Return to Play after a 5th Metatarsal Fracture – Case Report

I was recently featured on my buddy Scott Gray’s podcast,  a great clinician in the Florida area who I have a lot of respect for. Before we dive into the podcast, let me tell you a bit about why I like this guy so much. It’s not just because he is a part of the IFAST family. I’ve been going back to the basics as of late, reviewing concepts such as tissue pathology, anatomy, surgical procedures, and the like. If there is anyone who has the fundamentals down savagely well, it is Scott Gray. He put out an Ebook called “The Physical Examination Blueprint”, which you can download by subscribing to his newsletter. Here he details all the essentials on screening your patients. To me, the most important aspect of patient care is knowing who you can and cannot treat. Stratifying your patients based on who needs to be referred out, and who you can help is essential to providing the best care. Quite simply, there are few better resources out there that outline how to do this than Scott’s ebook. In it, he delves into what relevant questions to ask, tests to perform, and establishing a relevant diagnosis. Often underlooked, yet exceptionally important components of the clinical examination. Again, I cannot recommend Scott’s ebook and site enough. It’s a great resource for many things PT, including many of his eclectic and unique manual therapy techniques. Definitely check this guy out. Rehabbing a 5th Metatarsal Fracture to High Level Basketball In

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Post 100: Sexifying Upper Quadrant Post-Op

I Wrote a Lot It’s interesting to think how much this blog has changed since I started writing in February 2013. We’ve gone from cliff notes of books, to cliff notes of courses, to the occasional self-musing.   While I still plan on reviewing and assimilating courses I take, my hope is to expand and reflect upon whatever is in my brain a smidge more. It makes sense to start this trend with post 100. And today, postoperative care is piquing my interest. Yes, post-op intervention is a guilty pleasure of mine. And it’s not because it’s easy. Far from easy. Post op treatment gives you a license to create under various constraints. Meaning you have to dig a little deeper to achieve desired goals. I think it can be way sexier, and effective, than your typical post-op protocol BS. So let’s create some successful post-op fun. The First Constraint Before we even talk about specific patients, we have to first look at the largest constraint yet: available tools. At my current digs, I don’t have much of anything in terms of heavy weights. So here is what I have at my disposal that I can implement: 1-on-1 care for 60 minutes Kettlebells: 10, 15, 25 pounds Therabands and theratubes of various sizes Cook bands of various resistances PRI trial orthotics (mouth splints, arch supports, reading glasses, yada) Steps Tape IPAD 3D stretch cage (aka very expensive equipment to tie therabands to) Access to higher level brain centers Heart of

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