The 3 Biggest Basketball Conditioning Mistakes

Hey party people.

In case you missed it, I did a guest spot on my guy Mike Robertson’s website.

Mike has been a cat I’ve known for many years now, and has (and still does) profoundly influenced the way I coach.

His posts on deadlifting, bench pressing, and on long duration low intensity cardio are simply some of the best things you’ll find on the internet. Please support this cat.

In this post, I discussed the following topics:

  • Why general preparation is no substitute for specific preparation
  • Why basketball ought to be practiced according to energy system demands
  • What those energy system demands are
  • How to use acute:chronic workload to safely progress conditioning

You can check out the blog here, or at the big ol’ link below.

Enjoy.

The 3 Biggest Basketball Conditioning Mistakes

Death of Vertical Tibia, Usain Bolt, Complex Patients, and More – Movement Debrief Episode 13

Movement Debrief Episode 13 yesterday involved quite a few rants. Must’ve been the ketones talking.

Here’s what we talked about:

  • Restoring sensation with my patient with low back pain
  • Why it’s okay to have an angled tibia during squatting
  • Would any intervention help/hurt Usain Bolt?
  • The complexity of Usain Bolt
  • Struggling with a complex patient
  • Dealing with uncertainty
  • Embracing the struggle

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. (occasionally) They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

Here were some of the links I mentioned in this Debrief.

How to Deadlift – A Movement Deep Dive

Squatting Bar Reach – A Movement Deep Dive

The Sensitive Nervous System – Read my book notes here

Clinical Neurodynamics- Read my book notes here

A Study of Neurodynamics: The Body’s Living Alarm

Mobilisation of the Neuroimmune System – Read the course notes here

Explain Pain– Read the course notes here

Extreme Ownership

The Obstacle is the Way

Ego is the Enemy

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

July 2017 in Review

Every week, my newsletter subscribers get links to some of the goodies that I’ve come across on the internets.

Here were the goodies that my peeps got their learn on from this past July.

If you want to get a copy of my weekend learning goodies every Friday, fill out the form below.  That way you can brag to all your friends about the cool things you’ve learned over the weekend.

Biggest Lesson of the Month

Maximize proximal before spending time distal. I’ve just seen too many patients where we applied some type of axial intervention, which led to profound changes distally. Position governs all. Thank you for making me realize this daddy-o.

Quote of the Month

Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly. ~Robert Kennedy

Rehabilitation

Blog: What is the Best Test to Discern an ACL Tear?

My boy Scott Gray put together a rock solid post on diagnosing an ACL tear. I’ve been very big as of late on filling the differential diagnosis hole in my game, and this one was beyond helpful. I wish I had heard of the lever test last year when I had a guy pop his ACL in-game.

Blog: The Quadruped Rockback Test: RIP

My buddy Doug Kechijian ever so succinctly puts this dated test to rest. There is so much more that goes into deciding squat depth than can be accurately accounted for with this test.

never question a guy with a loaded gun.

Performance

Research: The effects of two different recovery postures during high intensity interval training

I’m still making my way through this beast. It’s a thesis, but the references and explanations of the science behind breathing, position, and recovery is outstanding. Not only that, but changing your recovery position has had a profound effect on improving my clients’ conditioning.

Video: Lateral Lunge Quick Hit

This was a promo I put out for my 5th Metatarsal RTP podcast. It’s a nice little cue to drive greater frontal plane activity on the non-working leg.

Research: The athlete monitoring cycle: a practical guide to interpreting and applying training monitoring data

So proud of my guy Eric Oetter, who put this incredibly practical guide to load management together with the brilliant Tim Gabbett. EO is doing phenomenal things with the Grizzlies, and this provides a small insight into his process.

Nutrition

Podcast: Does Meat Consumption Cause Cancer? 

Short answer – It depends. I have a coworker who I discuss with the problems of this argument. I’m an avid meat eater because gainzzz, and it turns out that makes the difference. If you aren’t listening to Ronda Patrick by the way, you’re welcome.

Yeah, I’m a meat eater #dealwithit

Podcast: How to Tell if You Have a Leaky Gut

Chris Kresser is a cat I’ve been really getting into as of late. I think there are a lot of cool things within functional medicine, and this guy is one of the most evidenced-based out there.

I think the gut microbiome is a vastly underappreciated area to intervene on. But how do you know if you have a problem? CK tells you how to find out.

Video/podcast: George Brooks, Ph.D on Lactate

This Rhonda Patrick joint talks about all the wonderful things lactate does for us. This molecule always gets a bad rap, but did you know in brain injuries (concussions, TBIs, etc), it’s one of the few substrates that is capable of providing our brain fuel? This was a very fascinating hour in which I learned a great deal.

Research: Fasting, Circadian Rhythms, and Time-Restricted Feeding in Healthy Lifespan

Supplemental Podcast: Satchin Panda Interview

What if I told you that there was a way you could keep eating what you are eating yet still lose fat and gain muscle. Would you do it?

