Chapter 5: Diagnosis with Neurodynamic Tests

This is a Chapter 5 summary of “Clinical Neurodynamics” by Michael Shacklock. Neurodynamic Tests In neurodynamic tests, there are two movement types: 1)      Sensitizing: Increase force on neural structures. 2)      Differentiating: Emphasizing nervous system by moving the neural structure as opposed to musculoskeletal tissue. The reason why sensitizers are not considered differentiating structures is because they also move musculoskeletal structures. Examples of sensitizing movements include: Cervical or lumbar spine contralateral lateral flexion. Scapular depression Humeroglenoid (HG) horizontal extension HG external rotation Hip internal rotation Hip adduction Interpreting The ability to interpret neurodynamic findings is crucial when determining the nervous system’s involvement.  Findings such as asymmetry, symptoms, and increased sensitivity are all important. But to implicate neurodynamics, structural differentiation ought to be performed. Just because there is a positive test does not mean that it is relevant to the patient’s complaints. There are several ways to classify findings: Negative structural differentiation: Implicates musculoskeletal response. Positive structural differentiation: Implicates neurodynamic response. Neurodynamic responses can have different interpretations: Normal: Fits normal responses per literature. Abnormal: Differ from normal responses. Can be broken down further into… Overt abnormal responses: Symptoms reproduction. Covert abnormal response: No symptoms, but may have other subtle findings such as asymmetry, abnormal location, and/or different resistance. From here, one must determine if the findings are relevant or irrelevant to the condition in question. You may also come across subclinical findings, in which the neurodynamic test is related to a minor problem that may become major at some point.

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The Sensitive Nervous System Chapter XI: Neurodynamic Testing for the Spine and Lower Limb

This is a summary of Chapter XI of “The Sensitive Nervous System” by David Butler. Intro For today’s chapter, I have decided that the best way to learn these tests is to show you. I will write in any pertinent details you need for a good test performance. The Straight Leg Raise (SLR) SLR hacks. Add sensitizers (dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, etc) to determine nervous system involvement. Add cervical flexion or visual input to enhance responses. Be mindful of symptoms before and after pain responses. If this test is positive post-operation, it will likely be inflammatory in nature. You can preload the system further with cervical flexion or sidebending the trunk away from the test side. Here are some other ways to perform the SLR with sensitizers first. (I apologize for the way the camera shot in advance). For tibial nerve-bias. For fibular nerve bias. For sural nerve bias. Passive Neck Flexion (PNF) Here is how to perform the test. PNF Hacks. Add SLR to further bias the test. Be mindful of Lhermitte’s sign, which is an electric shock down the arms or spine. This is a must-refer sign as there is potential spinal cord damage. Slump Test Here is how to perform the slump. Slump Knee Bend In the book itself, Butler uses the prone knee bend as his base test. However, NOI does not teach this motion as much and now favors the slump knee bend. This movement allows for much more differentiation to be had. And the saphenous nerve

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The Sensitive Nervous System Chapter X: Neurodynamic Tests in the Clinic

 This is a summary of Chapter X of “The Sensitive Nervous System” by David Butler. The Tests When assessing neurodynamics, there is a general system that is used including the following tests: Passive neck flexion (PNF). Straight leg raise (SLR). Prone knee bend (PKB). Slump. 4 different upper limb neurodynamic tests (ULNT). I will demonstrate these tests for you in later chapters. Many clinicians when discussing the lower extremity-biased tests deem that maybe only one or two of the tests need to be performed, however this assertion is erroneous. Slump, SLR, and PNF all need to be tested as a cluster. The reason being is that the clinical responses may often differ. This difference is especially noticeable when comparing the SLR and the slump. These two are not equal tests for the following reasons: Components are performed in a different order. Spine position is different. Patients may be more familiar with the SLR, therefore give more familiar responses. The patient is in control during the slump, not in the SLR. The slump is more provocative. Rules of Thumb When testing neurodynamics, here are the following guidelines: 1)      Active before passive. 2)      Differentiate structures – add/subtract other movements to see if symptoms can change. 3)      Document the test order. Positive Test The positive testing here is a little dated based on what Butler’s group and the research says as of right now. Based on what I have learned from Adriaan Louw, having any of the following is what constitutes a positive

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