Speeches, Hip Openers, and PRI vs DNS – Movement Debrief Episode 32

Movement Debrief Episode 32 is in the books. Here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure. Here is the set list: How do I organize a talk or course? How do I get speaking engagements? Should we be performing hip openers? How do I integrate PRI and DNS into rehab and performance? Is there a dichotomy between PRI and DNS? Why we need to transcend commercial models What things I am learning now Why a clamshell won’t destroy Usain Bolt   If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 7:30pm CST. Enjoy!                    Here were the links I mentioned: Explain Pain Supercharged Slideology Sign up for my newsletter to access my Practical Pain Education and Respiration Revisited talk Ben Fergus guest post on squatting Effect of Changes in Pelvic Tilt on Range of Motion to Impingement and Radiographic Parameters of Acetabular Morphologic Characteristics An Anatomic Investigation of the Obers Test Barking Up the Wrong Tree: The Surprising Science Behind Why Everything You Know About Success Is (Mostly) Wrong  Oxygen Advantage Enhancing Life Method Strength Andy Mccloy  Trevor LaSarre Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get nearly 3 hours and 50 pages of content, a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies:   Speeches Hip Openers PRI vs DNS

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Chapter 2.1: Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Developmental Kinesiology: Breathing Stereotypes and Postural Locomotion Function

This is a chapter 2.1 summary of “Recognizing and Treating Breathing Disorders” by Leon Chaitow. You’re Writing About DNS???!!??! Yes, I am. Pavel Kolar and crew actually contributed to quite a few chapters in this edition, and this one here was overall very well written. Believe it or not, it even had quite a few citations! Why they don’t cite many references in their classes is beyond me, but that’s another soapbox for another day. Onward to a rock-solid chapter. Developmental Diaphragm En utero, the diaphragm’s origin begins in the cervical region, which could possibly have been an extension of the rectus abdominis muscle.  As development progresses, the diaphragm caudally descends and tilts forward. When the child is between 4-6 months old, the diaphragm reaches its final position. Throughout this period, the diaphragm initially is used for respiratory function only. As we progress through the neonatal period (28 days), we see the diaphragm progress postural and sphincter function. The diaphragm is integral for developing requisite stability to move. Achieving movement involves co-activation of the diaphragm, abdominal, back, and pelvic muscles. This connectivity assimilates breathing, posture, and movement. If this system develops properly, we see the highest potential for motor control. The largest developmental changes in this system occur at 3 months. Here we see the cervical and thoracic spine straighten and costal breathing initiate. 4.5 months show extremity function differentiation, indicating a stable axial skeleton to which movement may occur. Further progression occurs at 6 months. Here costal breathing is

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Advanced Integration Day 3: Thoracic-Scapula Integration

Day 3 was all thorax and scapula. Here we go! For day 1, click here For day 2, click here A Philosophical Ron Intro Since the day began talking thoracic-scapula, Ron started us off by showing all the T-S connections in the body. Temporal——-sphenoid Thoracic———sternum Thoracic———scapula Tri-os coxae—-Sacrum You will notice that the thorax is very connected to many of these areas. Therefore,  it is very important to control this area early on; especially if one’s problem is in the cervical spine. The “pattern” dictates the thorax governing the cervical spine because the neck follows suit with the rotated left thoracic spine. Thus, if we restore position to the thorax, oftentimes neck position will clear up. From here, my man James Anderson was introduced, and we started off the discussion with a bang. Brain, Brain, and a Little More Brain The first hour was spent talking about a subject much needing discussion: PRI’s cortical foundation. James really hammered the fact that our brains are what drive us to the right. None of the previous mentioned material matters. Zones don’t matter, left AFIR, right shoulder internal rotation, nothing, if you can’t get the brain to change out of a left hemispheric dominance. How do we do this? Per James, let’s get a zone of apposition (ZOA) in a right lateralized pattern.   Say what? All the talk you have been hearing involves getting out of this right-sided dominance. But think of PRI activity in this fashion. We are most comfortable with performing right-sided activities. So why not use graded exposure to slowly