If so, then this is your study. By simply restricting the eating window to 9-12 hours in mice, and having them eat earlier in their day, these bad boys lost some major weight. He did a similar study in humans as well. He goes into detail about this and more. Both the paper and the podcast are quite interesting

Sleep

Video/Podcast: Dan Pardi on Sleep

I’ve been on a little Rhonda Patrick (#bae) kick as of late. In this interview, Dan Pardi talks about all things sleep, circadian rhythms, and more. If you can maximize sleep duration, intensity, and timing, you are winning at life. Never thought of sleep described in this manner.

Quick Hit: Tips for a Better Sleep Environment

Here are some of my keys to creating that ideal sleep environment. There might be a few in here that you didn’t think about. What are your keys?

Finance

Book: The Four Hour Work Week 

An oldie, but a goodie. I’m taking my time with this one because it’s a big book and filled with so many practical applications. This book inspired me to check my email, and respond, less frequently. He’s given me so many ideas on streamlining my life. You’ll love the tips he has for elimination and automation. Incredibly practical.

Blog: Student Loans? What Student Loans? 

Given that I’m pretty green at being a PT mercenary, this website has been gold for me. If this doesn’t inspire you to consider travel PT, nothing will. The money is real, and it seriously feels like I’m on vacation all the time.

Me on the left by the time my student loans are paid off

Book: Roger Dawson’s Secrets of Power Negotiating

I recently had to prepare for a salary negotiation, and just reading a few chapters from this book made the process go exceedingly better than I anticipated. Negotiating, like many things, is a skill. This book will teach you the fundamentals to a skill that will benefit so many aspects of your life.

Miscellaneous

Music: “Handshakes with Snakes” by Apathy (NSFW, and likely offensive to most everyone)

As y’all probably know, I am a major hip hop head. Like, pretty much all that I listen to. I found this cat on Spotify while at the gym, and was blown away. Has fire lyrics over insane samples. Listen to the joint called “Moses” which features Twista and Bun B. Un…be…lievable

Current Book: What If

I’ve lately been trying to read something a bit less technical right before bed to help me fall asleep (which has been working well btw). First book I chose was this gem by the creator of XKCD, Randall Munroe. He basically goes through and answers ridiculous questions in the most scientific manner possible. It’s a brilliant combination of interesting and funny.

My favorite so far? “What would happen if you had a mole of moles?” #deep

Photo credits

Air National Guard

Karim benzeoona

DonkeyHotey

 

A Conversation on Learning with Lance Goyke and Jason Bryne

I recorded a really good conversation with two good buddies of mine, Lance Goyke and Jason Bryne.

Lance is a strength coach, photographer, student, and writer. He runs the show at IFAST University, coaches at IFAST, and runs his own excellent blog and Youtube channel. He is also a dear friend of mine, one of the first people I met when I interned with Bill Hartman at IFAST.

Jason is an Athletic Trainer at Brandeis University and with the Boston Cannons. He is an avid learner, tinkerer, and phenomenal human being. I truly admire his ability to connect with others, his humility, and comfort with learning from failures. Check him out on Twitter or email him at jbyrneatc@gmail.com

We went off the top of the dome on this one, as there was no agenda. I was just hoping to help better all of our learning processes.

We got that…and then some!

Here were some of the topics we covered:

  • Designing a learning process
  • Test-Retest
  • Failure
  • Being comfortable being uncomfortable
  • Connecting with others
  • How to learn
  • Study habits
  • and more

If video isn’t your thing, I have a transcript of our conversation below.

You can also download the audio version of this talk if you’d like by subscribing to my newsletter.

Without further adieu, here is the conversation

Continue reading “A Conversation on Learning with Lance Goyke and Jason Bryne”

Trial and Error, Triplanar Movement, Networking, and Mentors – Movement Debrief Episode 11

Did you miss yesterday’s Movement Debrief? We had a lot of fun. The first time I went on facebook, twitter, and Instagram simultaneously.

This debrief was a bit different, as it didn’t involve as much reflection on my patient care, but more on the wonderful continuing education weekend I had.

I got to spend time with all my friends learning about a lot of different things. And it led to some great reflections.

Here’s what I talked about:

  1. Why trial and error is important
  2. Being outcome-focused
  3. How triplanar movement impacts single plane movements
  4. Why having a good network is important
  5. Keys the networking
  6. The importance of mentors

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

Lat Stretch Arm Position, Exercise Programming, and Staying Neutral? – Movement Debrief Episode 10

Episode 10 of the Movement Debrief, we went straight up q&a from readers.

It was a lot of fun and I got a lot of great question from people.

Here was what we discussed:

  1. Should the arm be in internal or external rotation when stretching the lats?
  2. If general exercise works, why should we incorporate specific exercises?
  3. Why coaching exercises well is of utmost importance
  4. Is staying neutral in a good joint position important?

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

Workers’ Compensation, Dealing with Late Patients, Fall Prevention, & More – Movement Debrief Episode 9

Episode 9 was a long one, and I’m so sad if you missed it live.

