Seth Oberst’s Stress, Movement, and Pain Course Review

Do you work with people who are stressed? Dumb question, right? Who isn’t stressed today? In fact, stress levels are probably at an all time high, and if you’ve read Robert Sapolsky’s work, is likely responsible for most of the conditions and maladies we face today. The question we must ask though is what role a movement professional has in helping someone mitigate stress? After attending Seth Oberst’s Stress, Pain, and Movement seminar, I think we now have an answer. Now I’ve taken a lot of courses in my day, and much of what I learned is the same poop, repackaged as different poop. That’s not to say that new perspectives aren’t useful, but most are looking at the same thing. Seth’s is the first class that I’ve been to in a hot minute where I had that feeling of “whoa, now this is different.” His approach looks at the struggles our patients and clients deal with through a very unique lens. To me, this course is the gold standard for learning just how problematic stress is for our patients, and what to do about it. Not only will you get an incredibly in-depth look at stress, autonomics, the nervous system, pain, and so much more, but you’ll learn some excellent methods to aid your clients in mitigating stress. I cannot recommend learning from Seth highly enough. If you want to attend, you can sign up here. While I won’t go into the great detail that Seth does on the brain,

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Interview by The Manual Therapist

Dear team,   Quick post today, but I had the pleasure and honor of being interviewed by my man Erson Religioso of The Manual Therapist fame.   You can check the interview here http://www.themanualtherapist.com/2013/12/interview-with-zac-cupples.html  

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Online Consult with The Manual Therapist

The Rundown My good friend Erson Religioso of The Manual Therapist fame recently contacted me to do a consult for some back/leg trouble he has been having. It was a very interesting eval for many reasons. Online consults are a completely different animal, as you cannot do any hands-on testing. Moreover, when you have a therapist who is initiated into pain neuroscience, you don’t have to go so much the Explain Pain route 🙂 So with this eval, we looked at things a lot through a PRI lens, and were able to get him strategies to modulate his pain experience. The eval runs a smidge over 1 hour, so here are some vids with a quick rundown. Subjective – Getting paresthesia down the R LE that began 2 weeks ago after a car ride…has peripheralized since initial event. – Symptoms are aggravated with static sitting or standing…onset ranging from seconds to minutes. – Has tried loading/unloading MDT strategies, neurodynamics, Mulligan techniques, IASTM, compression wrapping, etc…all to no avail. Objective (major findings) – Limited B Apley’s scratch (1 per FMS scoring) – Negative slump and ASLR – Painful lumbar motions of extension, right rotation and sidebend. R sidebend was limited. – Negative thomas test on left, positive on right – Slight limitations in active seated hip IR B, R>L. – Adduction lift scores 1/5 B. My Impression If I were to classify Erson, it seems his symptoms would seems to be more dominant as peripheral nociceptive ischemic and central sensitivity (he stated he has

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Why Everything Works (and Doesn’t Work)

A Great Place to Be I was recently at my home away from home, IFAST. Every time I go here the following occurs: I have an amazing time with amazing people. I learn a ton and realize how little I really know. Prolific discussions are had. I end up purchasing WAY too many books as soon as I get home. As many of you know, Bill Hartman and I appreciate a PRI philosophy. When I go to IFAST, we inevitably experiment with many different things. This weekend, Bill and I were playing with how many different ways we could achieve full right shoulder internal rotation on my good friend Lance and the lovely IFAST intern Liz. Here was everything that gave these people full motion. Soft tissue mobilization to the infraspinatus. Manually assisted breathing. Tickling the right side of the face. Tapping the left hamstring. Smacking the right glute max (yes, I spanked someone). Having someone think about contracting their right glute max as hard as possible. Having someone watch me breathe with a left sidebend. Reflex locomotion. Now of course, that does not mean you should be spanking your patients and clients with shoulder issues (but if you do make sure it is the right glute), but we have to ask why did all of these different techniques–even the weird ones– achieve the same outcome we wanted? Why Things Work Joseph Brence, a gentleman whose material I enjoy, recently posted a blog showing several different techniques and polling his

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