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Course Notes: DNS C

It was a Long Week After an incredibly long 5 days, I finally got the chance to assimilate what I learned from the Prague folks at the C level DNS course. Despite coming out with a few good exercise tweaks, I left disappointed. I will need some extreme convincing to continue on with their course work. A man I respect a lot, Charlie Weingroff, likes asking a question regarding interventions: “Can your treatments beat my tests?” With that in mind, I looked at DNS’s capability to beat my tests, which are predominately making changes to PRI objective measures. The answer: Mostly no. I felt a lot of activity with many of the exercises, but if we cannot make measurable changes, then the intervention is not effective. And with the DNS “objective” measures, positive change is attributed visually only. I don’t care how good your eyes are, you can never know if a joint achieves maximal bony congruency by just watching movement. Granted, I did get a few things that I will use regularly. But to get 4 or 5 takeaways for a $1000 price-tag, I feel there are better ways to spend money. Like on shawarma and stuff. Here are my likes and dislikes. Days 1 & 2 aka DNS A & B The first two days were predominately review of the A and B courses; looking over developmental positions and reflex locomotion. It was nice to review old concepts, but does it really have to take two days to

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Course Notes: DNS Summit

Why? In my short time out I have gotten heavily into the influence that breathing has on the nervous system. Obviously PRI has been my favorite explanation thus far, but the DNS approach had me intrigued. The summit is the first of two DNS courses that I took this past week. This summit was the first of its kind, and was an amalgamation of many different speakers. Unfortunately, this summit was mostly review and wrought with little innovation. Here are some of the big points I got from a few of the speakers. “Developmental Kinesiology: Three Levels of Motor Control in Assessment and Treatment of the Motor System” by Dr. Alena Kobesova There are three levels of development: spinal, subcortical, and cortical Spinal level of motor control is primitive reflexes; subcortical motor control is core stability; cortical motor control includes individual patterns. DNS suggests inhibiting primitive reflexes instead of facilitating them for function. Core stabilization occurs first at 4.5 months development, then locomotion follows. All movement patterns are either ipsilateral or contralateral. The former develops in supine, and the latter in prone. “DNS Among Elite Athletes – MLB” by PJ Mainville Didn’t get much out of this one except PJ dancing around PRI 🙂 Recommended using theratube around the wrist so you can perform hand movements with PNF patterns as such.  “DNS in Gynecological and Obstetrics Disorders” by Martina Jezkova When in quadruped, the pelvic floor does not create a base for the trunk and had no postural function. The

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DNS B Course Notes

Whew, I recently finished (and still trying to process) the B level DNS course from the folks at The Prague School. Instructors were Martina Jeszkova and Dr. David Jeurhing. There were a lot of things covered during this 4 day course and I definitely learned a few things. Here are the highlights. Developmental Principles The focal point of DNS is the concept of joint centration, a static and dynamic maximal joint surface approximation.  When joint surfaces achieve optimal bony congruency, the muscles surrounding the joint achieve optimal activation and highest mechanical advantage.  The reverse is also true. If muscles coactivate properly, then joint centration occurs. Conversely, if optimal joint centration is not achieved then muscle imbalances occur. The reverse is also true. This change becomes very problematic, as decentration at one joint effects centration at all the other joints. This may lead to decreased performance at best and at worst increased wear on joint surfaces. Take lower crossed syndrome (or open scissors if you are a DNS fan) for example. Let’s say we had a problem with our lower back. In order to cope with this trouble, we increase lumbar lordosis and decentrate the lumbar spine. See how it affects the surrounding structures. The pelvis anteriorly tilts, which affects length tension relationships to glutes, hamstrings, and hip flexors. Thoracic kyphosis increases as well, affecting the shoulder girdle and cervical muscles. Basically, play with one body region or joint position and see how it affects the others, and you can develop

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