Here were some of the topics:

  1. The necessary organizational fix to worker’s compensation
  2. Ways physical therapists can have patients simulate work
  3. Targeting educational-specific impairments
  4. The need to expand scope or collaborate to help clients thrive
  5. How to deal with patients who are always late and don’t do their exercises
  6. Working on getting up off the ground after a fall

If you want to watch these live, add me on Facebook or Instagram. They air every Wednesday at 8:30pm CST.

Enjoy.

Return to Play after a 5th Metatarsal Fracture – Case Report

I was recently featured on my buddy Scott Gray’s podcast,  a great clinician in the Florida area who I have a lot of respect for.

Before we dive into the podcast, let me tell you a bit about why I like this guy so much.

It’s not just because he is a part of the IFAST family.

I’ve been going back to the basics as of late, reviewing concepts such as tissue pathology, anatomy, surgical procedures, and the like.

If there is anyone who has the fundamentals down savagely well, it is Scott Gray.

He put out an Ebook called “The Physical Examination Blueprint”, which you can download by subscribing to his newsletter. Here he details all the essentials on screening your patients.

To me, the most important aspect of patient care is knowing who you can and cannot treat. Stratifying your patients based on who needs to be referred out, and who you can help is essential to providing the best care.

Quite simply, there are few better resources out there that outline how to do this than Scott’s ebook.

In it, he delves into what relevant questions to ask, tests to perform, and establishing a relevant diagnosis. Often underlooked, yet exceptionally important components of the clinical examination.

Again, I cannot recommend Scott’s ebook and site enough. It’s a great resource for many things PT, including many of his eclectic and unique manual therapy techniques. Definitely check this guy out.

Rehabbing a 5th Metatarsal Fracture to High Level Basketball

In this podcast, I outline a case I worked on back when I was in the NBA D League. 

This kid suffered a distal 5th metatarsal fracture with only a couple minutes to spare in a game. It was a brutal injury after one of the worst games in my life that I experienced, namely because we had three guys go down in one game.

Talk about awful.

I outline my entire process and every detail of what I did to get this kid back to high level basketball. A process that started with a fracture and ended with him establishing a franchise rebounding record the last game of the season. Pretty spectacular to say the least.

I feel very fortunate to have worked with such a driven and hardworking guy, and ultimately that was what his success hinged upon. Though minor, it was an honor to be this guy’s guide back to high level performance.

In this podcast, we dive into the following topics:

  • Immediate post-injury rehabilitation
  • Post-surgical care
  • The non-weight bearing phase
  • The weight bearing phase
  • Return to play Criteria
  • Return to performance criteria
  • Acute:chronic workload monitoring

Again, thank you to Scott Gray for featuring me on the podcast. I had a blast doing it.

If you’d like to download this podcast and get my free acute:chronic workload calculator that I used with this patient, subscribe to my newsletter by clicking here or simply fill out the form below.

Join the email list

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How to Deadlift – A Movement Deep Dive

Deadlift – A Total Body Workout

It is hard to find a better fundamental exercise than the deadlift. A time-tested move that ought to be learned by all—whether you’re a professional athlete, bodybuilder, fitness client, or grandma with back pain.

What if you don’t know how to deadlift? Or maybe you just want to get better at coaching it?

You’ve come to the right place.

This “Movement Deep Dive” focuses on the deadlift and all of its variants.

You’ll learn why the deadlift is so important, how to do it progressing and regressing the moven, and how to fix common errors.

So grab some chalk, branched chain amino acids, pen, and paper. This one’s a mother.

If you can’t watch the video right away, I’ve provided a modified transcript below. I would recommend both watching the video and reading the post to get the most out of the material.

Learn on!

Continue reading “How to Deadlift – A Movement Deep Dive”

Continuing Education: The Complete Guide to Mastery

75

That’s my number.

No, not that number.

 

Pervert

75 is the number of continuing education classes, conferences, home studies, etc that I’ve completed since physical therapy school.

Though the courses are many, it was probably too much in a short period of time. When quantity is pursued, quality suffers. Sadly, I didn’t figure out how to get the most out of each class until the latter end of my career.

Two classes in particular stand out: Mobilisation of the Nervous System by the NOI Group, and ART lower extremity.

Yes, the content was great, but these classes stood out for a different reason. You see, instead of just doing a little bit of prep work, I kicked it up a notch. I extensively reviewed supportive material, took impeccable notes, and hit all the other essentials needed to effectively learn.

I was prepared, and because I was prepared I got so much more out of these classes than my typical fair.  The lessons learned in those courses stick with me to this day.

For the stuff you really want to learn, I’ll encourage you to do the same. Here is the way to get the most out of your continuing education. By the time you are done reading this post, you’ll understand why I now recommend a more focused learning approach and fewer courses.

Let’s see how to do it.

 

Continue reading “Continuing Education: The Complete Guide to Mastery”