The Sensitive Nervous System Chapter IX: Manual Assessment of Nerve Conduction

This is a summary of Chapter IX of “The Sensitive Nervous System” by David Butler. The Value The neurological exam is an excellent way to sample the patient’s nervous system. When looking at the neurological system, we must realize that testing does not reflect a tissue injury alone. It demonstrates the neurological pathway’s response. There is no such thing as a focal lesion in the nervous system. We must also understand that the exam is a very small component of a further comprehensive assessment, providing moderate diagnostic value at best. Sensitivity for a screen like this is inherently poor, meaning this examination cannot rule out nervous system pathology or involvement. Sensory Examination If we are going to walk the neurological walk, we first need to talk the neurological talk. Here are some important definitions. Allodynia: Pain from a non-painful stimulus. Hyperalgesia: Increased response to a painful stimulus. Analgesia: No pain from a painful stimulus. Hyperpathia: Abnormal pain reaction to a repetitive stimulus. Hypoalgesia: Decreased response to a painful stimulus. Hypoesthesia: Decreased sensitivity to a stimulus. Hyperesthesia: Increased sensitivity to a stimulus. Dysesthesia: Unpleasant, but not painful response to a stimulus. First, we will take a look at dermatomes. Now depending on who you talk to, dermatomal levels will be different. Moreover, many people have anatomically variant dermatomes, and often times these can fluctuate throughout the day. There are however, some signature zones that are fairly consistent throughout the literature. There are several different sensations that need to be tested. Make

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Explain Pain Section 1: Intro to Pain

This is a summary of the first section of the book “Explain Pain” by David Butler and Lorimer Moseley. Intro The major premise of this book is that pain is normal. It is the way that your brain judges a situation as threatening. Even if there are problems in the body, pain will not occur if your brain thinks you are not in danger. Explaining pain can reduce the threat value and improve pain management. And the good thing about explaining pain? Research shows that it can be an easily understood concept. Pain is Normal Pain from bites, postures, sprains, and other everyday activities are more often than not changes in the tissues that the brain perceives as threatening. This system is very handy, as often it keeps us from making the same mistake twice. I personally akin this to patients as recognizing a certain smell and that smell reminding you of something. Pain is often the reminder of previous injuries. Pain becomes problematic when it becomes chronic. This pain is often the result of the brain concluding that for some reason, often a subconscious one, that the person is threatened and in danger. The trick is finding out why. Pain Stories Stories are some of the best ways to relate pain to patients. There are many cases when you hear soldiers sustaining major injuries yet charging further into battle. On the flipside, take a look at paper cuts. The damage is very miniscule; however, the pain levels are huge.

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Course Notes: The Eclectic Approach to Upper Quarter Evaluation and Treatment

I recently attended this course with my man Erson Religioso III. It was great connecting with him and learning his approach. Check out his stuff on www.themanualtherapist.com Overall, I thought it was an excellent course and definitely opened my mind to an approach (i.e. McKenzie) that I was not a huge fan of. I highly recommend taking one of his courses. Here were some of the pearls I got from his course. My thoughts will be italicized. On Assessments “If you don’t have a system, you are lost in an evaluation.” The SFMA reasons why people get hurt. #1 cause – previous injury. Asymmetry of quality and quantity. Motor control. Stupidity. Just because you clear something once doesn’t mean it has been cleared forever. If one has knee pain and decreased ankle dorsiflexion, check tibial internal rotation. On Education “Never tell people they are train wrecks.” This goes back to reducing the threat response and explaining pain. We want to maximize the placebo effect. On Neuroscience Nerves move like an arm in a sleeve. A tight sleeve wears down myelin which is replaced with ion channels. This is why nerves become sensitive. Also why you must treat the entire nerve container. Abnormal impulse generating site (AIGS) These fire both ways. Not normally at the sight of symptoms. If symptoms are episodic, then it is not centrally maintained. If you skin your knee 10 times in 10 years, you don’t say I have a chronic skinned-knee problem. On Surgery “Less than 1%

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