, Seth Oberst, and he asked me an excellent question regarding the reading process:

How do you determine what you read next though? ~Seth Oberst

I answered him then, though it felt brief and inadequate. His question inspired me to reflect on how I design my learning process.

Though I’ve mentioned my learning philosophy, it may be fruitful to delve into the details. Seth, I hope I don’t let you down. Continue reading “How to Design Your Learning Program”

The 6-Step Method to Reading the Shit Out of Books

What Were We Talking About Again?

If there is one thing I’ve struggled with over the years, it’s long term retention.

Though remembering course materials has had it’s challenges, the struggle is worse with books.

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My next strategy if this doesn’t work.

Overconsumption was part of the problem. Trying to read faster, and across multiple unrelated books caused more detriment than use. Much as our attention spans can be overstimulated by abundant information on the internet, so to can we suffer this fate with reading. There are a lot of books after all.

While narrowing my reading focus has helped quite a bit, improving my reading strategy was equally important.

I remember one summer I made it my goal to learn how to shuffle cards. We played A LOT of cards on my family vacations, and I was tired of having to use the automatic shuffler or having someone else shuffle for me at the family card game.

It was time to become a man, damnit!

I shuffled anytime I had some free time during the day; which back when I was a kid led to multiple bouts of daily shuffling.

By the end of the summer, I was unconscious with shuffling, and still am to this day.

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One might say

Frequent, quality repetitions at any task will likely lead to improvement. Learning material is no different, we must just foster an environment of multiple exposures to said material.

Here’s my latest attempt at doing so. Continue reading “The 6-Step Method to Reading the Shit Out of Books”