Why I Am Expanding My Maxilla at 33 Years Old

When getting a tongue tie release isn’t enough Placing your tongue on the roof of your mouth is important for increasing upper airway space, promoting nasal breathing, and positively affecting neck dynamics. These were a few reasons why I pursued a tongue tie release surgery. Increasing my tongue range of motion would allow me to more easily attain this posture, and hopefully feel a litany of positive effects. But that’s assuming one critical piece… Is there enough room for your tongue to sit on the roof of the mouth? That, folks, was the issue I had, and why the surgery was not enough. Here were my next steps.

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The Road to an Alternating and Reciprocal Warrior: You down with ENT?

This spans an entire treatment over a year’s time. Here’s part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4   “Yeah you know me.” ~ Naughty By Nature  You know how sometimes when you are treating someone that individual eventually reveals fairly important information that he or she forgot about. Yeah that was totally me. I’ve always had a stuffy nose as far back as I can remember; especially in the winter. The only time breathing felt incredibly easy was when I was eating paleo in college. I have progressively been losing my sense of smell as well. Must be old age right? When I spoke with Lori Thomsen about my recent experience, she mentioned at Pelvis that attaining neutrality in certain areas but not others could lead to a “pressure cooker” phenomenon. For example, if I have someone with a neutral neck and thorax, lower extremity symptoms may possibly be more common. In my case, I had a neutral pelvis at the time my wisdom teeth were pulled. Pull out wisdom teeth and my nasal airway goes crazy. Guess where the pressure went? It was time to see an ENT. ENT Begins After viewing my CT scan and airway, my ENT concluded I have patho-scoliosis. More specifically, airway scoliosis. He found a deviated septum and some enlarged turbinates. These two factors could have a large impact on my breathing capabilities. To me this made a lot of sense. If you read this article, a nostril will drive air to the ipsilateral lung.

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