Challenges of Home Exercise Execution, Do You Really Have Sagittal Plane? and PT in 25 Years – Movement Debrief Episode 17

Just in case you missed last night’s Movement Debrief Episode 17, here is a copy of the video and audio for your listening pleasure. Here’s what we talked about: What makes getting patients to do their home exercises challenging. Strategies I implement to increase adherence. How I determine when sagittal plane control is adequate. What I think PT will be like 25 years from now. Major thanks to Dani Overcash, an awesome writer in her own right, for asking a really great question. If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Youtube. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST. Enjoy.   Subscribe to the debrief on Itunes Join my mentorship program, get a movement consultation, or let me design an online fitness program for you. Here’s a signup for my newsletter to get a free acute:chronic workload calculator, basketball conditioning program, podcasts, and weekend learning goodies: Challenges of Home Exercise Execution Do You Really Have Sagittal Plane? PT in 25 Years  

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How to Design a Comprehensive Rehab Program

Just when I thought I was out, the clinic pulls me back in. Though I’m glad to be back. There’s just a different vibe, different pace, and ever-constant variety of challenges that being in the clinic simply provides. This has been especially true working in a rural area. You see a much wider variety, which challenges you to broaden your skillset. I’m amazed at how much working in the NBA has changed the way I approach the clinic. Previously, I was all about getting people in and out of the door as quickly as possible; and with very few visits. I would cut them down to once a week or every other week damn-near immediately, and try to hit that three to five visit sweet spot. This strategy no doubt worked, and people got better, but I had noticed I’d get repeat customers. Maybe it wasn’t the area that was initially hurting them, but they still were having trouble creep up. Or maybe it was the same pain, just taking much more activity to elicit the sensation. It became clear that I was skipping steps to try and get my visit number low, when in reality I was doing a disservice to my patients. This was the equivalent of fast food PT—give them the protein, carbohydrates, and fats, forget about the vitamins and minerals. Was getting someone out the door in 3 visits for me or for them? The younger, big ass ego me, wanted to known as the guy

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