Foundations of Athleticism and Health with James Cerbie

To be life-proof, you need to build power, strength, endurance, hypertrophy, and move well. In this podcast with James Cerbie, we dive deep into how to blend these qualities into one unified training program.

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Clinical Practice Guidelines, Periodizing Sessions, and Muscle Imbalances – Movement Debrief Episode 33

Movement Debrief Episode 33 is in the books. Here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure. Here is the set list: Do I use clinical practice guidelines and treatment-based classification system for managing patients? How much time do I devote to developing specific qualities in a typical physical therapy session? Where are muscle imbalances prioritized on my program design? Is there validity in testing specific muscles based on work/sport specific demands? If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 7:30pm CST. Enjoy!                  Here were the links I mentioned: Clinical Practice Guidelines Neck Pain Treatment-Based Classification System Treatment-Based Classification System for Low Back Pain: Revision and Update Practical Pain Education How to Design a Comprehensive Rehabilitation Program Thoughts on Manual Muscle Testing Rocketbook Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 3 hours and 50 pages of content, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies:   Clinical Practice Guidelines Periodizing Sessions Muscle Imbalances

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Practical Basketball Conditioning

Hey party people. Just when you thought I was done guest posting, I got another spot on my guy Mike Robertson’s website. This post was a follow-up to the basketball conditioning mistakes post I did last week. If conditioning mistakes are the disease, this post is the cure. In this post, I discussed the following topics: What the energy system demands are in basketball The three conditioning qualities a basketball player must possess to be successful The high/low method and more You can check out the blog here, or at the big ol’ link below. If you want some of MR’s best energy systems posts, I’d check these bad boys out: You NEED Long Duration, Low Intensity Cardio 6 Tips for Writing Better Conditioning Programs 5 More Thoughts on Energy Systems Development Real Talk About Aerobic Training for Athletes Enjoy. Practical Basketball Conditioning

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How to Design a Comprehensive Rehab Program

Just when I thought I was out, the clinic pulls me back in. Though I’m glad to be back. There’s just a different vibe, different pace, and ever-constant variety of challenges that being in the clinic simply provides. This has been especially true working in a rural area. You see a much wider variety, which challenges you to broaden your skillset. I’m amazed at how much working in the NBA has changed the way I approach the clinic. Previously, I was all about getting people in and out of the door as quickly as possible; and with very few visits. I would cut them down to once a week or every other week damn-near immediately, and try to hit that three to five visit sweet spot. This strategy no doubt worked, and people got better, but I had noticed I’d get repeat customers. Maybe it wasn’t the area that was initially hurting them, but they still were having trouble creep up. Or maybe it was the same pain, just taking much more activity to elicit the sensation. It became clear that I was skipping steps to try and get my visit number low, when in reality I was doing a disservice to my patients. This was the equivalent of fast food PT—give them the protein, carbohydrates, and fats, forget about the vitamins and minerals. Was getting someone out the door in 3 visits for me or for them? The younger, big ass ego me, wanted to known as the guy

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Course Notes: The Val Nasedkin Seminar

A Long Lost Love  Strength and conditioning is a guilty pleasure of mine. One I love to indulge in from time to time. There is something about the training process that excites me. So when I heard Val Nasedkin was speaking in the US, I jumped on the opportunity. Val is the brilliant mind behind the Omegawave, a device which I have been experimenting with in my own training and hoped to learn more about. I left with a greater appreciation not only for what Val’s system intends to do, but the way he coaches and programs. If you get a chance to hear Val or Roman Fomin speak, take up the opportunity. These guys are both revolutionaries in their respective fields. Here were a few of the big takeaways.   Ze Goal Val created the Omegawave to provide a framework and determine appropriate timing for our current performance methodologies. Most training and rehabilitation processes are chosen based on results. focusing here, however, neglects individual responses to inputs. Great results can come at a great cost to an individual. If biological cost of training can be measured, there is potential to maximize an individual’s health, long term potential, and work capacity, while still achieving desired results.

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